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Old 10-14-2005, 03:26 PM   #1
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Bread Making (by hand) Question

I am thinking of trying to make a loaf of bread (w/ yeast). I have used yeast once or twice in the past and found that my the yeast doesn't rise properly unless I turn the oven on warm, set the bowl on the stove w/ the oven door cracked.

The temp in my apartment is usually in the mid 60s. Is this not warm enough for yeast to rise? I find that with the technique above, dough rises, no problem...but the bottome of the bowl gets hard, kinda like it semi-cooks the dough.

Because of needing to use the oven, I feel like bread making takes all day and I can't leave the house. I don't have a bread machine and don't want one because I wouldn't use it enough...

Thoughts??? Am I doing something wrong maybe? I've only ever made foccocia bread and a cheddar cheese loaf bread.

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Old 10-14-2005, 03:33 PM   #2
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Yeast will rise with temps in the 60s, it will just take longer. Many bread, pizza dough, etc. recipes call for proofing overnight in the refrigerator, so temp just slows down the process.

So make your dough in the morning and come back after lunch (or later) to make the bread.
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Old 10-14-2005, 03:35 PM   #3
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Be sure to oil your bowl well; that should help with the bottom feeling a little hard/crusty.

If you have a washer/dryer in your apartment, put the bowl of dough on top of the dryer when you're doing a load of wash. It gets warm on top, the dough rises and you're being extra efficient!
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Old 10-14-2005, 03:35 PM   #4
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Thanks Andy. I might try making some bread this weekend.

I've seen yeast in the store that comes in the fridge section. Can I use this instead of the yeast/water combo? Is it a 1:1 replacement? If the recipe calls for 1 pkg yeast, can I get one of the pkg from the fridge? I hope you know what I am talking about...I've never used the stuff...
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Old 10-14-2005, 03:40 PM   #5
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I use mostly Active Dry Yeast in a packet. I'm not sure about the cake yeast.
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Old 10-14-2005, 07:47 PM   #6
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htc,

I like a long rise unless I'm in a hurry, the flavor of the bread is more developed and I like that..I made a loaf from a recipe by J. Pepin and it was wonderful bread, of course I believe I got three round loaves from the recipe..Well worth the long wait, but, I was able to get other things done while waiting for the bread to rise...
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Old 10-22-2005, 08:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htc
I am thinking of trying to make a loaf of bread (w/ yeast). I have used yeast once or twice in the past and found that my the yeast doesn't rise properly unless I turn the oven on warm, set the bowl on the stove w/ the oven door cracked.

The temp in my apartment is usually in the mid 60s. Is this not warm enough for yeast to rise? I find that with the technique above, dough rises, no problem...but the bottome of the bowl gets hard, kinda like it semi-cooks the dough.

Because of needing to use the oven, I feel like bread making takes all day and I can't leave the house. I don't have a bread machine and don't want one because I wouldn't use it enough...

Thoughts??? Am I doing something wrong maybe? I've only ever made foccocia bread and a cheddar cheese loaf bread.
You don't mention what *type* of yeast you're using - active dry or instant. For an explanation, see http://home.earthlink.net/~myjunketc/data/yeast.htm

Yeast will multiply at a temp of ~ 65F but the rise will be *very slow*. As others note, a slow rise contributes to the flavor of the bread and is therefore a plus.

I would *not* recommend your method of turning the oven on warm, and setting the bowl on the stove w/ the oven door cracked.. This contributes to hardening of your dough in spots, since heat is unevenly applied.

Rather, as others have suggested, put your kneaded dough in a *lightly oiled* container well covered with plastic wrap and let it rise overnight in the 'frig. Or you could probably leave it out overnight (again, oiled and covered) if you plan to bake the next day.

You will still need a final rise "in the pan" (or "on the board" if it is a freeform loaf) and, at your lower temp, it's hard to say exactly how much time will be required for this final rise . You might want to check out my post in http://discusscooking.com/forums/sho...3&page=2&pp=10


You also don't mention what type of bread you're interested in making. There are untold variations and without further info, its hard to make further suggestions.

Believe me, bread dough is quite flexible and you can probably, with some experimentation, arrive at a method that doesn't have you at the mercy of your dough but will fit within your schedule.

If you want to post back with your recipe, maybe I (and others) could give you more targeted advice.
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