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Old 09-03-2005, 04:01 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona
There are no real "rules" - just use a preferment for your bread (which you did) which keeps the thread on-topic. [..] Both the preferment recipe and the final dough recipe were really clear. Thanks for taking the time to post them.
Ok, thanks. I'll keep posting my results, then.

Quote:
I loved your post and the follow-up pictures.
Well... I couldn't get a clear picture of the interior structure at the very end. I kept getting pictures which looked like I was shaking the camera. I'll have to find a completely different forum to post questions about that. Or is there a food photography section of this one? :-)


Quote:
QUESTION(S):
> what was the oven temp and baking time for your baguettes?
> did you transfer the risen loaves to a baking stone or just put the pan in the oven? (looks like the latter to me)
> did you use any home steaming techniques?
I cooked at 500 degrees F for 12-15 minutes.

I cooked directly on the cookie sheet, though I did spray it with oil AND sprinkled some cornmeal along the bottom. I'm going to use parchment paper from now on, though. Easier and cleaner. That oil never seems to clean off the sheet pan.

I didn't use any steaming techniques.

Thanks for taking interest!
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Old 09-04-2005, 11:16 AM   #72
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Two Questions for amcardon

Quote:
Originally Posted by amcardon on 09-01-2005, 06:16 PM
I made my biga yesterday, let it sit, went to work with it today and it was exactly like you described.
I'm curious what biga recipe you used. Was it the one from The Italian Baker by Carol Field mentioned in this thread and available here Biga Recipe from The Italian Baker by Carol Field

Quote:
Originally Posted by amcardon on 09-01-2005, 09:22 PM
Okay, so honestly this is the best bread I have ever made! Not only does it look good (which usually isn't so) but it tastes GREAT!...
Were you using one of the recipes posted in this thread? If yes, which one?
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Old 09-04-2005, 07:58 PM   #73
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Kind of... I went off the recipe you posted but sort of combined it with one of my friend's. She had used that recipe in the past and had made some changes for the climate/elevation here. Not huge differences, but she combines flours (50% bread flour, 35% AP and 15% of her home-ground wheat) and adds a little lemon juice to the biga... The lemon juice was mainly for the phytic acid.
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Old 10-06-2005, 07:14 PM   #74
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I was always kinda disappointed that my posts re making a white loaf in a loaf pan using Carol Field's biga recipe never really displayed properly in the browser after our switch to new forum software.

For those who still have an interest, I have combined all 3 of my posts (complete with links and pix) in a single page which is both more viewable and (hopefully) printable than the originals. You may see (or download it) from DCposts-myLoafBreadWithBiga

I continue to work on my freeform loaf with biga - in fact, I just took a loaf out of the oven 5 minutes ago. Look for a post from me on my progress in the next few days.

subfuscpersona [3545]
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Old 10-27-2005, 11:12 AM   #75
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HELP!!!

What happen yesterday is that I had to interupt my baking and get to work.
The bread was already in the lightly greased bowl rising. Next would have been after it completely rose the next step would be to plop it on a floured board and form into what ever bread you desire.

I couldn't do that so I covered it with plastic and put it into the refrig.

Today I took it out and it was cold of course. I plopped it on the board and kneeded it a bit to "warm" it up and put it back into the greased bowl and covered it for rising. I put it in a warm place.

Now, it's been an hour and half and it looks doubled.
I am going to put it on the board and make baggettes (about three) or hogie sized rolls (about 6), then put them on a sheet pan (cookie sheet) cover and let rise again.

The Question is: Am I going to have good bread at the end? I am doing just the regular routine. Should I be doing something else?
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Old 10-27-2005, 08:00 PM   #76
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I think you'll be fine.
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Old 10-27-2005, 11:08 PM   #77
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Well johnjohn it turn just okay. The crust was a little too thick. I guess because I beat it up too much. But I will eat it anyway and try again without interuptions.
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Old 11-21-2005, 12:34 PM   #78
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Butter-Sponge Bread

I decided to check my sourdough on Saturday and found that it had sat too long and wouldn't rise when fed. So I decided to make a standard yeast bread. It was a great success so I'm posting the recipe. It was one of the best White Breads I've yet made.

Ingrediants:

5 cups flour
3 cups water, about 105' F. temperature
1 tbs. dried yeast
1/8 cup light corn syrup
4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup cooking oil

Mix the corn syrup, yeast and 1 cup water together in a glass or plastic bowl. Let sit in a protected place for abut ten minutes.

In a seperate bowl, combine the flour and salt. When the ten minutes has elapsed, check the yeast/water mixture. It should be very frothy. Pour this and the cooking oil into the dough. Add the remaining water. Stir with a wooden spoon to mix the ingredients, then knead until the dough is smooth and elastic. If it is too sticky, add 1/8 cup four and knead into the dough.

When the dough is correct, it should be lightly sticky, smooth and elastic. Cover the bowl.

Heat an additional 2 cups of water in a microwave-safe container until it boils (about 2 minutes). Place the bowl containing the bread dough over the hot water and close the microwave door. This will heat the sough sufficeintly to get the yeast working, without killing the yeast. Let rise for an hour, or until doubled in bulk.

Remove from the microwave and reheat the water. Place 3/4 of the bread dough into a loaf pan (it should half fill the pan) and place back on the hot water. Again close the door. Let rise for 3 hours. This will give the dough sufficent time to both rise and relax. The four hour rise time will give you a tender and light crust, with a very moist and soft inner structure.

Bake at 350 degrees for about 35 minutes. The bread will be golden in color and should sound hollow when lightly tapped with a knuckle. At this point, remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack. Brush with melted butter or cooking oil on all sides.

I let this bread rise for so long as I got distracted and forgot about the bread during the second rise. When I baked it, it came out so very good. The bread has a delicate flavor and texture. It is so delicate that you need to slice at least inch thick slices or they will fall apart.

I toasted this bread and it had excellent texture for a good strawberry jam. I also heated it with butter, in the microwave for 15 seconds. It soaked the butter in alike a sponge, hence the name. It was also great when brushed with EVOO and grilled to a golden brown. You have to use with garlic powder rather than rubbing with fresh garlic though as it tears too easily.

This bread soaks up a brothy soup like no other, and due to its mild flavor, goes with any flavor soup, or sauce.

I really like this bread and will be trying the technique with whole wheat. This recipe would make outstanding hot-crossed buns or dinner rolls as well.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-02-2005, 07:18 PM   #79
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Bump!

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-05-2005, 08:42 PM   #80
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my Freeform Loaf with Preferment - Part II

my Freeform Loaf with Preferment - Part II

Hello fellow bakers! I have been learning and baking and am now happy to present the fruits of my knowledge.

I'm giving a link to a page on my personal website for this post since the DC "reply" box is not set up for the kind of lengthy post (with formatting and photos) that I wanted to include. Everything is available at my Freeform Loaf with Preferment Part II
so click that link, read my stuff, and then click the link at the bottom of that page to return here to this thread at DC and post your feedback.

At my Freeform Loaf with Preferment Part II
you will find
> detailed discussions of equipment
> detailed recipes, by weight and volume, for both the preferment and the final bread
> bakers percentage formulas for the preferment and the final bread
> detailed kneading instructions for hand or stand mixer
> detailed shaping and baking instructions
> copious pictures to guide you in your efforts

...peruse, enjoy, post back...my home page contains easy links so you can post back to this thread

PLEASE GIVE FEEDBACK!

many thanks - SF [4510]
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