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Old 10-07-2011, 08:05 PM   #11
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I learned a great trick from my Aunt Mary. When you freeze bread, put a clean paper towel in with the bread. It collects the moisture so you have better bread after thawing! It works for me! Try it!
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Old 10-08-2011, 01:32 AM   #12
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When my family moved to California when I was about 16, my Mom and I fell in love with sourdough bread. But everyone else in the family would only eat the plain white bread that we were raised on by necessity. So, she and I would keep it in the freezer, and plie off a slice and toast it for breakfast. It was a great Mom/Daughter thing.
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Old 10-08-2011, 05:03 AM   #13
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Thanks for the tip re: paper towels. I'll do that next time I go to my folks. We make bread daily, so left-over bread/storing bread is not an issue. We feed day-old to the hens or dogs.
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Old 10-08-2011, 08:03 AM   #14
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Good tip, regarding the paper towels.

Just my wife and I at our house, and we don't eat a lot of bread. When I bake bread or buy it, the first thing I usually do is cut it in half and throw the half in the freezer for some other time.
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Old 10-08-2011, 10:48 AM   #15
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Well, I get strange looks from friends when they are at the house and they see a paper towel in the bread or the buns, etc. But then when I go to their place I see that they are doing it too now! :)
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Old 10-08-2011, 01:21 PM   #16
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I keep bread in the refrigerator, taking it out and placing it on the counter about 1 hour before I am going to use it. If I forget to take it out, 15 seconds in the microwave does the trick.
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Old 10-09-2011, 10:52 AM   #17
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Bread Box

I keep my store-bought bread in my metal bread box.
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:47 AM   #18
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I do the paper towel thing with lettuce and other greens, changing it each time I use the greens. Seems it would work well for bread and will try it. Thanks!
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Old 10-09-2011, 03:46 PM   #19
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I dont like the way the fridge loses the breads softness, the cold just makes it moist and harder than when at room temp, so I dont seem to benefit from putting it in there. I know alot of people that have the same habit of simply throwing it in the fridge, but moist bread does go off slightly faster than kitchen temp (unless your kitchen is really warm, lol).. I only need to freeze when buying alot, as it gets eaten fast. Thanks for the tips-some sort of bread bin (or simply anywhere in the kitchen away from the window/out of the sunlight) seems to be the best way to go.. but I still dont get why my bread is going green faster when its kept in a small, low kitchen cupboard? Perhaps this very small low cupboard is warmer than the kitchen itself-but how likely is that? Ill need to do a kitchen cupboard temperature check :) If my cupboard really is slightly cooler, perhaps by putting the bread inside it, this slight cooling down by a couple of degrees/temperature change of bread that had been at room temp for a day or two beforehand-was a bad thing? Could this speed up the process of 'going green' just as fast as warming? I wonder..
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Old 10-09-2011, 05:21 PM   #20
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Some websites state that bread in the fridge will go STALE faster (hard and dry) and at room temperature will go MOULDY faster (green)! That must be why they recommend to store at room temp, to be eaten soft and fresh, if bread mould normally only shows up after a week, and break should be eaten wihin this time anyway. I still wondered why my bread was going off fast, but I think the size of the storage space and temperature within it must have been to blame-most packaged bread labels say to store in a 'cool dry place', but thats usually referring to before its ever been opened. It doesnt say what temp to keep it at after its open. One bread website states that small storage is bad for tightly wrapped bread, eg 'As moisture/humidity rises, the local environment of the bread (inside the bag) becomes a hot-house and mold spores will quickly multiply. That is why we suggest not storing our bread in an enclosed space when it is above 20 Celsius. A simple remedy is to open the bag and let the moisture escape, or in severe cases (say in the heat of summer), take the bread right out of the bag for a short while, though in this circumstance, putting the bread in the fridge is also not a bad idea. Otherwise, the bread will also just dry out.' I think this should surely apply to all types of bread, so perhaps not wrapping the bread too tight, and keeping it in a dark location, that remains at the same temp/doesnt build up in heat, eg a METAL breadbin (breadbox if in usa), may be the best bet? I still think the cupboard I stored it in was cooler than the kitchen outside of it, but again, ill need a temperature check for that cupboard, lol
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