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Old 09-19-2016, 09:54 AM   #1
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Bread Yeast Question

A couple days ago I was watching the food channel and there was an interview with an artisan baker - he claimed his yeast was over 10 years old.
He stored it in a jar and kept topping it up.

I was too busy looking after my daughter to pay careful attention.
Does any member know of a way or at least a link that I could do the same.

I have cultivated beer yeast before, but never baking.

Thank you kindly,

Snowbeast

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Old 09-19-2016, 10:00 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbeast View Post
A couple days ago I was watching the food channel and there was an interview with an artisan baker - he claimed his yeast was over 10 years old.
He stored it in a jar and kept topping it up.

I was too busy looking after my daughter to pay careful attention.
Does any member know of a way or at least a link that I could do the same.

I have cultivated beer yeast before, but never baking.

Thank you kindly,

Snowbeast
Perhaps he was taking about a sourdough starter of some sort?
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Old 09-19-2016, 10:08 AM   #3
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Thank you, i'll google that. Might jog my memory.
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Old 09-19-2016, 01:49 PM   #4
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The oldest sourdough we have in my friendship group is 250 years old. Sourdoughs can go on for ever. Sadly mine sourdough has died and starting a new seams not to work.

All you need if flour and water and time.
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Old 09-19-2016, 06:00 PM   #5
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Sourdough, can go on for a long time. Commercial yeast going for 10 years? I would be curious to know how if it's true?
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Old 09-19-2016, 10:38 PM   #6
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This is as my friends have said, a sourdough sarter. Mine is from a cullture that has been active since 1847. Mine comes from the same source, and has been active for ten years now.

If you would like a great sourdogh starter I would suggest the Carl Griffith 1847 strain. If you send them $5 for postage and maintenance there are people that have as a testament to Mr. Griffith, have been preserving his starter for years.

the friends of Carl Griffith have a website here:

Carl Griffith 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Page

A sourdough starter is different than normal yeast, in that it is a start to a dough making process. The yeast in it is something that can last for decades and centuries, just involves being fed a mix of 2/3 flour to 1/3 water once a week, the yeast will live. It does tend to adapt itself to your local yeast and bacterial situation. When I moved to Oklahoma, and when I moved back to PA in both cases it took the yeasties a month to adjust, they made bread, it just wasn't as good as it normally was.

I keep mine in a porcelain pot from King Arthur Flour, feed it once a week or so. Mine has been alive now for 16 years.

Commercial yeast is asleep, and dies after a while, a sourdough starter is a living colony of yeast. Thus it refreshes itself. It does take some maintenance, and has to be fed about once a week or so (you can fudge this). If you want to start a starter, helps to have a dedicated, not airtight container you will use for it.

You want to pull it out once a week, feed it, and let it go back to sleep, if you aren't using it. Use it often and you are just talking of replenishment.

TBS
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Old 09-20-2016, 05:46 AM   #7
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Fox, you write about your starter as if it were your child. If you haven't already, I think that you should give it a name.
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Old 09-20-2016, 05:57 AM   #8
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Thank you! That sounds exactly like what I was watching.
I'm not too clued up on baking as I've just started the journey.
As I'm moving into a very rural area I'm teaching myself quickly to bake so I always have bread.
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Old 09-20-2016, 07:14 AM   #9
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I picked up a copy of "Flour Water Salt Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza" by Ken Forkish from the local library. I thought it gave an excellent explanation of bread making for the home baker. If I was serious about making bread I would purchase a copy for reference. I just dabble in making bread, mostly dutch oven bread.
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Old 09-20-2016, 11:11 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I picked up a copy of "Flour Water Salt Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza" by Ken Forkish from the local library. I thought it gave an excellent explanation of bread making for the home baker. If I was serious about making bread I would purchase a copy for reference. I just dabble in making bread, mostly dutch oven bread.
Excellent book tenspeed, I recommend it. I also would recommend for bread one of my go too books on ALL things cooking. Darina Allen's "Forgotton Skills of Cooking" to wit:

Forgotten Skills of Cooking: The Time-Honored Ways Are the Best--Over 700 Recipes Show You Why by Darina Allen, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble®

It has an excellent chapter on breads and baking, including the best description I have seen on making your own sourdough starter, and maintaining it.

The Allen book also has quite a few other things to its credit. The chapter on tripe alone is worth buying it, and makes my Beloved Wife EXTREMELY NERVOUS when I start to look at. Poor wife, she is more often the victim then the beneficiary of my culinary adventurism.

I'm still not allowed to go to Chinatown unsupervised after the Jellyfish incident of 2009. In my defense the Jellyfish were on sale, and I got an excellent price for them. I mean can I be faulted for not knowing how to prepare jellyfish? Do you know how to prepare them?

Of course my sourdough starter has a name. Sean Charles McYeastington. If he were a person he would be a staid solid Englishman, prone to wearing tweed blazers with worn elbows perhaps with a touch of chalkdust about him. Takes his tea at four pm precisely he does. One lump of sugar, which he feels rather guilty about and no cream.
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