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Old 07-28-2005, 10:19 AM   #11
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Maybe because the walk-in is kept cooler than most fridges at home are; we also didn't completey encase it, like in a ziplock; just had parchment over the top and tucked down the sides, after the top of the dough was oiled.


I would think ziplocks or any plastic bag (? Did you oil the inside of the bag?) would work great.

And yes, the longer you proof the dough, the more flavor from the little yeasties will develop!
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Old 07-28-2005, 10:22 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by msalper
Could you please explain more fully about sugar/nutrients? Thank you John...
Certainly! Sugar is yeast food. It's what they eat in order to give off CO2 (and alcohol). The nutrients are things like diammonium phosphate, nitrogen, etc. that help promote yeast health and reproduction.

When yeast are stored long term, not all of them make it. by providing an environment with food and nutrients, the remaining yeast will wake up and start reproducing, ensuring that you have a healthy population of viable yeast.

Hope this helps!
John
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Old 07-28-2005, 10:44 AM   #13
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<<feeling like I'm back in high school science class>>

Ummmm....... Mr. Ronjohn, will this be on the test?
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Old 07-28-2005, 10:55 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by jkath
<<feeling like I'm back in high school science class>>

Ummmm....... Mr. Ronjohn, will this be on the test?
Yes, we'll be covering yeast nutrients and reproductions, specific gravities, fermentations, and alpha acid isomerizations.

Study samples will be available... Just show your ID to the bartender.

John
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Old 07-28-2005, 11:27 AM   #15
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Yes, we'll be covering yeast nutrients and reproductions, specific gravities, fermentations, and alpha acid isomerizations.

Study samples will be available... Just show your ID to the bartender.

John
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Old 07-29-2005, 08:34 AM   #16
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Thank you guys!!.
It was very educational John !!!
I will make some tries about it and I'll let you know my test later...
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Old 07-30-2005, 11:00 PM   #17
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After kneading yeast dough enough and being sure if it has risen perfectly, can we keep it in refrigerator or special pot, I don't know, for a week or more?
Its hard to give a good answer to your question without knowing the *type* of yeast dough that you wish to refrigerate as the amount of fat and, to some degree, the amount of sweetener will affect the appropriate answer. If you wish, please post the recipe(s) you're using so I can target my answer better.

Absent knowing what *type* of yeast dough you wish to refrigerate, here are some general guidelines...

Almost all yeast-rising doughs can benefit from a final rise (prior to the pre-baking rise) in a refrigerator for a period of 8 to 24 hours. This slow, refrigerator rise, is a well-known technique for developing flavor in yeast-rising doughs.

In this case the (punched down) dough is put in a *lightly oiled* container, the top of the dough is also *lightly oiled*, the container is covered closely with plastic wrap, and the dough is let rise in the refrigerator. The container must be large enough to allow the dough to at least double in bulk, as yeast action will continue under refrigeration until the dough is cooled completely. The actual time it takes to stop yeast action depends on the temp of the 'frig and the material of the container (a thin metal container will cool more rapidly than, for example, a thick pottery bowl).

A "crust" can form on refrigerated dough over time, especially if the dough is held in the 'frig over 24 hrs. The "crust" is simply the natural effect of the evaporation of moisture in the dough from it's surface. This can be prevented by [1] closely covering the bowl with plastic wrap and [2] having the top of the dough *lightly* greased or oiled (since fat/oil provides a natural barrier to water). As extra insurance, you can put plastic wrap directly on top of the oiled dough as well as covering the top of the bowl.

I personally have only held refrigerated dough for about 24 hours. If you want to hold the dough longer than this, I would suggest refrigerating the dough for a max of 24 hours, punching it down, and then wrapping it well in plastic wrap and freezing it (put a label on it re type of dough and freezing date). In my experience, frozen dough, when defrosted, does rise and bake well. Defrost the dough in the 'frig. If you defrost it at room temperature, the dough on the outside will begin to rise while the inside is still frozen. When defrosted, shape it the usual way and give it a final rise "in the pan" prior to baking it according to your recipe. The final rise may take longer than usual since the dough will be cool.

Do, if you wish, experiment with holding dough under frigeration for 24 to 72 hrs. However, be aware that, when dough is held under refrigeration it *can* develop an *acidic* or *yeasty* taste that may not be to your liking. Again, the amount of fat, sweetener, salt and (even) yeast will all affect the final taste as they all have an effect on how rapidly yeast can multiply in the dough.

If you're attempting to duplicate the procedure of a professional kitchen/bakery/pizzeria, be cautious. An ordinary home kitchen can seldom duplicate the conditions of a professional bakery. It is better to know your own kitchen than to follow blindly the methods of a professional kitchen. If you are, in fact, attempting to duplicate the procedures of a professional kitchen, at least arm yourself with a *detailed explanation* of the equipment, temperatures, recipes and timing used. This will guide you in your efforts.

Best of luck...
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Old 07-31-2005, 12:03 AM   #18
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I'm sure glad you got into the discussion sub! A very eloquent and concise answer.
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Old 07-31-2005, 09:11 AM   #19
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I'm sure glad you got into the discussion sub! A very eloquent and concise answer.
thanks Michael! Do I get karma?
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Old 07-31-2005, 09:41 AM   #20
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thanks Michael! Do I get karma?
You did from me!
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