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Old 03-23-2015, 07:01 AM   #21
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Thanks for this. I should know how to deal with dry yeast as I am a home brewer with over 50 years of experience.
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:03 AM   #22
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I have got Allisons Dried yeast. It states on the instructions: 1tsp sugar in 150ml of warm water 1 part boiling 2 parts cold. No temperature value mentioned. I have tried this in a mixture of warm milk and sugar (35c). There is no sign of yeast activation.
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:19 AM   #23
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35C should be fine. I find I see some working beasties in less than a minute and by 5 I have very good action and a good head of foam.

How old is the yeast?
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:04 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desmond View Post
I have got Allisons Dried yeast. It states on the instructions: 1tsp sugar in 150ml of warm water 1 part boiling 2 parts cold. No temperature value mentioned. I have tried this in a mixture of warm milk and sugar (35c). There is no sign of yeast activation.
Sounds to me like those yeasties are dead.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:45 PM   #25
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I have got Allisons Dried yeast. It states on the instructions: 1tsp sugar in 150ml of warm water 1 part boiling 2 parts cold. No temperature value mentioned. I have tried this in a mixture of warm milk and sugar (35c). There is no sign of yeast activation.
This method is sort of hit or miss, since it can vary a lot depending on how cold your tap water is. Also, boiling temperature changes with elevation.

I shoot for 110F or 43C (most recipes that call for this specify about that temp - I have one for dinner rolls that calls for 120F - 49C, but that is added directly to the dry ingredients without proofing). 35C is a bit low - at less than body temperature it would even feel cool to touch, while it should feel warm. I usually nuke the water in the microwave for about 10 seconds at a time until it hits 105-110F with my instant read thermometer, then add the yeast and sugar. I also only add 1/2 tsp of sugar unless the recipe calls for more. 1/2 tsp will give the yeast something to feed on without changing the flavor of the bread.

I also keep my yeast in the freezer to keep it fresh, then measure out what I need and let it sit on the counter for 5 minutes to "thaw". I'm not sure that really matters, but at least it doesn't chill the proofing liquid as much.
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Old 03-28-2015, 02:00 PM   #26
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I find that my dry yeast does better if it has both flour AND sugar to feed off of. And I make sure the temp is always between 110F-120F. Never have had a fail yet. When you add the warm water, the yeast come alive. So just a pinch of sugar and a larger pinch of flour should suffice. Within five minutes you should have a full bloom of the yeast.
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:36 AM   #27
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I find that my dry yeast does better if it has both flour AND sugar to feed off of. And I make sure the temp is always between 110F-120F. Never have had a fail yet. When you add the warm water, the yeast come alive. So just a pinch of sugar and a larger pinch of flour should suffice. Within five minutes you should have a full bloom of the yeast.
If one has the time, it's a good idea to make a poolish or biga (also called a sponge) to proof and develop the yeast. It can be made anywhere from 2 hours to a day ahead of when you want to start mixing the dough, and gives the yeast a little more time to ferment.

I usually make a poolish in the bowl of my KA mixer the evening before I'm going to make ciabatta, and leave it out on the counter covered overnight. That way its ready to just add the rest of the ingredients and mix and knead with the dough hook.
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Old 03-29-2015, 12:38 PM   #28
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If one has the time, it's a good idea to make a poolish or biga (also called a sponge) to proof and develop the yeast. It can be made anywhere from 2 hours to a day ahead of when you want to start mixing the dough, and gives the yeast a little more time to ferment.

I usually make a poolish in the bowl of my KA mixer the evening before I'm going to make ciabatta, and leave it out on the counter covered overnight. That way its ready to just add the rest of the ingredients and mix and knead with the dough hook.
I have done that too. But I think the best one I ever made was from grapes. They were covered in wild yeast and made the most delicious poolish. It took about a week for all of the grapes to be eaten by the yeast. But I had me some glorious loaves of bread from those grapes inspired yeast. I kept feeding it each day with flour and just a pinch of sugar. I also had to add some additional warm water a couple of times. I did have to skip one day as it was growing out of control. I transferred it to a bigger container. I used the final piece for a huge large family size pizza.
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Old 03-30-2015, 02:00 PM   #29
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You folks are something special. My kind of folk.

It took me s while to figure it, thanks for your post, it don on me that it was a joke. I didn't know what "blue pils were". Guess I'm not old enough.


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Old 03-31-2015, 07:07 AM   #30
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It took me s while to figure it, thanks for your post, it don on me that it was a joke. I didn't know what "blue pils were". Guess I'm not old enough.

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Congratulations! You are then the lucky one!
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