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Old 05-03-2006, 06:18 AM   #1
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Red face Croissant won't rise!

hi everyone,

i got this recipe froma website , i made them the taste was great but my croissant won't rise...
i think problem with yeast cause i used it in pizza dough too and it stiffens does not rises. thats the only yeast that is avaiable here , teh instruction say no need to dissolve it in milk or water can be added directly to flour!
can anyone help me and suggest something plz, the future of my bread making depends upon it !

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Old 05-03-2006, 07:01 AM   #2
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Can you show us the recipe?

The water where you add the yeast to should be warm, but not hot and contains sugar/honey.
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Old 05-03-2006, 07:58 AM   #3
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sure this is the place where i got the recipe!http://www.cooking.com/recipes/static/recipe314.htm
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Old 05-03-2006, 09:29 AM   #4
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I've never made croissants, but have made bread many many times. Strange that you don't need to give it time to rise....

Have you checked the expiration date on your yeast packet? Many times they've expired and you don't know it!
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Old 05-03-2006, 10:22 AM   #5
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I found this recipe which seems quite professional. I think jkath has a point, the rising process just before baking (which was missing from the recipe Sam gave) may be the crucial difference.

It seems like a huge endeavour, but I would like to give it a try when I am particularly motivated... here in Italy "Cornetti" are much more popular, looks exactly like croissant but the texture is more caky and much sweeter, although cornetti are very good too, it is rather difficult to find a well made flaky buttery French style croissants, which I sorely miss!!
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Old 05-03-2006, 12:13 PM   #6
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It does have an hour rising time in the recipe before you bake the croissants. I would dissolve the yeast that you have in water or milk, even though it says you don't need to on the yeast packet. I bet that would make a big difference. I've made croissants many times using Julia Child's recipe.
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Old 05-03-2006, 12:22 PM   #7
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Disolving the yeast in the liquid, with sugar or honey, proves the yeast is still viable, that is, it's still a living organizm. It doesn't do anything else to help the pastry rise. If the yeast is good, you can add it directly to the flour, add the warm liquid and sugar/honey, and your dough will rise. I also believe that as the yeast is dissolved and become well distributed in the liquid, it will be better distributed throughout the dough.

But you can't tell if the yeast is good unless you proof it first. That's why I agree that you should dissolve the yeast into a liquid sweetend with sugar or honey. When it foams, you know you're ready to add the other ingredients.

Hope that helps.
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Old 05-03-2006, 12:30 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
When it foams, you know you're ready to add the other ingredients.
Weed, I didn't know it was supposed to foam. Maybe that's why I can't get bread to rise?
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Old 05-03-2006, 01:19 PM   #9
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Hi Constance as Goodweed indicated if the yeast is alive it will bubble up. It's kind of fun to watch this chemistry in progress.

I normally stir the warm water or milk with the yeast and some honey or sugar and in 15 minutes or so it starts to become a pudding consistency and starts to rise to the top of the cup.

This is how you know that your yeast is awake so to speak. I also stir that with the liquid first and then pour it to my dough to ensure even distribution.
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
I found this recipe which seems quite professional. I think jkath has a point, the rising process just before baking (which was missing from the recipe Sam gave) may be the crucial difference.
This is close to what I used to do, except I didn't (would not) use margarine, and did not use half-and-half, although that sounds good to my stomach . Plus I gave it three turns - makes them fluffier - but it only took two sessions to do that, as I would do two turns at once. Although that may take a bit of practice? However, the recipe as is looks good. It's just the technique of putting it together, and the time.

The first recipe posted gives you more like a cake/bread type product, nice and fluffy, but airy. Possibly closer to the “Cornetti”, whereas the second recipe is meant to layer the butter and dough and gives you a “mille feuille”, million leaves, effect. Le voila le raison d’été pour l’amour des croisant français. (This being the reason for the love of the French croisant.)
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