"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-02-2015, 03:00 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 36
Freezing bread...

When you bake bread and want to freeze a loaf, do you pop it straight into the freezer while it's warm or do you wait until it's completely cooled?

I'm thinking that when it's warm, there might be more water in there that would lead to freezer burn, but also have this urge to freeze it quickly to keep it soft. I just don't know.

Can I just wrap it in plastic wrap and then put it in a normal plastic bread bag or do I need to use big freezer bag? Should I use foil? My grandma always had a bunch of layers of stuff around things she froze- plastic, then paper towel, then more plastic, then foil. Is that necessary or was she just nuts with the wrapping?

I know I'm reaching here, but...could I maybe take it out of the oven a few minutes early, freeze, and then pop it back in the oven to thaw/warm later? Or would that just ruin everything?

Any answer to any of my multiple questions will be much appreciated. I am falling in love with home-made bread. :)

__________________

__________________
Blackitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 03:17 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,387
I would cool the bread completely to room temperature before wrapping and freezing. It's not extra moisture that causes freezer burn. It's the warming nd cooling cycles the draw moisture out of the food item and leave it dried out.

Wrap cooled loaves/rolls as snugly as possible in plastic wrap. Air spaces promote freezer burn. Place the plastic wrapped bread into a freezer bag, press air out of the bag and seal it.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 05:31 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Yes, what Andy said!
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 06:20 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,896
What Andy said Thaw it, unwrapped, on the counter. If you want, you can warm it up in the oven after thawing.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 07:21 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 36
Okay! Freezer bag shopping I will be!

I hadn't thought of thawing wrapped vs unwrapped. Excellent add-on advice.

Thank you so much. :)
__________________
Blackitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 08:10 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,229
You might also consider how you're going to use the bread.

Freezing the whole loaf is best for freezing and the way to go if you're going to consume the loaf in short order once thawed.

Slicing it before freezing is the way to go if you want to use it a few slices at a time while keeping the rest frozen.
__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 08:38 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
And no, your grandmother was not nuts with wrapping. She was just overly cautious.

I know it may sound crazy, and I am not the only one in the world who does this, but I squeeze as much air out of the freezer bag as possible, zip it close almost to the end of the zip track, then suck the remaining air out with a straw. Your freezer bag should be hugging the item to be frozen.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 02:04 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
You might also consider how you're going to use the bread.

Freezing the whole loaf is best for freezing and the way to go if you're going to consume the loaf in short order once thawed.

Slicing it before freezing is the way to go if you want to use it a few slices at a time while keeping the rest frozen.
I'd love to freeze half-loaves because I usually don't get all the way through a loaf before it begins to stale and end up eating bread when I don't want it, just to use it up.

I figured you had to freeze it whole or nothing. I'm going to do the Half-loaf thing, for sure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
And no, your grandmother was not nuts with wrapping. She was just overly cautious.

I know it may sound crazy, and I am not the only one in the world who does this, but I squeeze as much air out of the freezer bag as possible, zip it close almost to the end of the zip track, then suck the remaining air out with a straw. Your freezer bag should be hugging the item to be frozen.
Overly cautious vs nuts...a fine line there. The woman wore heels to the park and to vacuum, lol. I loved her, but she had her quirks, like we all do. I think a lot of women back then wore heels all the time, though. :)

I suck with a straw, too. I did that even before I saw that real cooks do it. I just couldn't figure out any other way to get the air out!

Doesn't sound crazy to me. :)

I tried the ziplock bags with the pump and I don't know if mine was faulty or what, but it didn't work at all. So, back to the straw I went.
__________________
Blackitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 02:14 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackitty View Post
I'd love to freeze half-loaves because I usually don't get all the way through a loaf before it begins to stale and end up eating bread when I don't want it, just to use it up.

I figured you had to freeze it whole or nothing. I'm going to do the Half-loaf thing, for sure.
You can freeze a single slice if you want Sometimes I slice a loaf and then freeze the slices. Then I can just thaw as many slices as I want and leave the rest in the freezer.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 02:22 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,119
We can never go through a whole loaf of bread before it would get stale, so all of our bread goes in the freezer. We get the pre-sliced.
__________________

__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bread, recipe

Freezing bread... When you bake bread and want to freeze a loaf, do you pop it straight into the freezer while it's warm or do you wait until it's completely cooled? I'm thinking that when it's warm, there might be more water in there that would lead to freezer burn, but also have this urge to freeze it quickly to keep it soft. I just don't know. Can I just wrap it in plastic wrap and then put it in a normal plastic bread bag or do I need to use big freezer bag? Should I use foil? My grandma always had a bunch of layers of stuff around things she froze- plastic, then paper towel, then more plastic, then foil. Is that necessary or was she just nuts with the wrapping? I know I'm reaching here, but...could I maybe take it out of the oven a few minutes early, freeze, and then pop it back in the oven to thaw/warm later? Or would that just ruin everything? Any answer to any of my multiple questions will be much appreciated. I am falling in love with home-made bread. :) 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.