"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-15-2011, 06:53 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
German Stollen Bread

I tried making German Stollen Bread and bombed, it didn't rise and the dough was very dense. I baked it anyway and it came out like a hockey puck. Any help.....

__________________

__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 07:58 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,156
It would help if you'd post your recipe (or source for the recipe). I have made Stollen, not for a long time, but I have (someplace in my files) a TNT Stollen recipe.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 01:32 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
CWA4322:

Here it my recipe for German Stollen Bread: Please help

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 2/3 cup warm milk (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/3 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1/3 cup butter, softened
  • 2 1/2 cups bread flour
  • 1/3 cup currants
  • 1/3 cup sultana raisins
  • 1/3 cup red candied cherries, quartered
  • 2/3 cup diced candied citron
Directions

  1. In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in warm milk. Let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the yeast mixture with the egg, white sugar, salt, butter, and 2 cups bread flour; beat well. Add the remaining flour, 1/4 cup at a time, stirring well after each addition. When the dough has begun to pull together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead in the currants, raisins, dried cherries, and citrus peel. Continue kneading until smooth, about 8 minutes.
  3. Lightly oil a large bowl, place the dough in the bowl, and turn to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 1 hour. DID NOT RISE 10-15-11
  4. Lightly grease a cookie sheet. Deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. Fold the dough over to cover it; pinch the seams together to seal. Place the loaf, seam side down, on the prepared baking sheet. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise until doubled in volume, about 40 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  5. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C), and bake for a further 30 to 40 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow loaf to cool on a wire rack.
Please notice my note on #3 I notated that it did not rise. Thanks for any assistance.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 01:42 PM   #4
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,413
I would say there is a strong probability that the milk was too hot. It is also possible that the yeast was bad.

Have you used the yeast to make other breads? Did you use a thermometer to measure the temperature of the milk?

.40
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 01:54 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
I did use a thermometer, at first the milk was 120 degrees, so I put it out side and thought I cooled it down enough, would it taint the milk if I originally made it to hot then cooled it down? I just used the yeast last week for "regular" bread so I don't think that was an issue. Although, now that I am reading your post, something did no seem right when I added the yeast, no bubbling went on? It did not seam to dissolve correctly? What do you think?

Congrats Forty Caliber on a Ranger victory for our Tigers. Hope your team goes all the way and takes the World Series.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 01:36 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Bolas De Fraile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,191
PP I heat the milk and stick my finger in it to test the temp, it should be just hot enough to leave said finger in liquid. I then put a tsp of sugar in, then the yeast mix and leave till it gets a good frothy head. I then sift the flour and salt into a bowl make a well and pour the yeast liquid in the add the beaten eggs and soft butter, mix together then add the dried fruit ect and knead. I put home made pistachio M/pan in the middle of mine.
__________________
I was married by a judge, I should have asked for a jury.
Bolas De Fraile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 06:59 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,156
I think you got your answer. It sounds as if the milk was too warm and killed the yeast. You should always get the bubbly-foamy reaction when setting up your yeast.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 07:53 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Also note the related recipe link
A Good Appetite - A Holiday Stollen That Will Stay Moist - NYTimes.com
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 03:02 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
PP I heat the milk and stick my finger in it to test the temp, it should be just hot enough to leave said finger in liquid. I then put a tsp of sugar in, then the yeast mix and leave till it gets a good frothy head. I then sift the flour and salt into a bowl make a well and pour the yeast liquid in the add the beaten eggs and soft butter, mix together then add the dried fruit ect and knead. I put home made pistachio M/pan in the middle of mine.
Bolas, thank you for this process, I will try again, I believe I have a good recipe, just a bad cook. The "original" recipe called for marzipan in the middle, I never had any with that in the middle, so I left it out. It sounds good, will add it this time.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 03:03 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Thank you for this web site, it was very informative, copied it for reference.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 03:11 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
PP I heat the milk and stick my finger in it to test the temp, it should be just hot enough to leave said finger in liquid. I then put a tsp of sugar in, then the yeast mix and leave till it gets a good frothy head. I then sift the flour and salt into a bowl make a well and pour the yeast liquid in the add the beaten eggs and soft butter, mix together then add the dried fruit ect and knead. I put home made pistachio M/pan in the middle of mine.

Also Bolas, the recipe calls for kneading for 8 minutes, is this length of time necessary.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 03:12 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I think you got your answer. It sounds as if the milk was too warm and killed the yeast. You should always get the bubbly-foamy reaction when setting up your yeast.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 06:47 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,156
Bolas--my grandmother taught me that trick--but she'd go so far as to put a few drops on the inside of her wrist as if checking the temperature for a baby's bottle.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2011, 02:44 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Bolas De Fraile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierogi Princess View Post
Also Bolas, the recipe calls for kneading for 8 minutes, is this length of time necessary.
The prob you have asking me that question is I have been baking breads for a long long time and the touch and look of the dough tells me when to stop. I taught bread making at a night school yrs ago and tried to instil in my victims that most people have failures at the start. PP your confidence will grow.

Cws the funny thing is my Mum was a great cook who could not make bread.Blood temp is 98.6 f and milk at that temp will work fine as your gran knew, it may take longer but increasing the heat for speed could be a dangerous mistake.
I agree with accurate weights and measures ect in patisserie, bread making is made out to be to complex in my book.
__________________
I was married by a judge, I should have asked for a jury.
Bolas De Fraile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2011, 09:10 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
The prob you have asking me that question is I have been baking breads for a long long time and the touch and look of the dough tells me when to stop. I taught bread making at a night school yrs ago and tried to instil in my victims that most people have failures at the start. PP your confidence will grow.

Cws the funny thing is my Mum was a great cook who could not make bread.Blood temp is 98.6 f and milk at that temp will work fine as your gran knew, it may take longer but increasing the heat for speed could be a dangerous mistake.
I agree with accurate weights and measures ect in patisserie, bread making is made out to be to complex in my book.
I wish I could find a bread making class, no one seams to be interested in cooking or baking anymore. I wish you lived in the US or at least vacationed here long enough for a class or two. Bread I have discovered is tricky.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2011, 09:36 AM   #16
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,763
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Although, now that I am reading your post, something did no seem right when I added the yeast, no bubbling went on? It did not seam to dissolve correctly? What do you think?
If the yeast doesn't bubble, the bread isn't going to rise. Simple as that.

As for how long you need to knead any bread, a very recognizable rule of thumb is when you're finished kneading, your dough should be supple and soft at the same time, like a baby's bottom. Eight minutes is definitely not an unreasonable length of time to expect to knead the dough, and if you're using other than white flour, quite a bit longer than eight minutes will be required.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2011, 01:21 PM   #17
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Thanks for the info Chef June, I am going to try the Stollen bread again today, wish me luck. Your advise is great and I will let you know how or IF it turns out.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2011, 05:04 PM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 45
Try adding brandied raisins and currants in stollen, it's delicious! To brandy them yourself:
Boil hot water, pour enough just to cover the raisins, cranberries, etc.
Let cool, then add in brandy, however much you like.
Store in a glass jar (I keep mine in the fridge).
When ready to use, drain out the liquid but keep the fruits plump and moist.
It's best made an year in advance, but if you do it today, it'll still taste pretty good by Christmas. I learned this from an British friend who makes fruitcakes, and I used her trick to make the best stollen I've ever tasted.
__________________
chocotuile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2011, 07:33 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Columbus Township, MI
Posts: 145
Brandied raisins and currants sound wonderful, guess what I am going to get at the store tomorrow. I have raisins but no currants. Thanks for the tip. I will make a good stollen bread if it kills me. Also, can you share your Christmas fruit cake recipe, my husband loves it and I have made it a couple of times and it is ok. He had some from a friends mom when he was younger and said it was wonderful. Thanks in advance.
__________________
If you ever get the choice to sit it out or dance, I HOPE YOU DANCE.
Pierogi Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2011, 07:36 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by chocotuile View Post
Try adding brandied raisins and currants in stollen, it's delicious! To brandy them yourself:
Boil hot water, pour enough just to cover the raisins, cranberries, etc.
Let cool, then add in brandy, however much you like.
Store in a glass jar (I keep mine in the fridge).
When ready to use, drain out the liquid but keep the fruits plump and moist.
It's best made an year in advance, but if you do it today, it'll still taste pretty good by Christmas. I learned this from an British friend who makes fruitcakes, and I used her trick to make the best stollen I've ever tasted.
I'd be tempted to drink the brandy or throw it in with a pork roast...
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bread, flour, milk, recipe, yeast

German Stollen Bread I tried making German Stollen Bread and bombed, it didn't rise and the dough was very dense. I baked it anyway and it came out like a hockey puck. Any help.....:ohmy: 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×