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Old 09-25-2004, 04:38 AM   #11
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Your loaf looks brilliant OC! Magnificent! Jealous as hell, but I'm closing in.

Your pics are of great benefit as we plebs can see that to which we aspire.

Brooksy
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Old 09-26-2004, 10:51 PM   #12
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Made my own best-ever bread tonight. It wasn't in a bread loaf though. Let me explain.

I had a hankering for recreating those wonderful gradeschool wonders from my childhood - pigs-in-the-blanket. I've heard many variations of foods that have carried this name, but to me, it represents a hot dog rolled in fresh bread dough and baked to a light, golden-brown perfection. The bread must be soft and moist, slightly sweet, and slightly yeasty with just a hint of salt. It came out perfect. My success came after reading the success story in this thread.

I measured two cups all-purpose flour into a large bowl. I added three level tsp. or 1 tbs. dry yeast to the flour, along with 6 tsp. sugar, and 1 tsp. salt. I stired it with a wire whisk until all inredients were equally distributed. I then added 2/3 cup hot water and 6 tbs. cooking oil. I stirred it with a wooden spoon until it came together as a dough. It was just a tad dry so I drizzled a splash more water into the bowl and kneeded it by hand for no more than 7 miinutes. The dough was elastic and I didn't want it tough so I spread butter all over the dough surface and placed it is the microwave for 15 seconds on high, to heat the dough to a good rising temperature. I let it sit for 30 minutes and checked it. It had doubled. I rolled it out on a floured surface and wrapped the hot dogs in the dough, after cutting dough sections to the right size. Iput them on a microwave safe plate and heated again for 15 seconds. AFter 15 more minutes, I moved the pigs to a dookie sheet and baked at 400 degrees for 15 minutes. They came out sooooo good. My family wants me to get this recipe down because they loved the bread portion.

I believe the success came from not developing the gluten to its fullest, and making sure the dough was elastic, and slightly sticky. Teh rest was basic ingedients. Big success tonight. Gotta love it when your improptu recipe goes well. Gotta try this as a small bread loaf, maybe a free standing loaf, like grinder bread.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-27-2004, 12:53 PM   #13
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Those pigs-in-a-blankett sound great, Goodweed of the North I'm pleased and flattered that you think my post may have helped.

You really surprised me with the use of the microwave to warm the dough. Never heard of that, and I'd presumed the microwave radiation would tend to destroy yeast cells. Big surprise! Gotta try it.

The more I get into this bread thing, the more I am convinced the long held and wide spread belief that bread making is time-consuming, tedious, and a chore is really an old wives tale. Personally, I think it is very easy, and kinda fun. Now, if your microwave idea speeds up the rising time, tat will further simplify the process.
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Old 09-27-2004, 02:41 PM   #14
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I agree, oldcoot. Don't make much bread myself, but the few times I have I found it enjoyable and relaxing, with usually pretty good results.

Just think back to the pioneer days. With all the other stuff those women had to do in and out of the kitchen, they still managed to crank out the daily bread. No worries about moisture content, right amount of yeast, etc.
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Old 09-28-2004, 12:19 AM   #15
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Just a note of thanks here. Goodweed, OldCoot...I have really gained a lot from you in this post. I make bread often (3-4 times a week) and you have helped me more in this discussion than you know. Thank you!
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Old 09-29-2004, 12:07 AM   #16
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In the short time I've known and shared recipes on this site, I have found extraordinary people with open and quick minds. I do well with bread, but am not as good as I'd like to be. Sometimes, as with the pigs in the blanket, the bread comes out very good. Other times, I have been stuck with very heavy, even plastic textured bread (expecially when trying to make low-wheat varieties).

Multi-grain breads come out pretty good.

And as I stated in my post, the key part of the process for me was the stickiness of the dough. That textile feel ldt me know that there was enough moisture in the doug. Also, I measured about three tbs. oil per cup of flour to insure a moist final product. The raw dough texture info was given me by Old Coot in his posting. At one time, I knew that. But over the years, I forgot.

And Audeo, you are very welcome.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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