"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-28-2008, 10:53 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
Help Choosing A Grain Mill

Does anyone here grind their own grains for bread?

I’m trying to choose a good grain mill and I could use some advice.

__________________

__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2008, 06:13 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
How much grain do you need to mill at a time? Try to be specific (eg - X number of cups OR X number of pounds)

Do you want a mill that can both crack grain and mill flour?

Do you want a mill that can make whole wheat pastry flour as well as bread flour?

Do you want a mill that can also handle legumes (for example, soybeans for soy flour) or will you only mill grain?

Do you have a preference for an electric or a manual mill?

What is the maximum you're willing to pay?

What about storage? does the mill need to be stored between uses or do you have space so it can always be out, ready for use?

================
If you can be more specific about your needs, you will get better advice.
__________________

subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2008, 07:20 AM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,511
1. 150 lbs.
2. Just flour and meal
3 Just regular wheat flour
4. Yes
5. Electric
6. Whatever it takes
7 Either option would be ok.
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2008, 09:17 AM   #4
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
How much grain do you need to mill at a time? Try to be specific (eg - X number of cups OR X number of pounds)
1 pound

Do you want a mill that can both crack grain and mill flour?
yes

Do you want a mill that can make whole wheat pastry flour as well as bread flour?
yes

Do you want a mill that can also handle legumes (for example, soybeans for soy flour) or will you only mill grain?
Corn and beans as well as grain

Do you have a preference for an electric or a manual mill?
electric

What is the maximum you're willing to pay?
$300.00

What about storage? does the mill need to be stored between uses or do you have space so it can always be out, ready for use?
Space is not a problem; I have a large kitchen with a lot of cabnet and store area; but I don't want something that will be too big for me to handle alone.
__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 01:56 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
I guess I'll just order the book "Flour Power" it's supposed to be really good.

I've also seen that Peter Reinhart has a new book out on whole grains; I guess I'll check that one out as well.
__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 06:51 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,511
Miss Betty...Check out this link. I'm not recommending these items, but it may give you some ideas...There are many other sites to see and read. I'm currently negotiating with a lady for a 24" Meadows Stone Mill. It is overkill for sure, but I sure would like to have the mill. I know the history of it, and it has ground a lot of corn meal and wheat flour for me over the years. The owner recently passed away. Good luck!

Grain Mill Nutrimill Bosch Mixer Bosch Mixers Wheat Flour Grinder Mills Family Grain Mill Best Buy Ultramill Ultra Mill
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 07:24 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central UK.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
I grow and also mill my own wheat (as well as Barley and Rye).
I use a simple coffee grinder to do mine but I have to do it in a couple of batches at a time.
but it`s not really a problem as there`s only 3 of us and I only make 1 loaf at a time or a dozen buns.
__________________
Katherine Snow. xx
YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 10:17 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Miss Betty...Check out this link. I'm not recommending these items, but it may give you some ideas...There are many other sites to see and read. I'm currently negotiating with a lady for a 24" Meadows Stone Mill. It is overkill for sure, but I sure would like to have the mill. I know the history of it, and it has ground a lot of corn meal and wheat flour for me over the years. The owner recently passed away. Good luck!
Holy cow Uncle Bob!!! Good luck!!!! Let me know how it comes out.

I’ve been doing research on the subject for several days now and I feel like my brain is going to fall out. My son is much better at research than I am so I’m thinking that I may just turn this over to him. I know that’s the lazy way out but isn't that what kids are for?

There is an UltraMill on Ebay that I’m looking at.

What part of Mississippi are you from? My dad is from Picayune; he’s one of the Smith’s from Picayune. I haven’t been there in more years than I like to think of. We still own property there; my Uncle has been taking care of the place. He’s getting pretty old now and although he hasn’t said anything I think he’s about ready to pass the job onto one of the younger crowd; I’m thinking my brother.

I don’t know why they are so set on hanging onto the old home place my Grandmother has been gone for almost 20 years now; it's hard to let go of your roots I suppose.
__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2008, 08:18 AM   #9
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
recommendations

Quote:
Originally Posted by BettyR View Post
How much grain do you need to mill at a time? Try to be specific (eg - X number of cups OR X number of pounds)
1 pound
Do you want a mill that can both crack grain and mill flour?
yes
Do you want a mill that can make whole wheat pastry flour as well as bread flour?
yes
Do you want a mill that can also handle legumes (for example, soybeans
for soy flour) or will you only mill grain?
Corn and beans as well as grain
Do you have a preference for an electric or a manual mill?
electric
What is the maximum you're willing to pay?
$300.00
What about storage? does the mill need to be stored between uses or do you have space so it can always be out, ready for use?
Space is not a problem; I have a large kitchen with a lot of cabnet and store area; but I don't want something that will be too big for me to handle alone.
Given your needs and your price point, your best bet is one of the micronizer type electric mills on the market for the home user, such as the Nutrimill (which I own) or the Wondermill (formerly marketed as Whispermill). You will *not* be able to produce cracked grain in a micronizer mill. If you only occasionally need cracked grain in smaller quantities (1 or two cups), you could use a blender or food processor. Or you could purchase a small, inexpensive manual grain grinder for this purpose.

Micronizer mills are rated to handle legumes as well as grain. The Nutrimill, while rather large, is light weight and easily handled by one person. I assume the same goes for the Wondermill.

The Wondermill has two separate components, the milling mechanism and the flour receptacle, which connects to the milling mechanism with a short tube


In contrast, the Nutrimill is "all in one", with the removable flour bin at the base of the unit. I prefer the Nutrimill over the Wondermill because of the design.


Slightly less expensive micronizer mills on the market for the home miller that are a "all in one" design include the Ultramill Grain Mill (made by Bosch)

and the BlendTek

I have not researched evaulations for either the Ultramill or the Blendtek.

Less expensive micronizer mills generally have a smaller capacity (not a concern for you, as you only want to mill about 1 pound of grain at a time) and may be significantly louder. A plus is that their physical size is smaller. It is important to check out the warranty for each brand *in detail* before purchase. Also, it is advisable to do a 'net research for reviews and owner opinions.

Here are links to two extensive reviews of micronizer mills (Nutrimill and Wondermill) which you should find helpful.

This one kernals or berries??????]www.thefreshloaf.com - discussion and evaluation of grain mills is by an individual who is both a home baker and a small scale commercial baker who has used many mills targeted for the home baker and/or small scale bakery.

This one kernals or berries??????]www.thefreshloaf.com - Nutrimill grain mill - a home baker's perspective is my review of the Nutrimill after owning (and using) it for about 6 months.

===============
please post back to this thread if you have further questions
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2008, 11:50 AM   #10
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona View Post
Given your needs, your best bet is one of the micronizer type electric mills on the market for the home user, such as the Nutrimill (which I own) or the Wondermill (formerly marketed as Whispermill). You will *not* be able to produce cracked grain in a micronizer mill. If you only occasionally need cracked grain in smaller quantities (1 or two cups), you could use a blender or food processor. Or you could purchase a small, inexpensive manual grain grinder for this purpose.

Micronizer mills are rated to handle legumes as well as grain. The Nutrimill, while rather large, is light weight and easily handled by one person. I assume the same goes for the Wondermill.

The Wondermill has two separate components, the milling mechanism and the flour receptacle, which connects to the milling mechanism with a hose


In contrast, the Nutrimill is "all in one", with the removable flour bin at the base of the unit. I prefer the Nutrimill over the Wondermill because of the design.


Here are links to two extensive reviews of micronizer mills (Nutrimill and Wondermill) which you should find helpful.

This one kernals or berries??????]www.thefreshloaf.com - discussion of micronizer mills is by an individual who is both a home baker and a small scale commercial baker who has used many mills of this type.

This one kernals or berries??????]www.thefreshloaf.com - Nutrimill grain mill - a home baker's perspective is my review of the Nutrimill after owning (and using) it for about 6 months.

===============
please post back to this thread if you have further questions
Thank you subfuscpersona,

I really enjoyed reading the posts on the Fresh Loaf forum.

From my research I've decided to go with an Ultramill and a Marcato Marga Mulino Grain Crusher / Flaker.

I found both at a little online hippie juicer shop for a really good price. I got the Ultramill for making really fine flour and the Crusher / Flaker for making courser ground flour, meals, cereals and rolled oats. I was able to get both for a little less than I would have paid for a Nutrimill.

Thank you for your help, I'm looking forward to some hearty loaves of bread and bowls of good cereal.

Now what I need it some online sources for ordering grain.

Thank you,
Betty
__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2008, 05:30 PM   #11
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
web mail order sources for bulk grain & grain storage supplies

Quote:
Originally Posted by BettyR View Post
Now what I need it some online sources for ordering grain. Betty
Bakers who can get grain from a local coop or natural foods market realize the best cost savings. Many posters to Welcome to the Fresh Loaf | The Fresh Loaf report that their coop or natural foods market is quite willing to special order grain for them.

If you must mail order, you will realize cost savings if you can order in bulk (25 pound or 50 pound bag of grain) even with shipping costs but do also consider how you'll store the grain and whether you need also to purchase special containers. Your geographical location (assuming you're in the US) is also a consideration if you must mail order as that severely affects shipping costs.

For maps of the major grain growing regions of the US, see Maps of the US showing the major wheat growing regions www.thefreshloaf.com

Since you live in Texas, you may want to consider special storage containers to protect bulk grain against prolonged periods of humidity plus high temperatures - visit Grain Mill Nutrimill Bosch Mixer Bosch Mixers Wheat Flour Grinder Mills Family Grain Mill Best Buy Ultramill Ultra Mill for info on gamma seal food storage buckets

Mail order grain sources
Wheat Montana, Grains, Breads, Bakery and Deli
Powdered Dried Whole Eggs - Freeze Dried Fruit - Blanched Almond Flour - Steel Cut Oats - Honeyville Grain, Inc.
Sun Organic Farm
Bluebird Grain Farms
eBay Store - Native Foods: Montana Wheat, Whole Rye, Hopi Blue Corn

Again, do check shipping costs if ordering grain on-line.
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2008, 06:55 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: northern Michigan in the forest, overlooking a waterfall
Posts: 147
milling your own

I've been milling my own flour since 1966. For years I had a stone grinder, back when they didn't have good designs. It was very inconvenient. Got it from Utah, but it lasted for 35 years. It took 30 min. to grind 5 # of whole wheat. And yes, I even had a Corona Hand Mill for a couple of years(hand grinder) when I lived where there was no electricity.
Then I got the Ultramill 2 years ago. I hesitated for a long time because it was not a stone grinder and I'd always heard that the stainless grinders heated up the grain too much, but the Ultra does not do that. It grinds rapidly. I can grind enough to make a 2 # loaf in about 30 seconds. I love it!
xmascarol1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2008, 06:10 AM   #13
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
flour temperature after milling

Quote:
Originally Posted by xmascarol1 View Post
... I got the Ultramill 2 years ago. I hesitated for a long time because it was not a stone grinder and I'd always heard that the stainless grinders heated up the grain too much, but the Ultra does not do that.
Heat buildup when milling flour can be an issue with large commercial mills. In my experience it is not an issue with micronizer mills designed for home use. This is yet another example of misapplying information to get some good advertising copy.

Around 140F seems to be the magic number most cited where heat buildup can start damaging heat susceptible vitamins. I did a number of temperature tests of the freshly milled flour when I first got my Nutrimill.

I measured the flour's heat with a digital thermometer as soon as milling was finished. The milling settings and the quantity of grain (2 pounds) were the same for each test; the type of grain was the only variable. The harder the grain, the higher the temperature (makes sense!). However, even the hardest grain (hard spring wheat) only reached 130F while softer grain (rye, for example) only reached 100F.

If the home miller is at all concerned with flour heat, simply removing the lid of the flour receptacle and giving the flour a quick stir (or pouring it into a another bowl) quickly dissipates any heat.
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2008, 07:31 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
If you have a KA mixer, they now make a grain mill attachment I'm told
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2008, 06:50 AM   #15
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
Retsel Mill-rite grain mill

If I had the money and the space, the USA-made Retsel Mill-rite grain mill would be my first choice, due to it's versatility (cracked grain to fine flour). I tracked grain mill reviews for about 20 years (mid 1980s to mid 2000s) and the Retsel consistently got good reviews for quality construction and durability. The Retsel Mill-rite has an electric motor, which is really required for milling grain in any quantity.



If you don't specify preference, the Retsel ships with stone ceramic grinding plates, which are suitable for most types of grain. To mill oily seeds (such as legumes, nuts and *field corn*) the optional stainless steel grinding plates may be purchased.

At about $400 retail, this grain mill is for the serious home milling enthusiast. While advertised for "home use", I would think this unit might also be suitable for a small, specialized bakery or a coop that wishes to mill grain for it's members.

Retsel's home page for their Mill-rite mill is here

Two reviews of the Retsel are here and here

At times this unit does appear on eBay and generally sells for considerably less than retail. If you're not in a hurry to buy and are comfortable using eBay I would recommend it as a possible source.

SF [766]
======== update Apr 29, 2008 ==========
======== going price for a Retsel on eBay ========
A Retsel Mil-rite electric mill sold on eBay for $275 (plus shipping) on Apr 22nd. The mill came with an extra large hopper to hold grain.

I was curious what people were willing to pay for a USA made Retsel so I tracked the auction. (I have no connection with the seller.)

I'm posting a link to the auction's photo of the Retsel, though the link may not work after a week or two.
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2008, 05:16 PM   #16
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
Thank you Subfuscpersona for the information.

I purchased a Nutrimill and so far I’ve been very pleased with the way it works. I like the superfine flour that I get from it.
__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2008, 10:23 PM   #17
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
? evaluation of Marcato Grain Crusher / Flaker

Quote:
Originally Posted by BettyR on 02-01-2008
From my research I've decided to go with an Ultramill and a Marcato Marga Mulino Grain Crusher / Flaker... I got ...the Crusher / Flaker for making coarser ground flour, meals, cereals and rolled oats.
Have you used the Marcato Grain Crusher / Flaker that you purchased?
Quote:
MARCATO MARGA MULINO Roller mill for cereal for use in the home, for producing flour, whole meal, flakes and bran.


I would be very interested in how you've used it and your opinion about how well it performed.

Thanks - SF
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2008, 10:07 AM   #18
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
No I haven’t purchased one yet and I’m not sure if I will.

I decided to get the Nutrimill and learn to use it first and then I would make up my mind about what I would get for doing courser ground flour and other grains.

I’m giving some serious thought to the Country Living Grain Mill, I could do corn as well as wheat and just about anything else you can think of.
__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2008, 04:37 PM   #19
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
I'm confused. Didn't you say you purchased an Ultramill and the Marcato Grain Crusher/Flaker?
Quote:
Originally Posted by BettyR on 02-01-2008
From my research I've decided to go with an Ultramill and a Marcato Marga Mulino Grain Crusher / Flaker...I found both at a little online hippie juicer shop for a really good price. I got the Ultramill for making really fine flour and the Crusher / Flaker for making courser ground flour, meals, cereals and rolled oats. I was able to get both for a little less than I would have paid for a Nutrimill.
Now it seems you've purchased a Nutrimill?

?????????? what have you actually bought ??????????
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2008, 05:38 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
What I said was that I was planning to buy those mills, I placed my order for the Ultramill and the Marga but was later informed that the manufacturer of the Ultramill was not producing any mills at that time because they were moving to a larger facility and it would be April or May before they would be in production and shipping again.

I didn’t want to wait that long for an Ultramill so I canceled the whole order and went with the Nutrimill; I didn’t order the Marga from the same place as the Nutrimill because the shipping for the Nutrimill was free because it was over the specified amount to get free shipping but they were going to charge me shipping for the Marga even though I was going to order them at the same time so I just didn’t get the Marga.

Now I’m glad I didn’t because I’ve talked to several people who have them and they ended up tossing them into a closet and buying the Country Living Grain Mill because the Marga had such limited use.
__________________

__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
grain mill, grind flour

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×