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Old 06-24-2008, 03:37 PM   #1
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Exclamation Hitachi HB-B201 Home Bakery Plus - Need Manual/recipes

So, I finally broke down and bought a bread machine to try and start making my own breads. Just simple stuff.
It is a Hitachi HB-B201 Automatic Home Bakery Plus, no manual. Looked around on the net and it appears lots of people are searching for the user manuals on these, and the only reliable source for them wants money.
But I did find out that any basic recipe that calls for 3 cups flour will work, and that it loads liquids then dry then yeast.
So, Anybody have any experience with this machine that can either share a manual in PDF format, or has any recipes for it?
Any recipes that will work in it are welcome, as well as instructions on how to load it, what settings to use, etc would be great.
Basically lets start out with basic white, whole wheat, oat, that kind of thing until I have a better understanding of how it all works and what it can do.
I am planning on going out shopping tomorrow to Whole Foods, so a list of ingredients needed and recipes would be great so I know what to pick up at the store.
Thanks!

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Old 06-24-2008, 03:53 PM   #2
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Here's one for the HB-B101. I know it's not the same model number, but probably still similar. Might be worth taking a look at.

http://www.larrylynchimages.com/ftp/HB-B101Manual.pdf
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Old 06-24-2008, 04:09 PM   #3
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Looks very simular so I did download and save it, thanks! The most important part was the care and usage parts. There are only two buttons I am still not sure about: Rice and Jam. But, I will read thru the manual later tonight and familiarize myself with it.
I have started with the recipe on the side of the maker and it is going now! We will see how it turns out.
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Old 06-24-2008, 04:46 PM   #4
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Re-reading my post I think I need to be more specific, and after reading the manual I have a better idea what I need answers to. So here it is broken down, hopefully all our bread people will be here soon and this will help them and me:

Recipes: Not looking for specific recipes but feel free to post em. I am looking for knowledge on how to determine what recipes will work in my machine and what ones won't. IE the basic recipe on the side of the machine uses 2 cups flour. The manual says up to 3 cup recipes, so as I cruise DC looking at bread recipes I will be able to tell which ones will work good in my machine by? IE matching recipes to my machine volume wise.

Buttons:
Bread: Figured that one out, takes 4hrs 10min to make a loaf of bread on this setting.
Color: Color of the crust, got it.
Bread Rapid: Makes a loaf of bread in half the time. OK, but does that take a different recipe? And if not, why would one ever use the regular setting when they can do it quicker?
Mix Bread: This is for recipes that call for added ingredients like nuts or raisins. It will tell you when it is time to add them. OK got it.
Rice: Huh?
Jam: Huh?

That is about it. Also any tips or tricks ya'll use on machines like this or anyone with experience with one of these please feel free to chime in, I will take all the help I can get. As I stated before, I want to start out making whole wheat and whole oat bread on a regular basis. Later I would like to expand into things like raisin bread or nut breads stuff like that.
Thanks!
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Old 06-24-2008, 07:09 PM   #5
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I've just been making your basic white bread in my machine and love it. One thing I can answer, as I just found it out myself, is that using the rapid cycle makes a moister, more dense loaf. My current loaf I am eating was done that way, with all ingredients and measurements remaining the same. My machine takes 3:18:00 for the "long version" and knocks an hour off for the rapid cycle. I won't hesitate to use the rapid cycle again, but it takes longer to make toast, the texture of grilled garlic bread is different, it's just a different bread. Probably great for sandiches.

Another thing I found out is that you want to take the loaf out of the pan as soon as it's done, or it will turn into a "crusty bread". Even though the machine shuts off it keeps right on cooking and the crust will turn way to hard.

One of the tricks I read somewhere is to not use cold water. Maybe it slows down the instant yeast or something. I think I read 102F is ideal. I just go by feel so it isn't warm, but not cold either. Then when I add my butter I cut it into thin slices rather than using soft butter like my usual recipe calls for. It all seems to mix well.

I think I read somewhere too that it is good to fluff the flour a bit before putting it in the measuring cup.... if that is what you are using. Katie E uses a scale, as humidity and flour can change your bread, but I've been doing it with measuring cups and spoons and having good luck (for me). I have a large spoon that I scoop the flour with in its plastic container to "loosen" or fluff it, then I spoon the fluffed stuff into the measuring cup and use the handle of the spoon to level it off. I think that gives me a reasonably close to the same measurement each time. But......

But as the dough is kneading you may have to add more flour or water if your measurements were off a bit. It should feel tacky, like tape. Water will add to the tackiness, flour taketh away. And it doesn't take much.

This is just general, layman stuff that I've come across. I didn't look up you machine or read the directions link that was posted.

Oh, and "jam".... that is what you press if your loaf sticks to the pan and you can't dump it out. It will unjam it......
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Old 06-24-2008, 07:28 PM   #6
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Cool thanks. I did the long cycle using the directions on the side for a basic white loaf. So lets see, I used cold water, didn't cut the butter, oh and probably not exact on the flour measurements.

We will have to see how it turns out, LOL.
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Old 06-24-2008, 07:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
We will have to see how it turns out, LOL.
There's always homemade croutons
Just be sure to cut a slice while it's still warm. Deelish.

Once you get her dialed in, the next challenge is how to keep the loaf fresh. With kids that shouldn't be a problem going through bread, but you only have a little salt for the preservative. Wrap it too tight and it gets moldy, too loose and it goes stale.
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Old 06-24-2008, 07:58 PM   #8
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I can make a suggestion - take out about 1/4 cup or a bit more of the liquid and add a good evoo. Just use the "mix" cycle and not the bake cycle. I do add a healthy amount of freshly chopped rosemary too. I like to use a bread machine mix for just a Country White. Place your dough, misshapen and all, on a heated stone. Bake in your oven for about 25 minutes or so ( sometimes the box will tell you) and use as foccacia. Just watch it for times.

When I shape it I will add the thumb prints, some kosher salt, and sometimes kalamata olive halves. This is GREAT for dunking or even a pannino.
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Old 06-24-2008, 08:06 PM   #9
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OK, I have a Cycle button. It can be set to mix, mix + first rise, mix + first rise + second rise, and mix + first rise + second rise + bake.
For yours, I would go thru mix and both rises, using EVOO instead of the water, then take out, add some rosemary, lump into the oven and bake? Does sound good, like one of those artesian breads kinda. And perfect for dinner.
I like the idea of making breads for supper, like what Elfie described, but if the quick cycle makes a decent loaf bread for sandwiches that is good too. But for now just like Pacanis said, I want it done just before supper so I can slice it up and serve it right then and there. And I like whole grain breads the most.
Oh, and what heat? 350F?
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Old 06-24-2008, 09:55 PM   #10
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Bread came out good. Plain white so nothing spectacular, but it was good. This was a 2 cups flour recipe and it was just about the perfect amount for us for having with dinner, no leftovers so no worries about preserving it.
I am going to whole foods tomorrow to pick up some whole wheat flour and maybe some good oat flour, plus some more yeast as I only have 2 packets left (can you believe they are from almost 3 years ago and worked fine??).
I can't wait to try Elfies method as well, I described it to DW and she can't wait either! And so many bread recipes to go thru on here! LOL.

One quick question: Can I do some of these pizza dough, cinnamon roll, or other more exotic doughs in mine as well? I know I can just set it to mix, or mix plus one rise or two rise, so I am thinking I can but how many rises do I do (some of the recipes don't say).
Thanks!
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