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Old 04-08-2008, 03:47 PM   #71
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Ok, yesterday's disaster/resurrection was actually a 2-part fiasco. I started out trying to make hot dog and hamburger buns, but I also mixed up a recipe for "Refrigerator Dough For Quick Crusty Hard Rolls" that I downloaded from the King Arthur website. You'll have to look it up on thier website, because I CAN'T POST LINKS UNTIL I GROW UP! At 57 I thought I would get a little more leeway than that. Hmmmm... you folks must have had problems in the past to invoke a 20 post rule. Whatever...

It's a 24-hour dough using only 1/2t of instant yeast, and it tastes just fine. The rolls and buns came out just ok, but I was expecting them to raise a lot more than they did, and there was virtually no oven spring. Yesterday's dough (pre disaster) had almost twice the rise of this recipe, and I even let these raise for 1-1/2 hours, and I did it in the oven with a pot of boiling hot water in the bottom of the oven compartment. All I got was a so-so rise with a bunch of holes in the surface.

They have a nice crunchy texture to them, but don't look for a big rise. We'll be eating them tonight with some natural casing weiners and baked beans. Here's what they looked like pre & post baked:





Here are a couple of bonus pictures of a great kitchen I just finished installing Madiera Gold granite countertops in, along with new stainless steel appliances and range hood. She's excited to start cooking with her new tops and toys.



Here's her Franke sink with the grating system..to die for! Not for the light of pocket book.




Joe
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Old 04-08-2008, 09:56 PM   #72
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What a beautiful kitchen-----you did yourself proud, JV!!!

As for your dough I think that you need to start over again with NEW yeast----even if the package says it's not expired yet. The quickest way to tell if your yeast is active is to "proof it". This can be done by filling a tall glass with 1/4 cup warm water (not hot) mixed with a teaspoon of sugar. Pour the yeast on top and gently stir in---I use a chopstick. Cover with Saran wrap and place in a warm place for 15 minutes. If your yeast is active (good) it will have bubbled and made a foamy top---if not then it's not good and your bread won't rise like it's supposed to or not at all. I keep my yeast in the fridge to prolong its life. Then add the yeast sponge to your recipe minus the 1/4 liquid from the rest of your liquid ingredients. In other words if the recipe calls for 1 cup of milk then add 3/4 milk, etc.

As for the postings----you will be at 25000 in no time and not even realize it. If you really want to rack up fast then play the online games that DC has "Answer a Question with a Question", "Food Game", etc., they're fun with fun people......Warning this site is addicting.....
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Old 04-09-2008, 07:00 AM   #73
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expatgirl,

Thanks for your compliment. I enjoy doing remodeling projects for people that are fun to work with, and they usually get freebies thrown in just because they treat me decently. Since I own the business, I refuse to work for mean people or people who are poop heads. Life's too short to spend any of it being miserable. Some might say that money is money, but I think we need to live life to the fullest each and every day, and that does not allow for any time working with dorks. I'm not wealthy, just picky.

I don't think the yeast is bad, because it came from a jar that I made a successful recipe with the same day. It was a refrigerator dough (first time making it) that I probably did something incorrectly with. I've only been making bread for about a month, so most recipes that are new to me sometimes need a bit of tweeking in the execution of them. Fortunately, everything to date has been edible, so I can eat my mistakes. Urp!

Time to get to the paperwork. It's tax time and I need to get it done today.

Joe
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Old 04-09-2008, 08:59 AM   #74
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let's see-------it's April what???????????

Gee, I wished that you lived in the Houston area (well, you probably don't, however) as we are eventually going to have to remodel our kitchen-----it's only 20 years old with the original oven......replaced the range 8 years ago with a flattop------best idea ever.. and you make bread, too? Now I'm impressed.......
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:22 AM   #75
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Joe, if you come remodel my kitchen I will be so nice to you FOREVER that you will feed me to the bees!
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Old 04-09-2008, 03:17 PM   #76
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LOL, I always get these great offers to work for food. They're tempting, but DW doesn't like the idea of me not bringing home the bacon. Sorry, but I'll have to pass. Houston's too hot, but I could be tempted to go to Wisconsin, especially if there's some fly fishing involved. You have a bazillion lakes up there and they're all loaded with good eating fishies. I mainly fish catch & release, but I do like to eat walleye, perch and bluegills. I even have a few simple recipes for them.

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Old 04-09-2008, 04:21 PM   #77
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Finally! I knew if I slowed down and followed the directions I would eventually get a nice end product. I mixed up a batch of the Basic White Bread dough from the Kitchenaid book (no copyright, so I'll post it at the end here) because this recipe has been good to me. Following a 1-hour proof in the oven, I divided up the dough and weighed out 2-1/2 oz portions of dough for the hot dog buns. I rolled them with a rolling pin into a 4"x6"ish rectangle, then rolled them up, pinched the seams and put them on a tray with parchment paper and corn meal. I then rolled out the remaining dough to about 3/8" thick, and took a 3" diameter drinking glass, floured the rim, and cut out discs for the hamburger buns. Surprisingly, these also weighed around 2-1/2 oz each (ish). I proofed the whole batch for another hour, then cooked each pan individually at 400 F for 15 minutes. According to the thermometer they were at 200 F, and looked pretty good to me as far as color.I put them on an open rack and brushed the tops with a bit of butter. Here are the progress shots followed by the recipe. BTW, this recipe makes two loaves of bread or 18 rolls (your choice of configuration). I also convert my volume measurements for flour into weight to maintain consistency with my recipes. This batch was made with Bob's Red Mill unbleached white flour for bread.

Here are the hamburger bun cutouts following proofing:



... the hot dog buns following proofing...



...the finished burger buns...



... and finally the finished hot dog rolls.



Here's the recipe:

Basic White Bread Recipe From KitchenAid Mixer recipe book

2 hours | 1 hour prep | 2 loaves or 18 ea. 2-1/2oz rolls

Ingredients:
1/2 cup milk
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 (1/4 ounce) packages dry active yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water (105F to 115F)
5-6 (29 oz.) cups all-purpose flour (I use bread flour)

1. Combine milk, sugar, salt, and butter in small saucepan. Heat over low heat until butter melts and sugar dissolves. Cool to lukewarm.
2. Dissolve yeast in warm water in warmed bowl. Add lukewarm milk mixture and 4 1/2 cups (22 oz.)flour. Attach bowl and dough hook. Turn to speed 2 and mix 1 minute. Continuing on speed 2, add remaining flour, 1/2 cup (3 oz.) at a time, until dough clings to hook and cleans side of bowl. Knead on speed 2 for 2 minutes longer, or until dough is smooth and elastic. Dough will be slightly sticky to the touch.
3. Place in a greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about an hour.
4. Punch dough down and divide in half. Shape each half into a loaf and place in a greased 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2-inch loaf pan. ( 2-1/2 oz portion of dough for each hot dog roll or hamburger bun) Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
5. Bake at 400 degrees F for 30 minutes (15 minutes for rolls). Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire racks.


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Old 04-09-2008, 05:51 PM   #78
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Nice job Joe!

I just made some last night with KA's recipe, I found it here: bakingsheet: Cooking School: Hot Dog Buns

And I have to say that I really liked her method of rolling the buns, folding the left and right sides of the rectangle in to meet in the middle, then folding the top and bottom to the center. It eliminated most of the pinching that I'm apparently not so good at.
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Old 04-09-2008, 07:20 PM   #79
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Joe, I am drooling over that kitchen, and same basic layout as I have (only she has waaaaaaaaaaaay more space)! I take it from the difference in counter materials that the gold one isn't your home? What makes that sink so pricey? Love the size!

DW is welcome to come here too. The more the merrier! I am not sure about the fly fishing here, most people I know head for the streams in upper Michigan.

Those buns look pretty inviting, especially with that buttery gloss!
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Old 04-09-2008, 07:56 PM   #80
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Wow........Mrs. Buttercrust has a run for her money........
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