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Old 06-08-2008, 12:44 PM   #1
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How do you clean up after bread making

the discussion going about freezing and thawing food is currently discussing thawing safety. It got me thinking. I process my bread on a nylon board. When I am done I lay the board flat in the sink and put liquid idsh soap on it, I mix that around with a brush and while it is still kind of thick, I add some bleach to it. My thinking is that in breadmaking we are dealing with a growing thing. I want tom make sue that the surface that I work it on is sanitary when I start and when I end.

Anyone else take any special precautions?

AC

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Old 06-08-2008, 01:17 PM   #2
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I don't worry that much about it. If I'm cleaning something that has not had contact with raw animal juices, I often just rinse and wipe it with a sponge; I'll just use soap if something really sticks.

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Old 06-08-2008, 02:03 PM   #3
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Nope. I just do a wipe down with my vinegar/water spray and paper towels. The "growing things" in bread are my friends, not my enemy. Different story of course when I play around with chicken.
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Old 06-08-2008, 02:17 PM   #4
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I use a dough cloth. When I'm done I shake it out and toss it in the wash.
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Old 06-08-2008, 04:31 PM   #5
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i have been using no stick foil for final rising of n y bread. clean up is just throwing away the foil. works for me.

babe
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Old 06-08-2008, 05:15 PM   #6
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Hot water, soap and common sense keeps things clean in my kitchen. I clean as I cook and bake, so cleanup is easier than if the tools and bowls and pots & pans are left to dry and harden. It's amazing how much work is eliminated with immediate cleaning, and everything dries quickly with hot water. I worry more about towels left to dry for reuse more than my cutting boards. DW reuses towels (which I toss in the laundry as soon as I take over the kitchen), and I start with fresh towels and toss them in the wash at the end of a cooking session and/or washing dishes (yes, I do share the laundry duties as well as kitchen duties, so I'm not making more work for DW). If the towels or rags or sponges have an odor, they get tossed in the wash or the trash.

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Old 06-08-2008, 07:23 PM   #7
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I'm with you on the towels, Joe. In the kitchen, they live in a warm, humid environment, perfect for incubating bacteria. I don't worry about extra work - one of my few indulgences is sending out my laundry. I go through LOTS of towels and dish clothes.
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Old 06-08-2008, 08:29 PM   #8
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While the yeast in bread is a "living" thing - it is not a pathogen. Dishwashing soap and hot water are all it takes to kill it.

My board is wood ... I just allow any dough on it to air dry and then scrape it down with a "bench scraper" (you could use a metal spatula) ... then with a mostened green scrubbie if anything is stuck - and wipe it dry with a paper towel.
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Old 06-08-2008, 09:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
While the yeast in bread is a "living" thing - it is not a pathogen. Dishwashing soap and hot water are all it takes to kill it.

My board is wood ... I just allow any dough on it to air dry and then scrape it down with a "bench scraper" (you could use a metal spatula) ... then with a mostened green scrubbie if anything is stuck - and wipe it dry with a paper towel.
That's what I do no big deal it's just yeast and flour. Now chicken is another issue I don't worry to much about other meats.
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