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Old 12-01-2004, 10:34 PM   #11
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Im glad I could help! :roll:
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Old 12-02-2004, 07:16 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debthecook
Whats that about the alcohol???, I thought your questions were about yeast in breadmaking.
Yeast, all yeast, do indeed feed on sugar. (Some specialized strains can feed on more complex forms of sugar) There are other nutrient requirements as well, but unless you need a ton of sugar converted, it's not an issue.

As the yeasts eat the sugar, the do indeed give of CO2 and alcohol. If you bake it, the trace alcohol goes away. (Lifter's explanation was spot on, except that it's CO2 and not O2)

HOWEVER, add it to beer/wine, and you have the mechanism by which fermentation is achieved. Brewers (and to a lesser extent, vinters) have to take very good care of their yeasts, or any number of bad things will happen (including unsellable beer - bad for business).

As an aside, if you were to put a pound of sugar in a gallon of water, you'd get a alcoholic beverage of about 4-4.5 percent alcohol by volume. Actively fermenting yeast are also how beer and champagne first got their bubbles.

John

Sheesh! Do I sound like I need to get out of the lab more often, or what?
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Old 12-02-2004, 08:44 AM   #13
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I know that the trace elements of alcohol are burned off in baking. I was just concerned that his last sentence bringing up the alcohol may not be in the right place (I have a BA in English, I should get out of the english texts too) or appropriate for this paragraph.
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Old 12-02-2004, 09:18 AM   #14
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Ahhh....

Proper english and grammar - NOT my strongest point

John
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Old 12-02-2004, 09:24 AM   #15
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Neither is my science.
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Old 12-02-2004, 02:58 PM   #16
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THANKS GUYS!!!!! Well, I got full points on that problem you all helped me on, and I know more about fermentation now.

The entire fermentation process starts with glucose (sugar). The sugar goes through glycolysis, and is converted to pyruvate. With out the presence of oxygen, the pyruvate goes through fermentatioin, rather than oxidative respiration if the oxygen would have been present. Once fermentation is complete, the end products are carbon dioxide and ethyl alcohol. That's where the yeast comes in. The alcohol and CO2 help the dough rise.

I couldn't have done it without your help. Thanks again!


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Old 12-03-2004, 12:12 AM   #17
 
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(SIGH!)

Another C- in science, after I blew the call on Oxygen vs CO2...

It gets "scarey" that we are teaching CB about "fermentation" at this early point of her innocent life...

LOL!

Lifter
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