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Old 12-01-2004, 09:35 PM   #1
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I NEED HELP ON MY BIOLOGY 1 HOMEWORK!!!!!!!!

Ok, here's the deal. I am on my last questions in bio 1, and this one I thought you all could help me on. Here it is:

Bread rises as a result of yeast fermentation. How might fermentation cause bread to rise? Why is sugar often added to bread dough?

So, can you help me? I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

CookinBlondie*

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Old 12-01-2004, 09:46 PM   #2
 
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I'm not the best one to answer this CB, but yeast is in fact a living organism that needs moisture, heat and "food" to "prosper"...

In this case, you have provided the moisture and the temperature in your bread dough medium, so your addition of sugar allows for the little yeast varmints to eat.

As they eat and grow, they give off oxygen by serving them selves the "hydro carbons" pulled out of the water/sugar mix, which of course, causes the "bubbles" that are formed in the interior of the bread loaf...

As the loaf/dough is being "pumped full of air" by this action, it is caused to "rise" as the dough medium does not allow the oxygen gas to escape....

When you bake the dough, the heat causes the gasses to further expand (simple physics, that!) until the bread is fully formed and dried, being somewhat rigid (think "crust") and you, of course, remove it from the oven...

I'd wait for a couple other respondents to clock in on this one, to check out my exact chemistry...

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Old 12-01-2004, 09:46 PM   #3
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Okay, odviously this isn't getting anywhere. I just thought you all would know. I need to go to bed soon, so do you guys have ANY idea what this could be about? Do not worry about cheating. I never cheat, and I have been given permission by my bio teacher to use any resource i can find to help me. Please, any idea will be of value to me. Thanks.

CookinBlondie*

EDIT: SORRY, THERE WERE NO OTHER POSTS WHEN I STARTED THIS ONE.:oops: THANKS LIFTER, YOU LIFTED MY HOMEWORK SPIRITS. :roll:
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Old 12-01-2004, 09:57 PM   #4
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This may sound crude but to quote a buddy of mine who was a wine steward, "Yeast feeds on sugar, farts CO2 and pisses alcohol."
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Old 12-01-2004, 09:58 PM   #5
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Maybe Fleischmann's can help
http://www.breadworld.com/sciencehistory/science.asp
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Old 12-01-2004, 09:59 PM   #6
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Re: I NEED HELP ON MY BIOLOGY 1 HOMEWORK!!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CookinBlondie
Ok, here's the deal. I am on my last questions in bio 1, and this one I thought you all could help me on. Here it is:

Bread rises as a result of yeast fermentation. How might fermentation cause bread to rise? Why is sugar often added to bread dough?

So, can you help me? I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

CookinBlondie*
A byproduct of fermentation is CO2 (carbon dioxide), a clear and odorless gas. The gas is trapped by the elastic, almost rubbery, dough causing the dough to rise. Baking the dough causes the CO2 to heat up and expand further, causing the dough to rise even more.

Sugar is added to provide food for the yeast, but in most cases, sugar is added for the sweet flavor. The sugar is not really required for the yeast to grow. Millions of loaves of bread are baked every day that only has flour, yeast, and water in the dough.
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Old 12-01-2004, 10:05 PM   #7
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Re: I NEED HELP ON MY BIOLOGY 1 HOMEWORK!!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psiguyy
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookinBlondie
Ok, here's the deal. I am on my last questions in bio 1, and this one I thought you all could help me on. Here it is:

Bread rises as a result of yeast fermentation. How might fermentation cause bread to rise? Why is sugar often added to bread dough?

So, can you help me? I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

CookinBlondie*
A byproduct of fermentation is CO2 (carbon dioxide), a clear and odorless gas. The gas is trapped by the elastic, almost rubbery, dough causing the dough to rise. Baking the dough causes the CO2 to heat up and expand further, causing the dough to rise even more.

Sugar is added to provide food for the yeast, but in most cases, sugar is added for the sweet flavor. The sugar is not really required for the yeast to grow. Millions of loaves of bread are baked every day that only has flour, yeast, and water in the dough.
Thanks all of you! Free hugs now available! So, when you do add sugar, what exactly happens? What exactly do you mean by "helps the yeast"?

CookinBlondie*
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Old 12-01-2004, 10:16 PM   #8
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From the Food Network:

All baker's yeast should be given a test called proofing to make sure it's still alive. To proof yeast, dissolve it in warm water and add a pinch of sugar. Set the mixture aside in a warm place for 5 to 10 minutes. If it begins to swell and foam, the yeast is alive, active and capable of leavening bread.
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Old 12-01-2004, 10:19 PM   #9
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Okay guys, here's my answer:

A byproduct of fermentation is CO2. This gas is trapped by the dough, causing it to rise. Baking the dough causes the carbon dioxide to heat up and expand further, causing even more rising. Yeast, being a living organism, feeds off of the sugar, and is able to produce more CO2, and alcohol.

Is it good? Hope so. Well thanks for your help! I will tell you how I did after I get it graded tommarow. Thanks again! You guys are the best!


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Old 12-01-2004, 10:29 PM   #10
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Whats that about the alcohol???, I thought your questions were about yeast in breadmaking.
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