"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-24-2007, 09:28 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 34
Improvising bread flour from semolina and all-purpose

Can I mix semolina and all-purpose flour and get something that behaves like bread flour? What fraction should I mix them in? I have a scale. I am in Canada, apparently protein content varies depending on where it came from.

__________________

__________________
ntbsnthlrchn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 05:15 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Unless your bag of AP flour tells you the protein content (%) - there is no simple answer. AP flour is a blend of hard and soft wheat flours ... it can vary greatly by region and by brand.

Canadian unbleached AP flour is generally within the range of bread flour - and wouldn't need any semolina to strengthen it (increase the protein %). Bleached AP is a little lower (usually 1%) in protein - but still may be strong enough for bread making without the addition of semolina.

If you want to experiment with AP and Semolina bread - you can try replacing between about 1/4 to 1/2 of the flour with semolina by VOLUME.

Sorry I can't give you a better answer but there are a LOT of unknown variables here.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 07:14 PM   #3
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntbsnthlrchn
Can I mix semolina and all-purpose flour and get something that behaves like bread flour? ... I am in Canada, apparently protein content varies depending on where it came from.
Canadian flour is prized worldwide for making excellent bread, so it is difficult to know why you feel you need to add semolina flour to your available flour(s) to make bread. If you are experiencing problems with your bread rising, I wonder if it is due to the flour you're using or other factors.

It is true that all purpose flour, as sold in the US, is a blend of soft wheat (best used for cakes, pastry, biscuits, etc.) and hard wheat (best used for bread). However, I find that many brands of US all-purpose flour are great for making bread. I seldom use bread flour unless my bread also includes a large amount of low-gluten grain flours (such as rye, barley, oatmeal, etc) or legume flours (soy flour, etc).

Semolina flour actually comes from a different species of wheat - durum wheat (triticum durum) - which is primarily used for pasta. The species of wheat used for bread is bread/common wheat (triticum aestivum).

In general, you should treat Semolina flour as an additive to your bread and should not look to it to make a stronger flour that will somehow make your bread rise better. Also, you will need to know how finely milled the semolina flour is - the semolina flour I can buy in the US is slightly gritty to the touch, and this kind of flour will not absorb water as readily as ordinary bread flour and certainly will not help make a strong flour (see this DC thread on semolina flour)

US companies that sell flour generally indicate on the package whether their product is suitable for bread. In the US, there are companies that sell flour specifically labeled as bread flour. Bread flour is always a good bet for most breads.

In my experience, some US All-purpose flours also make excellent bread. For example, either Heckers Unbleached All-purpose flour and Gold Medal Unbleached All-purpose flour make an excellent bread (both are labeled suitable for bread machines) on the side or the back.

I am sorry that I can't help you with Canadian brands of flour, but I hope some of this will help.

If you'd like to know more about "soft" vs "hard" wheat and "spring" vs "winter" wheat and how they're used in flours and what it means for your baking, whether bread, pastry or cookies, just ask.
__________________
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 08:18 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Actually, sub - Canadian AP flour is also a blend of soft (low protein, low gluten) flour and hard (high protein, high gluten) flour. It's not a matter of if it is blended - it's a matter of how it is blended - and that, like in the US, is a matter of brand and region. It is, however, blended with more high gluten flour than some US brands (east of the Mississippi) and Southern brand blends. It is more akin to King Arthur brand AP, or North-eastern Brand blends.

This kind of goes back to what I said before - Canadian AP flour is generally strong enough to make bread without the addition of semolina flour.

Oh - the soy and fava bean flours added to wheat flours ... while they add a distinctive "beany" flavor they are also "flour improvers" - they help oxadize the wheat flour in the absence of "bleaching" ... not legal in some EU countries. This breaks off the sulphur rings on the ends of the gluten proteins and allows them to form longer and stronger chains. But, I think this far exceeds what ntbsnthlrchn was asking about.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.