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Old 12-27-2006, 02:22 PM   #21
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There is a long thread in this forum with contributions from many DC members that discusses making baguettes and other artisan breads. Contains recipes and pointers. click here for the link
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Old 12-27-2006, 09:07 PM   #22
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You would think that if someone was really interested in making artisan breads they would read what has already been posted in here, huh subfuscpersona?

I'm not going to reinvent the wheel ... we've discussed this a lot before ...

If you just want "makeshift" recipes - try here.

If you want to learn about making bread - try here.

One secret that I have discovered about the bread in France vs the USA is that in France the bread flour also contains some bean flour ...
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Old 12-28-2006, 11:27 AM   #23
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Thanks JDP and Walt

That sponge method is definately worth a try. If i keep improving, the bread i make, with these methods, eventually i hopefully will have fantastic bread. Although, it is already getting pretty good, if i say so myself.

Mel
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Old 12-28-2006, 11:29 AM   #24
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Thanks Aria

I tried the steam, with the last bread i baked. The bread turned out great. Much improved, from previous efforts.

Mel
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Old 12-28-2006, 11:33 AM   #25
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Walt

Is it OK, to do the flourless sponge, with fresh yeast?

Mel
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Old 12-28-2006, 11:37 AM   #26
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Thanks for those links, Subfuscpersona and Michael.

Isnt homemade bread fantastic. Up until last Summer, i was too cowardly, to try to make it. I used to think it was so complicated. When one starts to get good, at it, it becomes fun.

Mel
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Old 12-28-2006, 12:12 PM   #27
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If you want to really explore artisanal bread and the processes of breadmaking, I recommend Peter Reinhart's book The Bread Baker's Apprentice.
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Old 12-28-2006, 11:42 PM   #28
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I just happened to have watched Alton Brown on the food channel discuss bread baking yeaterday, and he recommened baking the bread on top of a large unglazed ceramic pot saucer, assuming you can find one large enough. Also using steam in the oven while baking. He also let the bread rise in a steam filled, but not hot oven. I havnt tried the saucer yet, but the steam works great.
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Old 12-29-2006, 06:14 AM   #29
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For a baking stone or the "ceramic saucer" you are referring to you can go to Home Depot and get unglazed quarry tiles. I keep a set in the bottom of my oven to bake pizzas on.
You might also be interested in the lengthy thread on the NYTimes bread recipe for a different and fun way to make bread.
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Old 12-29-2006, 06:57 AM   #30
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Sure, you can do this at home. It's a two day process, however. You make a puglish or biga the first day, (it's like a yeasty sponge) and after that rises, you make the dough. Incorporate that into biga into the dough being careful not to pop the bubbles. Let it rise overnight in a cool place. Next day, shape the dough and let it rise again in a warm place.

You need a bit of steam in the oven. When you are ready to place the loaves in the oven you should squirt water onto the walls. Then, every few minutes during baking open the door slightly and squirt the walls again.

I've had magnificent results. You just have to be willing to put the time into this. I use a cookbook called the Breadbakers Apprentice.
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