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Old 09-30-2006, 10:41 PM   #1
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Location: New Zealand
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ISO Fruit and Nut bread recipe

Howdy all. I am on the hunt for a fabulous fruit and nut bread recipe. I do not mind if it is a breadmaker recipe or not, I woud just prefer a yeast based recipe that is rich with fruit and nuts and spiced. All suggestions welcome.

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Old 10-01-2006, 12:15 AM   #2
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I don't have a breadmaker, and most of the fruit-and-nut bread recipes I know are "quick breads" (non-yeast), but here the only yeast recipe I have that might fit your wishes. It uses the old, non-metric (U.S.) measurements, sorry!

Bake-Ahead Breakfast Bread

Makes 2 loaves.

Ingredients:

1 package active dry yeast
pinch of sugar
1/2 cup very warm water (110 degrees fahrenheit)

1 1/2 cups lukewarm water (85 degrees fahrenheit)
1/4 cup sugar
3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (white flour)
2 cups whole-wheat flour (brown flour)
1 tablespoon salt
3 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
1/2 cup very soft butter

1 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
1 cup large raisins, seeds removed
1 cup dried apricots, coarsely chopped

floured bread board

a little cooking oil, to grease a bowl and baking sheet
a little flour, for the baking sheet

Preparation:

Sprinkle the yeast and pinch of sugar over the very warm water in a large bowl. Set aside for "proofing." (about 15 minutes)

Measure the dry ingredients (2 flours, salt, ginger and nutmeg) and sift them together.

When the yeast mixture is frothy, add the lukewarm water, sugar, very soft butter and mix gently. Then add the dry ingredients, bit by bit, stirring as you go, and then kneading.

Turn the dough out on the floured bread board and knead until smooth and elastic (10-15 minutes). Put the dough in an oiled bowl, and turn until the top is greased. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk (2-4 hours).

"Punch down" the dough. (Work gently to press out bubbles, deflate it, and even the texture.)

Turn the dough out on a floured surface and work in the nuts and fruits until they are evenly spread through the dough.

Prepare a large baking sheet -- oiled and floured.

Divide the dough into 2 loaves, and put the loaves onto the baking sheet. Cover loosely with plastic wrap (or a damp cloth) and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk (about 1 hour).

Bake in a preheated oven at 400 degrees fahrenheit for about 45 minutes, or until they are dark brown and sound hollow when tapped. The loaves bake best when they are near the bottom of the oven, not at the top.

This is one of my inherited "California" recipes. I now substitute pecans for the walnuts. They're easier to find in Texas!
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Old 10-01-2006, 12:49 AM   #3
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Hi TexanFrench.

Thank you so much for the recipe. It sounds like exactly what I am looking for! US measurements are completely okay with me. Many of the recipes I follow have come from the US - so I am usually pretty good with conversions! Just 2 questions - a packet of active yeast - do you have any idea of what this would weigh and are you okay with me 'blogging' the results and recipe at some time? Thanks again.
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Old 10-01-2006, 01:47 AM   #4
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Location: Central Texas college town
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"1 envelope or packet of Active Dry Yeast, Instant Yeast, Rapid Rise Yeast, Fast Rising Yeast or Bread Machine Yeast = 1/4 ounce, or 7 grams, which equals 2 1/4 teaspoons (11 mL)"

This is Fleischmann's Yeast, found in every corner of the U.S. I believe the company was recently acquired by a company in London, so you may see this in your shops someday!

I've posted a private message to you about the blog.
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Old 10-01-2006, 02:01 AM   #5
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Location: New Zealand
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Thanks for that - I checked against some other recipes I had and came up with 2 1/4 teaspoons. The dough is currently resting. Smells divine. I subsitiuted oil for butter and added a tablespoon of milk powder (keeps bread soft) and used a dark brown sugar. Will keep you posted on the result. I cannot wait for breakfast!
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