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Old 04-21-2008, 05:40 PM   #1
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ISO help to make cheap, very nutritious, egg sopping bread

what sort of pan do you use to make a real loaf of bread?

i'm wanting to make a cheap, high protein, vitamin and nutrient potent bread that tastes good and is basically perfect for sopping up egg juice.


what do you recomend?

and as for the rising, i normally use olive oil. if i have to use lard, is there anyway to get the real deal?

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Old 04-21-2008, 05:52 PM   #2
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A loaf pan...
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Old 04-21-2008, 05:58 PM   #3
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Merton, as Andy said, just use a loaf pan. I'm not clear what you mean "for the rising" you use olive oil.

I use olive oil for my pizza dough, etc. but haven't used it in my loaf bread. Also haven't used lard for it. I normally use plain vegetable shortening to make plain, loaf bread for toasting and "egg sopping."
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Old 04-21-2008, 07:05 PM   #4
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You can either use a loaf pan, or shape the loaf yourself into a round or elongated loaf, or use your imagination and make rolls instead. I always use butter in my basic bread, never olive oil except, as Katie said, in pizza dough. Try this link for lots of ideas on making nutritious bread Welcome to the Fresh Loaf | The Fresh Loaf
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Old 04-21-2008, 07:16 PM   #5
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I use the pan that came with my breadmachine
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Old 04-21-2008, 07:28 PM   #6
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I use a loaf pan, the same one that I use to make meat loaf when I want bread for sopping up egg juice, or sandwich bread. I free form my Rye bread and lots of others.

Rising in bread is most often accomplished with Yeast. Maybe this would be a good place to start. King Arthur Flour: Recipes The King Arthur site will have a lot of recipies and products to look over.

Maybe you would like something like this. Seven Grain Bread II - Allrecipes

ther is always white bread and whole wheat bread.

Welcome to bread baking it is fun and tasty.

Check out post #26 in this thread http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...h-45046-4.html in RE: protien.

HTH - AC
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Old 04-22-2008, 11:28 PM   #7
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where do you get this 7 grain cereal?
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Old 04-23-2008, 05:33 AM   #8
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I was thinking that one of the granolas would do.

I probably should have done a little more research. For my mulitgrain bread, I keep 10 grain flour on hand and substitute it for whole wheat flour in a whole wheat recipie. You can always add some interesting whole grains for texture and interest. Whole grains are available on the King Arthur website and other places. I would suggest looking at Bob's Brd Mill anb Barre Farm (sp).

I may have spelled that last name wrong, but, Google fixes things like that. :)
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Old 04-23-2008, 06:47 AM   #9
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Usually in the natural foods aisle in the grocery store you can get all kinds of small packages of different flours to mix in.... my store carries Bob's Red Mill flours. I also put ground flaxseed in mine.
MMm I think I outta bake some bread now!
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Old 04-26-2008, 12:34 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MERTON View Post
what sort of pan do you use to make a real loaf of bread?
There are all kinds of real loaves of bread - some use pans, some don't. If you are talking about the stuff you get from the grocery store where the slices are perfectly square - those are called a pullman loaf - and you need a pullman loaf pan with a lid - the bottom, sides and ends are at 90-angles and it has a lid which forms the top. They are also generally larger (longer) than the standard loaf pan (about 2-lb instead of the standard 1-lb open pan).

Quote:
Originally Posted by MERTON View Post
i'm wanting to make a cheap, high protein, vitamin and nutrient potent bread that tastes good and is basically perfect for sopping up egg juice.
Any bread, except for something so stale you could use it for a nail driving hammer, is great for sopping up "egg juices".

Now, - cheap and added nutritiousness is a contradiction in terms, or an oxymoron. The more nutritious - the more expensive. There are nutritious bread recipes - there are cheap ... and there are some that fall somewhere in-between. Probably the most famous "improver" is the Cornell Triple-rich formula ... added dry milk powder and wheat germ.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MERTON View Post
and as for the rising, i normally use olive oil. if i have to use lard, is there anyway to get the real deal?
I assume you are talking about oiling the bowl you proof your dough in? There is no reason not to use olive oil. As others have noted - fat (oil or lard) has nothing to do with "rising" - leavening is accomplished either by yeast or chemicals (baking powder and/or soda).
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