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Old 01-18-2011, 04:40 PM   #11
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I used to work at Nappi's Bakery in Portland Maine.
The quintessential Italian Sandwich Bread bakery in the southern Maine area.

The trick to the crust is to spray it with water before the proofing and after the proofing. The water for moistening and the water used in the dough was very well filtered also.
(note: after the proofing the dough ropes should be touching each other to the point of rising upward (not outward.)

A full size bakers sheet should hold 15 ropes (I think. It has been 20+ years) They were bagged in 6's and the division per pan was not even.

As to the recipe, it was a family secret.

There is no other bread like that in the world.
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Old 01-18-2011, 04:43 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhardt View Post
I used to work at Nappi's Bakery in Portland Maine.
The quintessential Italian Sandwich Bread bakery in the southern Maine area.

The trick to the crust is to spray it with water before the proofing and after the proofing. The water for moistening and the water used in the dough was very well filtered also.
(note: after the proofing the dough ropes should be touching each other to the point of rising upward (not outward.)

A full size bakers sheet should hold 15 ropes (I think. It has been 20+ years) They were bagged in 6's and the division per pan was not even.

As to the recipe, it was a family secret.

There is no other bread like that in the world.

Thanks for sharing and welcome to DC!
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Old 06-23-2012, 11:44 PM   #13
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Hi! I signed up specifically for this thread but I now realize there are many other interesting things to explore here. I realize this is an old thread but I'd like to bring it back to life. I too once lived in Maine and I CRAVE Maine Italian sandwiches and am trying to figure out what the Maine Italian Sandwich Bread Recipe might be? . I'm trying to see if I can make them at home and wonder if anyone has anymore tips or tricks to offer? I've tried hamburger and hot dog roll recipes and they aren't the same. Thanks!
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Old 06-24-2012, 12:15 AM   #14
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Welcome to DC, Kate!

I found a thread here that discusses your rolls. I keep trying to get my favorite bread maker to try different things. Hopefully, you will find the rolls you seek.
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Old 06-24-2012, 07:51 AM   #15
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Buon Giorno,

Interesting Post ...

*** Involtini ( Rolls ) in Roma ...

When we were in Roma, we had enjoyed Turkey Involtini stuffed with fresh home made Ricotta with black truffles at Casa Bleve on Va Del Teatro Valle Number 49 ...

In Italia, I have never seen Involtini in bread ... They are a roll served without bread.

Therefore, I would tend to believe that this Recipe from Maine had been developed by Italian Immigrants either during the 1920s or WWII 40s or prior to 1920s ...

Any historical knowledge on topic ?

Good luck with finding the right recipe for you.

Have a nice Sunday.
Ciao, Margi. Cintrano.
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:16 AM   #16
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I prefer Italian breads and rolls that look like this-
(Of course the small rolls are often round and of a much lighter color.)
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:22 AM   #17
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Bill,

Me too !

Crisy exteriors ... And the seeds ...

Ciao,
Margi.
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:30 AM   #18
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Hi! THANKS!

Hi Kathleen!
WOW! Thanks! I don't know how I've missed that one! I'll disect that thread, try the tips sometime over the next few days and report back!

Hi Margi!
I think we've met on Foods of the World forum!
History:
You're correct!
1902 Giovanni Amato began making this bread and selling it to shipworkers. He brought the recipe from Italy.

It has a different texture than the breads we in the US consider to be "Italian" in that it has a fine crumb and isn't crusty.

When considering the origin of this bread and the fact that one small bakery in Maine produces 10,000 Italian sandwich rolls per day, it has to be a fairly simple secret and I have to remember to not over think this! I think there are 3 bakeries in Maine producing these rolls. Amatos, Bottos and Nappis.

Let the experimentation begin!

Thanks again to you both! kate
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:46 AM   #19
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In my travels from Milano and Vicenza to Roma the Subway / Blimpie (swollen frankfurter roll / hamburger bun / Wonderbread consistency) breads did not seem to be particularly popular; except perhaps with people who have dental problems. Many of the northern Italian breads seemed to be a little short in the salt department. Throughout much of Europe breads of a more substantial nature seemed to be favored more than many of the breads favored in the USA.
I had to learn how to bake my own bread bread my when I moved out of the NYC area.
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Old 06-24-2012, 10:03 AM   #20
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I'm a bread fiend.......and also a bread snob! lol! I've been baking so long the Home Ec. teacher in high school had me, as a 7th grader, come in to teach the seniors how to make bread! lol! I completely understand your need to learn to make bread!
Those are beautiful loaves justplainbill.
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