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Old 09-22-2007, 11:36 AM   #1
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Thumbs up Katie's Walnut Potica recipe TNT

It took me quite a while to put this into recipe form because all I ever work from is a piece of paper with the list of the ingredients on it

Originally, when I watched my grandmother make potica, she rolled the dough into one huge rectangle that covered her dining room table. Actually, she only rolled the dough until it was quite large, and then she stretched it with the tops of her hands and knuckles until it was so thin the pattern of the cloth could be seen through it.

She rolled the potica into a long roll and put it into a pan, snaking it back and forth until it was all put in. It was a big job and quite a sight to see her get it into the pan.

Many years ago I decided to make it more manageable by dividing it into three portions. The most challenging part of making potica is to get the dough so very thin.

The many thin layers that are formed when it's rolled are what make potica so delicious.

So, Beloved, here's my family's potica recipe. If you have any questions or need help when you are ready to make it, please feel free to contact me via PM or email. I'll be more than happy to help you. Enjoy!


KATIE’S WALNUT POTICA
(Makes 3 large loaves)
Dough:
1 cup evaporated milk, lukewarm
1 pkg. active dry yeast or 2¼ tsp bulk active dry yeast or 1 cake yeast
¼ cup vegetable shortening, not butter-flavored
½ cup granulated sugar
4 large eggs
5 to 6 cups bread flour

Filling:
1 lb walnuts, finely ground
1 cup honey
1 cup whole milk
1 stick butter, no substitutes
Pinch of salt
1 tsp. vanilla

Topping:
1 large lemon
Ground cinnamon

In a large bowl, combine the warm milk and the yeast. Whisk until yeast is dissolved. Beat in the shortening and sugar. Add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until well mixed. With a wooden spoon mix in flour, 1 cup at a time, until a soft dough forms. Cover tightly and refrigerate 5 or 6 hours or overnight. Remove from the refrigerator about an hour before rolling.

To prepare filling, in a medium saucepan combine walnuts, honey, milk, butter, and salt. Stir over medium-low heat until butter melts. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Cool completely before spreading on dough.

When you are ready to form the potica loaves, you will need a large cloth-covered surface to roll the dough. I use my dining room table.

Divide dough into three equal portions. When rolling a portion, cover the remaining ones to prevent them from drying out.

Lightly flour the cloth, roll dough into a rectangle. Continue rolling until the dough is very, very thin. Almost thin enough to read through.

Spread one third of the filling over the dough, completely covering to the edges. Sprinkle evenly and lightly with cinnamon and finely grate lemon rind over all.

Starting at shortest side, roll as tightly as possible jellyroll-style. Place rolled loaf onto a large baking sheet, tucking under ends. Repeat with the remaining dough portions and place them on the baking sheet with the first loaf.

Cover with a cloth and put in a warm place to rise; about 1 hour. The loaves will touch and fill the baking sheet when they are fully risen.

Bake in a preheated 350º oven for about 60 to 75 minutes. Check at 50 minutes to see how brown the loaves are. It is normal for them to get quite dark, but not burned.

When done, remove loaves to a rack and brush with melted butter. Cool completely before slicing. Slice about ½-inch thick and serve spread with soft butter. Note: Potica freezes very well. Wrap in several layers of plastic wrap and place in heavy-duty zipper-lock freezer bags. Thaw in the refrigerator.

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Old 09-22-2007, 01:29 PM   #2
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Thumbs up The potica recipe - Thank you Katie

[quote=Katie E;485792]It took me quite a while to put this into recipe form because all I ever work from is a piece of paper with the list of the ingredients on it

Originally, when I watched my grandmother make potica, she rolled the dough into one huge rectangle that covered her dining room table. Actually, she only rolled the dough until it was quite large, and then she stretched it with the tops of her hands and knuckles until it was so thin the pattern of the cloth could be seen through it.[quote]

Ok, I have it saved and printed. Thank you for putting together for us. So, I have made what I thought was a nut roll but with dough only rolled modestly. It was good but I'll bet not like this with the thin pastry. This will take practice but I promise a picture when I'm close as a novice cook can get. Thanks again Katie.
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Old 09-22-2007, 01:38 PM   #3
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Yes, Dave, it does take a bit of practice to get the dough right and there will always be little holes and tears in it. That's okay. They'll be concealed when the potica is rolled up.

I've been making potica for over 30 years and before that my mother, grandmother and great-grandmother made it. I don't know how many generations this recipe goes back, but it's special to me.
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Old 09-22-2007, 02:04 PM   #4
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Living History!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
Yes, Dave, it does take a bit of practice to get the dough right and there will always be little holes and tears in it. That's okay. They'll be concealed when the potica is rolled up.

I've been making potica for over 30 years and before that my mother, grandmother and great-grandmother made it. I don't know how many generations this recipe goes back, but it's special to me.
Yes, this is living history at its best. Thanks D
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:25 PM   #5
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I know this is an OLD thread - but glad I found it. Trying my first potica today from a recipe that I had for a long time.

The filling ingredients created a 'soup' of a mix. After checking numerous sites and this one it appears some bakers 'cook' the filling a bit. I tested the theory but putting a small amount in the microwave and cooking it for 30 seconds. Woohooo it tightened right up. Put the rest in a pot for a few minutes and cooked. It's cooling now.

Next comes rolling the dough. ;)
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Old 12-18-2011, 02:13 PM   #6
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Ouch! I confess, I confess. I now buy mine from Vermont Country Store. I have made it before. My lord, what a project. A clean, bleached sheet to cover the dining room table. Buttery fingers to get that dough just right and thin. My husband and I toiled for hours over it, and when we were through it was good (tasting, that is) but lumpy and bumpy. For years I wanted to try it again, but we never got up the courage. And it would never be close to what my mother-in-law made. So I just buy it.
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Old 12-18-2011, 03:42 PM   #7
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Yes, Claire, it can be quite a project. I long ago quit making it in one big piece, covering the dining room table. Now, I divide the dough into equal portions and roll and stretch it in more manageable sizes to achieve the same end. Actually, I like it better this way because I can freeze some for later yumminess.
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Old 12-18-2011, 05:42 PM   #8
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Thank you, Katie! I almost didn't look at this thread because I didn't recognize the "potica." My SIL, with a Slavic background, makes this, which we just called nut roll. I bought some at a nearby church last year at their bake sale, but it just wasn't what I remembered. I also recall Graham Kerr, the Galloping Gourmet, making it once, stretching the dough out to cover a card table top. I'd love to make it, but am rather intimidated by the process. Maybe, thanks to your splitting it up, I'd be able to undertake it.

Do you also make an apple strudel using the hyper-thin dough, roll-it-up process? I bought an apple strudel at Octoberfest time from a small local German bake shop, and it was good, but not the tender, flaky strudel that I remember my SIL making.
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Old 12-18-2011, 07:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
Do you also make an apple strudel using the hyper-thin dough, roll-it-up process? I bought an apple strudel at Octoberfest time from a small local German bake shop, and it was good, but not the tender, flaky strudel that I remember my SIL making.
Yes, in a way. We have a recipe for something called apple potica, which is probably a strudel-like food. I haven't made it in a number of years so I can't advise right now about how it's prepared. I'll have to look it up, but that won't happen until after Christmas.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:10 PM   #10
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Success!!!!

The Potica is done and it tastes WONDERFUL.

It doesn't pretty but for a first try I'm VERY Happy. even hubby says I get an 'A'.

Kitchen is clean and I'm waiting for them to be cold before I wrap them up. I can't wait to make them again...you know that practice makes perfect better.
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