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Old 09-16-2006, 02:15 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I make breads in my mixer bowl. I add the yeast and sugar and then pour in the water and give it a quick stir.

Don't skimp on the salt, it makes a huge difference in the flavor.
When you say don't skimp on the salt do you mean to say that the amount of salt I use is too little?
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:24 PM   #12
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Are you proofing the yeast? Mixing it with warm water and sugar and getting it nice and foamy before you add anything to it? Yeast is a living organism, and with time, it gets less effective. If you aren't getting the foam, you won't get the rising action.
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:28 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by TexanFrench
Are you proofing the yeast? Mixing it with warm water and sugar and getting it nice and foamy before you add anything to it? Yeast is a living organism, and with time, it gets less effective. If you aren't getting the foam, you won't get the rising action.
It rises when I leave the dough in a warm spot but not in the oven. I mix the yeast with warm water but not with sugar yet. I'm planning to add sugar next time. I'm also going to mix the yeast more thoroughly when I add it.
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:43 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfwu
When you say don't skimp on the salt do you mean to say that the amount of salt I use is too little?
I believe you said you use less than the recipe calls for. I'm suggesting you try it with the recipe amount to see if the difference in taste is important to you.
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:48 PM   #15
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Mixing the yeast thoroughly is important, to get all of it working. Try using a whisk when you stir it into the warm water and sugar mixture.
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:51 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I believe you said you use less than the recipe calls for. I'm suggesting you try it with the recipe amount to see if the difference in taste is important to you.
I agree with Andy--try the recipe first. When you've got that down, play around!
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:53 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfwu
I know that there was another thread going on several months back, but I would rather not revive an old thread.

Anyway, my story is that I bake bread as a hobby. It's a casual thing so I am severely limited in equipment. I do have the basics, just nothing fancy like bakings stones or material for creating steam.

Lets see now, I'm currently experimenting on making a great oven spring for white bread. It is a pan loaf in a glass pan of which I am unsure of the dimensions. I use three and a half cups of flour and add random amounts of water based on the consistency of the dough. Then I do the usual thing, let it rise, release the gas, then let it rise some more in the pan. Then I bake it for about 35 minutes in a 425 degree oven.

My problem here is that I have very little to no oven spring. I've managed to have great oven spring about a year ago about two times where it almost doubled in size. My mom has tried it once and, without letting it rise in the pan, managed to make it enormous and very fluffy inside. This proves that it is possible to have great oven spring.

However, I have tried it several times since then and have failed every single time to get good oven spring (nearly twice the size). I have experimented like adding butter or keeping the crust moist or even making steam inside of the oven, which was an extremely difficult thing to do. Every single experiment failed. I have no idea what to do next. None of the books I find in the library or the bookstore give any tips at all regarding this and I believe this forum is my only hope.

Can anyone help me?
I begin by emphasizing that I'm no expert!
I've understood oven spring to describe the rise that occurs after the bread is put into the oven to bake. If that is how the term is being used here, it is unrealistic to expect the volume to double. At most, I might expect the distance from top of loaf pan to the highest point of the bread to double. In other words, after the final rise in the loaf pan on the counter, the top of the loaf might be 1/2 inch above the top of the pan when it goes into the oven and 1 inch above when it comes out.

As to temperature the rule of thumb is to reduce the temp 25 degrees in a glass pan. I bake white bread at 350F for 25 minutes. 425 for 35 minutes in glass loaf pan seems pretty hot to me.
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Old 09-16-2006, 03:06 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfwu
It rises when I leave the dough in a warm spot but not in the oven. I mix the yeast with warm water but not with sugar yet. I'm planning to add sugar next time. I'm also going to mix the yeast more thoroughly when I add it.
Whoa. You ARE letting it rise in the baking dish aren't you? You let it double in the pan, put it in the oven and bake it. Oven spring refers to the amount that RISEN dough increases in the oven.

Maybe you just left out the second rise in the above quote. But it certainly would explain it. Tone your oven down. That higher temp is for a different kind of bread--crusty atrisanal loaves often.

Salt in bread is good--better flavor. It may inhibit yeast when just in water but in bread dough, it is a valued ingredient. don't leave it out.
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Old 09-16-2006, 04:48 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Gretchen
Whoa. You ARE letting it rise in the baking dish aren't you? You let it double in the pan, put it in the oven and bake it. Oven spring refers to the amount that RISEN dough increases in the oven.

Maybe you just left out the second rise in the above quote. But it certainly would explain it. Tone your oven down. That higher temp is for a different kind of bread--crusty atrisanal loaves often.

Salt in bread is good--better flavor. It may inhibit yeast when just in water but in bread dough, it is a valued ingredient. don't leave it out.
Salt should be mixed in with the flour, not put into the yeasty proofing water.

Let us know how your next batch turns out!
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Old 09-16-2006, 05:56 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by TexanFrench
Salt should be mixed in with the flour, not put into the yeasty proofing water.

Let us know how your next batch turns out!
That's what I said, meant. Someone else was saying that salt slowed down the yeast and I assumed they meant in the proofing water.
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