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Old 01-20-2007, 03:38 PM   #191
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I'll start another batch. I really think the last time I used too much water (I say I, but my son measured it and I dumped it in and it's fault and I'm sticking to that! ) - it was icky sticky gloppy. Even after the first rise when I added more flour to "fold" it a couple times it was still sticky and gloppy. Seam? There was NO seam to be had at all! Hence I think it started with too much water.

So, I'll read your response before I begin.

The first bites when it was hot were fine. Once it cooled it was a bit stretchy/tough if that makes sense).
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Old 01-20-2007, 03:52 PM   #192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
I'll start another batch. I really think the last time I used too much water (I say I, but my son measured it and I dumped it in and it's fault and I'm sticking to that! ) - it was icky sticky gloppy. Even after the first rise when I added more flour to "fold" it a couple times it was still sticky and gloppy. Seam? There was NO seam to be had at all! Hence I think it started with too much water.


The first bites when it was hot were fine. Once it cooled it was a bit stretchy/tough if that makes sense).
ADD even MORE flour. It doesn't have to be gloppy. It shouldn't be gloppy.
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Old 01-20-2007, 03:58 PM   #193
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You must remember - I don't bake for a reason.

When it is FIRST made should it pull away from the sides after mixed?

Edited to say I think I know the answer to that - NO - that almost makes sense to even me.
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Old 01-20-2007, 04:04 PM   #194
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Buck and I just finished viewing our videotape of Martha Stewart's Thursday program where she and Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery made "the" bread.

It was interesting and a good tutorial. I'd been pondering what to use to bake the bread, but now am sure my nice, deep cast-iron skillet with foil on top will work just fine.

Hip, hip, hooray. We're going to enjoy some yummy new bread soon!
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Old 01-20-2007, 05:17 PM   #195
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kitchenelf, use 3 cups of flour. Measure flour: place your measuring cup into the flour and go across the measuring cup with a knife. Your cup is full.

2. place the correctly measured flour in a large bowl

3. add the salt and the yeast (1/4 teaspoon yeast 1-1/4 teaspoons salt)
with your hands or a wooden spoon STIR
4. Measure 1-1/2 cups water (warm)....NOT TOO HOT(make a well in the dry
ingredients) and pour all the warm water..into the dry ingredients.
5. Use the wooden spoon(I have a wooden spatula) and stir the complete
mixture. It should leave the sides of your bowl. NOT TO DRY...as you stir
it should start to form a ball. It is not necessary to KNEAD...but the
dough should be easy to handle (NOT STICK to bowl or hands). The Bowl
is practically CLEAN. No dough stuck to the bowl. .perhaps a tiny bit. This is important.

In this ALMOST clean bowl place the dough (it is a ball) in this bowl and cover TIGHTLY with plastic wrap. The wrap will seal. Cling to the bowl.

Place in a warm area. I place mine in my oven. Away from drafts etc. Let it stay in the oven for 12- 18 hours.

Remove the dough from the bowl. It should be easy to handle. Place on a lightly floured surface and do the fold overs. You pat lightly with your hands and left and right sides and lower and upper sides. and place seam side down
on a lightly floured towel and let it rest (covered with floured other end of the same towel)....Covered let it rest for 2 hours.

1/2 Hour before ready to bake place your baking pot with cover on in 450 oven.

Carefully remove your pot to a surface (I use my stove burner) that will take HOT objects. Pick up the dough (the seam side is DOWN) when you pick up the dough....lift and place in the hot pot with the seam side UP. a slight turn . Cover and place the pot in the HOT oven. I cook for 30 minutes. I use the ceramic insert from my crock pot and the glass cover. My bread has a golden surface and hard crust and it is done. Remove the complete pot. Then the cover.
Then the Bread. Place the Bread on a rack to cool.


5.
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Old 01-20-2007, 05:30 PM   #196
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Thanks Candocook and Aria - I am assuming there was waaaaaaaay too much water when I first tried this. I will also maybe use a smaller pot. I will have to do this tomorrow as I am out of time tonight. I guess I can just use my 5-quart sauce pot with its cover.

If I decide to double this recipe and make one larger loaf should I just use a larger pan and increase the cooking time?

Aria - I appreciate the detailed explanation and will follow instructions. I will have my trusty camera out the whole time too!
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Old 01-20-2007, 05:46 PM   #197
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You're not going to be able to double it--or at least I couldn't--and I am baking mine in a clay cloche made for baking bread. You can increase it a small amount.
I have posted the same thing on other boards--don't make this hard--no foolin'.
I use a tupperware container for the first sponge.
I let the second rise happen in a saran wrapped bowl--it gets a bit higher, hence a larger loaf.

Rather than foil for the top, try a cookie sheet--quicker to get arranged in the oven.
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Old 01-20-2007, 05:54 PM   #198
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I've got a top for my sauce pan - I SWEAR I'm not trying to make this hard - it just comes naturally for me when it comes to baking. I will not double or even increase slightly - will do exactly. Thanks.
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Old 01-20-2007, 05:55 PM   #199
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Please do not change the recipe. The loaf is small. But once you master the process...you can make it often. DO NOT DOUBLE recipe.

1. measure correctly

2. follow the directions given in detail

3. find the correct pot. Ceramic with a glass cover ...or?

Looking forward to photos. After you have mastered the BREAD...then you can try different things. Make it easy...make it fun.
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Old 01-22-2007, 07:44 PM   #200
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Made "the" bread this weekend. Awesome! Buck and I are trying to think of new ways to eat it. Had some toasted for breakfast this morning. Yummy.

I used my deep cast-iron skillet as the bottom of the baking vessel and my cast-iron grill pan as the lid. Fit just right. Just great for the bread. I would've used one of my Le Creuset pieces, but they're all too big and Le Creuset doesn't recommend the lid knobs at 450 degrees. Of course, I could always remove the knob.

The dough rose perfectly during it's multi-hour stage and did well for the second rise. Beautiful dough. I could see it forming the bubbles, which would become the airy pockets in the finished product. That was like the carrot in front of the donkey.

While it was baking, I could've almost eaten the door off the oven the smell was so tantalizing. The finished bread was as lovely as any we've gotten from the bakery.

It's so easy, there's no doubt we'll make it again...soon.

Those of you DCers who haven't tried it, should get crackin'. You don't know what you're missing.
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