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Old 01-23-2007, 09:53 PM   #211
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The professor learned to things today: 1. from Katie E..Quote (always wondered) thanks.

2. from bethzaring: ahia is really Ohio

Thanks
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Old 01-26-2007, 05:42 AM   #212
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I am in the process of trying to make this bread. I have no confidence that it'll turn out. I made the dough yesterday and it sat in my kitchen for 20 hours. I ended up with very wet dough that is now (after much sticking) in some sort of shape sitting on a towel for a couple of hours, so it will double in bulk. I have my doubts.

I used fFeischmann's yeast and all purpose flour plus the salt and water in the amounts called for.

Any suggestions? Has anyone else experienced these problems? What a mess.
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Old 01-26-2007, 06:07 AM   #213
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continue on my friend. I hope you have plenty of flour on the towel. It will be difficult to tell if it doubles in bulk. Your ingredients sound good. Yes, it can seem like a mess. Next time, make sure there is plenty of flour on the table when you first turn out the dough for the turn and 15 minute rest and there is lotsa flour on the towel for the 2 to 3 hour final rest. Look at this thread from the beginning, someone posted their personal pictures and tips, they are excellent. I printed them out and use them for my guide lines.
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Old 01-26-2007, 06:32 AM   #214
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Thanks for the encouraging words. I really hope it turns out o.k. I read more of the previous posts, as you suggested, and I have some small hope that I maypull this off. I'll let you know.
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Old 01-26-2007, 06:49 AM   #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lyndalou
I am in the process of trying to make this bread. I have no confidence that it'll turn out. I made the dough yesterday and it sat in my kitchen for 20 hours. I ended up with very wet dough that is now (after much sticking) in some sort of shape sitting on a towel for a couple of hours, so it will double in bulk. I have my doubts.

I used fFeischmann's yeast and all purpose flour plus the salt and water in the amounts called for.

Any suggestions? Has anyone else experienced these problems? What a mess.
I HOPE YOU SEE THIS!!!

You need to add some more flour. Take it off the towel now and add some flour until it is "soft as a baby's bottom". It isn't meant to be wet on the towel.

For adding the flour at this stage, I flour the counter liberally (1/2C maybe a bit more?). Then I just turn the glob of dough over so both sides are floured--in the case of sticky globs, I have used a pastry scraper or spatula. I just keep gently turning it until it will form that baby's bottom thing. I usually have a good bit of flour left.

Also, I have begun to allow mine to rise in a bowl--others have used a colander. Put saran wrap in a bowl that is about twice the size of the dough. Put some cornmeal on it, put in the dough (that you have added more flour to at this point). Allow it to rise--I did some yesterday and could have baked after about 2 hours, but let it rise several more.
Then plonk into your baking setup.

On another board someone also said that the dough was wet--there is no reason to keep it that way--ADD FLOUR to make a dough that while not at all stiff, it isn't sticky in any way.

Again, don't make this recipe difficult. It may need tweaking from the recipe, and it isn't an exact cup for cup measurement (like a cake), but it is easy and delicious.
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Old 01-26-2007, 01:25 PM   #216
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Well, Candocook, I wish I had read your message a lot earlier. My dough was very wet and I had one hard time getting it to form anything. I ended up with a free form loaf of bread. The crust is quite chewy (had a hard time slicing it with my bread knife) and the inside is soft. Is this the way yours turns out?
I will make this again, but will follow your good advice and use more flour.


Thanks for the information.

Lyndalou
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Old 01-26-2007, 02:20 PM   #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lyndalou
Well, Candocook, I wish I had read your message a lot earlier. My dough was very wet and I had one hard time getting it to form anything. I ended up with a free form loaf of bread. The crust is quite chewy (had a hard time slicing it with my bread knife) and the inside is soft. Is this the way yours turns out?
I will make this again, but will follow your good advice and use more flour.


Thanks for the information.

Lyndalou
Surely do wish you had seen it. No, that is not how it should turn out. The crust is ultra crisp and thick and inside is nicely moist--like you would like bread to be.
Please try again--right now!!! It takes virtually no time and no materials. The step to watch is adding the flour.
Use 1 1/2C water, 3C flour. I use up to a half tsp of yeast. And the salt.
I promise--you can do it.
Slice this bread and use it for croutons.
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Old 01-26-2007, 02:41 PM   #218
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The dough is supposed to be heavy and wet. Here's the original article which refers to the wetness of the dough.

"He mixes a very wet dough, about 42 percent water, which is at the extreme high end of the range that professional bakers use to create crisp crust and large, well-structured crumb, both of which are evident in this loaf. "

"By starting this very wet dough in a hot, covered pot, Mr. Lahey lets the crust develop in a moist, enclosed environment. "

It really shouldn't need much more flour to get it to the proper consistency for the second rise. It is not supposed to be "like a baby's bottom," which is the descriptive standard for a kneaded bread. It's supposed to be a wet dough which has enough extra flour added to hold its shape.

I've made this bread at least 2 dozen times at this point and have had to add a significant amount of extra flour a few times to get the dough to hoild shape, so I did some subsequent research on it. IMO if you let the first rise go much beyond 16 hours you run the risk of having some of the water "weep" out of the dough. I don't have my Cookwise right here but it says that if the dough is left to rise for too long, some of the water can be forced out of it.

I have experienced that myself with the dough going from shaggy and heavy and bubbly, etc at 12-14 hours to somewhat separated at 20 hours. With a 24 hour rise there definitely was some water that had separated from the dough. Under these circumstances it was impossible to get the dough to keep it's shape without adding maybe 1/3 - 1/2 cup more flour.

So now I try to let the first rise go 16 hours and no more.

Also -- skip the towel and use a bowl like others have said.
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Old 01-26-2007, 04:16 PM   #219
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Thanks again for the advice. I am definitely going to try again, as soon as I can get some more flour. Tomorrow is soon enough.

Really good idea to use the one I have for croutons.

I'll also cut down on the rising time. It sort of got away from me, as I started it at 9am . Got up at 5am to finish it. I don't give up easily so you can count on hearing from me again.

Lyndalou
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Old 01-26-2007, 08:42 PM   #220
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lyndalou, You should follow the recipe. It says 12 to 18 hours. And please
see previous posts with detailed info. Many have tried and perfected it.
You can too. 3 cups flour 1/4 teaspoon yeast 1-1/4 teaspoon salt 1-1/2 cups warm water. I believe a photo of my loaf is on page 20. Good luck. Looking forward to your bread photo.
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