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Old 11-29-2007, 12:43 PM   #271
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I had forgotten all about it until my BIL requested that I make it for X-mas last week. I would love to hear about other variations as well.
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:54 PM   #272
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It's funny you should bring this up, beth. Beginning on page 18, the January & February 2008 issue of Cook's Illustrated, there is a wonderful discussion of no-knead bread. Great article and they offer variations, as well as enhancing the taste of the bread with the addition of lager. It's "must" try for me. I can't wait to see how it turns out and how it will taste.
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Old 11-29-2007, 02:33 PM   #273
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hey Katie, is it the NY Times recipe; 3 C. flour, 1/4 t. yeast and 1 1/4 t. salt? lager? for the whole liquid volume? What makes the article so great??

I have been using all whole wheat flour and keeping the dough in the bowl for the whole process. I just flop the dough around when it is time for the 15 minute fold and 2 hour rise.
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Old 11-29-2007, 02:55 PM   #274
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No, it's not the N.Y. Times recipe, but similar. The ingredients include 3 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. instant yeast, 1 1/2 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. water, 1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. mild lager, and 1 Tbsp. white vinegar.

They have also created a different way of transferring the dough to the hot pan and have developed recipes for "Olive, Rosemary and Parmesan Bread," "Whole Wheat Bread," and "Cranberry-Pecan Bread."

It's an interesting article and I'm not sure if it's available online, but it would be worth a look-see.
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Old 11-29-2007, 02:58 PM   #275
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I love that bread! Every time I make it people are so impressed..........I will look for the magazine sounds like some fun alternatives.
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Old 12-05-2007, 07:42 PM   #276
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
hey Katie, is it the NY Times recipe; 3 C. flour, 1/4 t. yeast and 1 1/4 t. salt? lager? for the whole liquid volume? What makes the article so great??
I have read the Cooks Ill. article and also find it great.

If you are not familiar with CI, they always spend at least a page or two explaining the process they went through to create a better recipe, and just why it works. Very much like "Good Eats" on the Food Network if you get that. In this case, the original recipe was considered flat tasting and had various shapes depending on how it was handled getting to the pan.

Their goal is to simplify that type of stuff. For example, they call for some kneading which takes 15-20 seconds, but results in the rise only needing to be only 8 hours. They use parchment to transfer to a preheated dutch oven, so the handling is minimized after the second rise and little if any deflation takes place.

I have never tried a recipe of theirs that turned out bad, and some have been fantastic.

Mozart
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Old 12-05-2007, 11:38 PM   #277
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I still make it all the time. I worked out my own variation on how to transfer it long ago -- do the second rise in a bowl and dump it in.
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Old 12-21-2007, 05:56 PM   #278
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update on the nyt artesan bread

I've been passing along this recipe for a year now, and guess what? Cooks Illustrated has improved on it now. It's in their latest issue. Essentially they hydrate the flour slightly less and add beer and vinegar to get that sourness character from a real artesan bakery. they add about a little kneading too to get the gluten strands lengthened because of the less amount of water.
So the procedure here is still the same but here are the changes ** indicates different amounts
3 c. flour
1/4 t. yeast
1 1/2 t. salt
7 ounces water ** (3/4 c + 2 T )
3 ounces mild lager (like Bud) 1/4 c +2 T)

Stir until a shaggy ball, let rise in sealed bowl for 8 -18 hours.

Then when you turn it out on the floured surface, knead it 10-to 15 times.
**Here's another trick they came up with. Form it into the loaf, (it will be a bit easier because it's not so moist)and place it in a parchment lined skillet. Isn't that a neat trick. Now when you transfer it into the Dutch oven, just lift the parchment, bread and all and place into it.
They reduced the heat to 425 when they put the bread in the oven and baked 30 min with the lid on and 20 to 30 min. with it off.
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Old 12-21-2007, 08:04 PM   #279
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I like the idea of vinegar, but I don't see amounts in your post. Do you recall how much they used? I am guessing a tablespoon or maybe two.
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Old 12-21-2007, 08:09 PM   #280
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the vinegar

oops, I see I didn't include that. sorry
1T. white vinegar
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