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Old 07-21-2008, 05:03 PM   #361
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I am not one for baking breads and biscuits. Have not had much luck with dough or anything it that realm. I have done biscuits a few times and still trying to figure out what I am doing wrong there.

After looking at this thread and seeing something similar done on Good Eats, this is definately something I want to try. Looks like it would taste awesome and I can only imagine that making sammies from it would be devine!

First ... I gotta wait till it cools off a bit around here!!! Tooo dang hot and the air condition runs non stop.
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Old 07-21-2008, 05:37 PM   #362
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Correction....I should list post #

I would like to make it simple for all to locate info:
1. my complete directions for New York Times Bread is post #195

2. a photo of my New York Times Bread is post #360

Aria
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Old 07-21-2008, 09:12 PM   #363
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Originally Posted by Sedagive View Post
I bake mine at 450 with excellent results. I've been using KA bread flour exclusively but today I bought a bag of Gold Medal Harvest King Better for Bread flour. I'm looking forward to seeing if there is any difference. The GM was half the price of the KA. I'll post tomorrow after the bread is done.

Sedagive.
Well, I just tasted the bread and there was no difference in taste or texture with the Gold Medal flour. It came out kind of flat but I think its because I used a little too much water. Still very delicious and it cost me half as much to make.
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Old 07-21-2008, 09:42 PM   #364
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Originally Posted by Sedagive View Post
Well, I just tasted the bread and there was no difference in taste or texture with the Gold Medal flour. It came out kind of flat but I think its because I used a little too much water. Still very delicious and it cost me half as much to make.
good for you, gold medal is what i use as well. i have even made it with store brand of flour. generally though it is no less expensive than g.m.

babe
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Old 07-21-2008, 09:52 PM   #365
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Originally Posted by Sedagive View Post
Well, I just tasted the bread and there was no difference in taste or texture with the Gold Medal flour. It came out kind of flat but I think its because I used a little too much water. Still very delicious and it cost me half as much to make.
I have been using $1.78/5# bag unbleached AP flour for my NYT from day #1. I made one loaf using Bob's Red Mill bread flour ($2.58/5# bag), and like you, noticed no difference in taste, texture, size, etc., so I see no reason to pay more if I'm not deriving some additional benefit for the money, regardless of how little the price difference is ($.16 difference per 1# of flour in this case, as I make my NYT bread using 1# of flour and 12.4 oz of warm water by weight).

Speaking of weight, I think a lot of problems could be resolved for bread bakers if they purchased an inexpensive digital scale, and started to convert their recipes to weight measurement rather than volume measurement. Using this method you are guaranteed repeatability which you will not get from volume measurements. I bought my scale at Target for $29.95, and it has proven to be my most valuable baking and cooking tool. I also use it as a postal scale, and for dividing meat and produce into evenly weighed portions for freezing. Its most frequent use, in the consistency category, is for making sandwich rolls and hot dog buns. 2.5 oz of dough makes a perfectly sized hamburger roll.

Many of us here use weight measurement for our baking, and would be happy to share our recipe conversions with you if you get a scale. My NYT recipe by weight is listed above, so you can get started immediately if you have a scale. The salt and yeast are easier done with measuring spoons rather than weight. Flour and liquids are the big culprits when it comes to inconsistency.

Lastly, when I get ready to bake, I cover my scale with a piece of clear plastic wrap to keep flour and/or liquids from getting inside and causing problems.

Sorry if I hijacked the post, but I thought this might help some folks.

JoeV
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Old 07-21-2008, 11:01 PM   #366
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeV View Post
I have been using $1.78/5# bag unbleached AP flour for my NYT from day #1. I made one loaf using Bob's Red Mill bread flour ($2.58/5# bag), and like you, noticed no difference in taste, texture, size, etc., so I see no reason to pay more if I'm not deriving some additional benefit for the money, regardless of how little the price difference is ($.16 difference per 1# of flour in this case, as I make my NYT bread using 1# of flour and 12.4 oz of warm water by weight).

Speaking of weight, I think a lot of problems could be resolved for bread bakers if they purchased an inexpensive digital scale, and started to convert their recipes to weight measurement rather than volume measurement. Using this method you are guaranteed repeatability which you will not get from volume measurements. I bought my scale at Target for $29.95, and it has proven to be my most valuable baking and cooking tool. I also use it as a postal scale, and for dividing meat and produce into evenly weighed portions for freezing. Its most frequent use, in the consistency category, is for making sandwich rolls and hot dog buns. 2.5 oz of dough makes a perfectly sized hamburger roll.

Many of us here use weight measurement for our baking, and would be happy to share our recipe conversions with you if you get a scale. My NYT recipe by weight is listed above, so you can get started immediately if you have a scale. The salt and yeast are easier done with measuring spoons rather than weight. Flour and liquids are the big culprits when it comes to inconsistency.

Lastly, when I get ready to bake, I cover my scale with a piece of clear plastic wrap to keep flour and/or liquids from getting inside and causing problems.

Sorry if I hijacked the post, but I thought this might help some folks.

JoeV
I have a scale... where is your recipe by weight?
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Old 07-21-2008, 11:03 PM   #367
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeV View Post
I have been using $1.78/5# bag unbleached AP flour for my NYT from day #1. I made one loaf using Bob's Red Mill bread flour ($2.58/5# bag), and like you, noticed no difference in taste, texture, size, etc., so I see no reason to pay more if I'm not deriving some additional benefit for the money, regardless of how little the price difference is ($.16 difference per 1# of flour in this case, as I make my NYT bread using 1# of flour and 12.4 oz of warm water by weight).

Speaking of weight, I think a lot of problems could be resolved for bread bakers if they purchased an inexpensive digital scale, and started to convert their recipes to weight measurement rather than volume measurement. Using this method you are guaranteed repeatability which you will not get from volume measurements. I bought my scale at Target for $29.95, and it has proven to be my most valuable baking and cooking tool. I also use it as a postal scale, and for dividing meat and produce into evenly weighed portions for freezing. Its most frequent use, in the consistency category, is for making sandwich rolls and hot dog buns. 2.5 oz of dough makes a perfectly sized hamburger roll.

Many of us here use weight measurement for our baking, and would be happy to share our recipe conversions with you if you get a scale. My NYT recipe by weight is listed above, so you can get started immediately if you have a scale. The salt and yeast are easier done with measuring spoons rather than weight. Flour and liquids are the big culprits when it comes to inconsistency.

Lastly, when I get ready to bake, I cover my scale with a piece of clear plastic wrap to keep flour and/or liquids from getting inside and causing problems.

Sorry if I hijacked the post, but I thought this might help some folks.

JoeV

I have a scale and honestly don't know why I haven't weighed the water any of the times I've made the bread. I'm going to start keeping track of the water weight so I will know when I hit the weight that works best for me. Thanks for the heads up.

Sedagive.
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:40 AM   #368
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Originally Posted by sattie View Post
I have a scale... where is your recipe by weight?
1# All purpose flour
1-1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon Instant Yeast
12.4 oz. Warm water

My flour comes out to just under one pound for 3 cups, so I have rounded it up to one pound of flour, then played with the water to get it right. I think it was 1T of additional water = .40 oz.

When using a digital scale, be sure to place your empty container (I use a lightweight plastic bowl for flour and plastic cup for the water) on the scale, then press the "TARE" button in order to zero out the scale. Do this with each different container that you use, as they each will weigh a different amount.

Joe
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Old 07-22-2008, 09:40 AM   #369
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It's a great bread recipe. So successufl that Le Crueset has made SS knobs for their pots!
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Old 07-30-2008, 02:55 PM   #370
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New York Times Bread

This bread can be baked in many other pans.

You will read about it in the original Gretchen Thread.

I bake mine in my crock pot ceramic pot. The different pans...different shapes. Aria
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