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Old 07-06-2005, 05:16 PM   #21
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Your grandmother was right

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandyj
That Star Gazey Pie sounds quite nice and not too difficult to make - I remember reading a recipe for it long ago - love the name. I think I'm going to give this a go.

DramaQ, your MIL's cornish pastie recipe with the dollop of butter sounds just like my grandmother's. She once told me (confidentially) that if I'm tasting something I made and it doesn't taste quite right, I could always add a dollop of butter! She was cooking and baking right into her 90's and never dieted or knew much about cholesterol - she did eat healthy food - lots of vegetables, but, loved her meat (and the fat on it). She was from a farm. I think her 'secret' was all good things in moderation. -Sandyj
She was right. All good things in moderation. Now if I could just remember that. We grew up on veggies and fresh fruits and berries, and we eat tons of those things, but the "good" things are what we pig out on.
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Old 07-06-2005, 05:45 PM   #22
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Goodweed - it's simple ... my "adopted 3rd mother", who was also my sons godmother, was Welsh.
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Old 07-07-2005, 01:47 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Goodweed - it's simple ... my "adopted 3rd mother", who was also my sons godmother, was Welsh.
All I can say is, too cool .

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-07-2005, 02:00 AM   #24
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Drama Queen; I'm looking forward to your visit. I can't gauruntee that I'll have any fresh fish, but I know a place where I can get good meat, and we have a great selection of veggies to choose from. The fruits aren't bad either.

Let me know what you're interested in having and I'll see what we can come up with. Since we're all addicted to food, and to the cooking process, I'd be glad to invite you into our kitchen and we could see if we can create something extraordinary. I'm game for just about anything.

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Old 07-07-2005, 05:29 AM   #25
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Hi All...
I'm really want to make a very delicious pasties. I can't forget the taste of chicken pasty. And also unfortunately I can't remember it to get the same taste and to make. Everybody has own recipe I think.

Regarding to Pasty, I have new questions... I already had a question about pasty dough that its most important part for me. (I got all my answers) I think then you can fill it whatever you like. But...

1. Is there any step to add spices... Is it so important to make pasty?
2. I'm sorry but what is rutabega? Is it sweet or salty?
3. Oven is important to cook pasty? Bottom side of my pasties are always cooked and it becomes hard to bite. I have mini oven. So while top of my pasties cook well and soft but bottom side...
4. In here pasty culture is not well known. So there is no place to taste it. And also no special pasty blender. And I use my hands to make a pasty dough. If I use knife, it takes more time.
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Old 07-07-2005, 05:54 AM   #26
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Rutebaga is known in Europe as Swede or swedish turnip - it is larger than the French style white ones with purple skins. It is traditional to add it to beef or lamb pasties in Cornwall.
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Old 07-07-2005, 05:59 AM   #27
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Ohh yes I know turnip.. Wow does it really give a good taste...? I will try...
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Old 07-07-2005, 07:56 AM   #28
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To make a proper dough, *** the salt before mixing, then mix enough shorteneing or lard into plain white flour to make little pea-sized balls. The ingredients should be cold. If you use your hands, don't work the dough too much, the less the better. Add just enough water to make the dough balls stick together. Again, the water must be cold.

Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface, cut into ten to 12 inch rounds, and fill with the pre-cooked ingredients. The ingredients should be pre-cooked so you can correct the seasonings before putting into the dough. Add a pat of butter or two, and fold into pasties. Bake and enjoy.

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Old 07-07-2005, 08:41 AM   #29
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I've never seen a cornish pasty which has precooked vegetables and meats in them. All traditional pasties I've ever eaten in Cornwall, whether shop bought or made by friends use raw meat and uncooked veg.

This Cornish site may help msalper, as the woman who wrote it has put illustrations of each step. Just substitute your chicken for beef, and bob's your uncle!
http://www.greenchronicle.co.uk/conn...sty_recipe.htm
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Old 07-07-2005, 09:20 AM   #30
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If we use raw meat or veg., is cooking time enough to cook inside the pasty also. I also use precooked veg. chicken and meat...
And thank you for this web site also. i will check it. It seems to be helpfull like you..
Thanks
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Old 07-07-2005, 09:28 AM   #31
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Saw your note

msalper - I saw an email in my inbox and since I didn't recognize who it was from, I deleted it. I think it was from you, now that I see your name - sorry about that - was just being cautious. - Sandyj
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Old 07-07-2005, 09:50 AM   #32
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No pb. Sandyj- It was about my msn address(msalper@hotmail.com) to talking more about pasties and sausages rolls. Because I everytime have question and I don't stop until I make a very good pasty. :) So if you have a msn you can add me.
Sorry admin. for that. This is not about discussion of cooking.
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Old 07-07-2005, 10:15 AM   #33
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Raw Raw Raw!!!

Raw veggies and meat are a must when making pasties. If you use pre-cooked you'll end up with mush.
The pasties bake in the oven for an hour so there is plenty of time for the chopped ingredients to cook. We recently had a pasties from a bakery north of Traverse City, took one bite and sent them back to the kitchen. They use pre-cooked ingredients and it was like eating paste surrounded by dough. Pasty and paste are NOT the same thing.
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Old 07-07-2005, 10:17 AM   #34
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Thanks Goodweed

Thanks so much for your kind invitation. I would look forward to meeting you. No need to feed us, although we eat anything and everything, but we can discuss this later. I hope our plans don't change.
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Old 07-07-2005, 10:19 AM   #35
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Glad you concur :D pahhhh stees, as the Cornish say is definitely NOT the same as paste! Precooked swede and potato would be a mushy mixture. Not the taste experience that a real pasty should be!
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Old 07-07-2005, 11:03 AM   #36
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Ingredients are OK. We must use raw one.

I will plan to open a cafe in here. And I must present delicious pasties and others to people ofcourse. After cooked my dough turn into a stone :) (I'm joking) Not stone but maybe soft wood :). Anyway.
How do you make your dough without handling? I don't have pasty blender. Maybe I should have one. After mixing flour and butter, I wonder what does "flour with butter" look like? Is it like a breadcrumb? Because I feel, I need to use my hands to crumble completely. Maybe I'm wrong.
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Old 07-07-2005, 11:30 AM   #37
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msalper

I've watched my gran many times make pastry by hand - she would first cut up the butter and lard into small pieces, put them into a chilled bowl - even putting little pieces of ice with the butter/lard to keep it from melting. As she would do this, she would say to me "cold hands? warm heart!".

Working quickly, with those cool hands, she would take a few pieces of butter/lard at a time and place it on the flour - picking up a bit of flour and a bit of butter/lard and "pinching" them together until it became crumbly (yes, like bread crumbs - maybe the pieces will be a little bigger than bread crumbs (peas)), but crumbly all the same. The flour, of course, had already been measured and set out in a little "hill" on her clean counter.

It's after this point where I think mine goes wrong - when I add the little bits of ice water, the dough is either too dry or too wet and sticky, and in panic, I "handle" it too much to fix. This is where I need practise with "feel".

When done, she would gather the dough up into a ball, and refridgerate for at least an hour before rolling out. The rolling out would be done on a clean, lightly floured surface - also working quickly with minimal handling of the dough.

There's a reason for all this 'coldness' - something to do with not allowing too much gluten to form, gluten being the thing that makes the pastry tough.

p.s. I've read that if you take the full amount of lard required and then, instead of just lard, use half that measurement in butter, and half lard, you'll get the good texture from the lard and good flavour from the butter. I think my gran used to just use butter. -Sandy
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Old 07-07-2005, 06:23 PM   #38
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My grandmother used to make the best shortcrust too. I have inherited the gift as well. It's one of those things thats just practice, practice, practice. Keep the kitchen cool is the first thing. I don't turn the oven on until the pastry is made and resting in the fridge. I keep the windows open. I don't make pastry in warm weather, so on a cool day I will make a few batches and put them in the freezer.

Everything Sandyj said is what I do. Cut the butter into cubes then rub into the flour til it resembles fine bread crumbs. You have to use your finger tips only and stop if your hands are getting too hot! My big tip is when you mix the water in, use a knife (bread and butter knife not a sharp one) and use a cutting action (I put the knife in the freezer first) Add the water a teaspoon at a time, and stop just as it starts to come together.

And on the pastie and sausage role topic, I like pasties best in shortcrust and flaky pastry for the sausage rolls. My favourite sausage rolls are from the deli in our village, he makes the greatest ones ever. I would love the recipe but it's secret!!!
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Old 07-07-2005, 06:33 PM   #39
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A tip from my Granny (and my mum's method, too) was to run the cold tap until the water was seriously COLD (and believe me, in Scotland that is REALLY cold!) and then allow it to play over the pulse points in your wrists for a few minutes... Don't know if there's any scientific reality behind it, but I always do it... it works for me
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Old 07-08-2005, 02:44 AM   #40
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Kyles: I have tried to make flaky pastry by using creme cheese instead of butter (half amount both of them). But it was not working for me. Maybe other things affected this. Do you have any clue about it? And in USA, you called "shortening" something I don't know. Could you please explain it to me? So maybe I can find it in here. I asked my friend who lives in Sanfranciso told me that "shortening" is like an additive for pastry, pie and tart dough.
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