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Old 07-02-2005, 09:18 PM   #1
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Pasties

Does anyone have a recipe for cornish pasties - or for that matter, sausage rolls? This is something my gran used to make, and was standard fare at all family celebrations. Mainly, I'd like to have a standard pastry recipe - I think a shortcrust pastry would be good, but I've had sausage rolls in flaky pastry, and that was actually very nice (and decadent). My gran used to just pull out the ingredients and get going - forget precise measuring, she had the feel of it. Wish I was that good! - Sandyj

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Old 07-03-2005, 04:59 AM   #2
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If you have a recipe from your grandmother - you've got a start on figuring this out. If you remember how she made them, that's another clue. If you remember what they tasted like - you might be able to figure out "the" recipe to use. This is one dish that varies by the cook and what was available to go into it - as variations on a basic theme.

The shortcrust pastry was, originally, probably either lard (most likely) or butter - depends on what was on hand ... although some "updated" recipes will use shortning - plus flour and water.

As for the meat in the filling - it could be beef, lamb, mutton or sometimes pork. And, it would generally have either turnips or rutabaga - with potatoes and with/without carrots. Seasonings could be as simple as salt and pepper, or might include parsley, or a mixture of other herbs, and might even include spices like nutmeg. While generally baked, they could also be fried - and size was up to the cook and the preference of the miner eating it.

I've learned that this is a food of the common man - one without much money - that was made from bits and scraps and things that were available. There is no one "definitive" recipe.

Here are a couple of places to start looking to find a recipe that "sounds" like what your gran made ....

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=pasty+recipe

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=pastie+recipe
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Old 07-03-2005, 06:58 AM   #3
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Here's my family recipe for sausage rolls. Don't know whether your sausage meat is the same as British stuff, though!

SAUSAGE ROLLS

500g pork sausage meat - good quality
1 medium onion
500g shortcrust or puff pastry (puff is more traditional but we like shortcrust!)
1/4 teaspoon salt/plenty of freshly ground black pepper
Milk or beaten egg as a glaze


Preheat the oven to Gas mark 8.

Season the meat and add finely chopped onion and mix together well. Using your hands, roll sausage meat out to a 'rope' (not too thin - and use a little flour to stop the sausagement sticking to the work surface).

Roll out the pastry to a rectangle about 50cm by 40cm. Cut into three strips lengthways. Divide the sausage rope into 3 portions and place each part along the edge of one strip of pastry.

Rub a little water along the opposite edges of the pastry. Starting at the sausage meat side, roll over the pastry towards the other side, until you have formed a roll with the seam at the bottom. Gently firm down.

Cut each log into about 8 rolls. Using kitchen scissors, cut three diagonal slits in the top of each roll. Brush a little milk or egg wash over each one to glaze.

Place the sausage rolls on baking sheets. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to Gas mark 6 - and cook for a further 20 minutes, or until cooked.

These can be eaten hot or cold. You can make them a few days in advance and keep them in an airtight container and just pop back into the office to heat through just before required.
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Old 07-03-2005, 11:00 PM   #4
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Thank you - I'm trying tomorrow

Thanks for your replies and recipes.
I remember how my gran's pies tasted (and smelled), and yes, she didn't really use a recipe because she put into them whatever was on hand - often leftover Sunday meat (lamb, mutton etc.) and yes, turnips, rutabaga or diced potatoes. There was also a cafe (tea shop) near where we used to live that made the most divine pasties and sausage rolls - they used puff pastry, my Gran used shortcrust (lard butter flour, ice water, cold hands). The cafe was the Ramona Cafe in Uitenhage, Eastern Cape, South Africa. It was owned by a Greek family (Michaelides (sp?)). They closed it in the '90s. Their pie filling was always sausage meat with a 'sage' and pepper kind of a taste. I made what I hoped was something similar using pork sausage, ground beef and sage/white pepper/salt - but I made my own pastry (basically shortcrust). I'm just learning, and I think I handled the pastry too much, so it wasn't as flaky and crumbly. It froze well, though. I'm just dying for a lovely pie and a really good cup of tea (to restore my soul!!!). I am trying out your recipe tomorrow in honour of
4th of July (starters for a party) - Sandyj
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Old 07-03-2005, 11:04 PM   #5
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ooh, forgot this...

Yes, I agree, meat pies seem to be in every culture. I've had delicious rooties (sp?) and samoosas (India) and Empanadas (Spanish ?), Cornish pasties, my grans pasties, and, recently, dumplings at a Chinese restaurant. Ag, isn't it lovely? -Sandyj
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Old 07-04-2005, 03:08 AM   #6
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You're right - the less you handle the dough the better it will be. It's just like a pie crust.

I'm lazy these days - I make my shortcrust pastry in my food processor. I cube the cold lard into about 1/4 inch pieces, and toss them and the flour into a covered bowl - and put that and the steel blade and work bowl from my food processor into the fridge for a couple of hours. I then add the lard and flour to the food processor - give it 10-15 1-second pulses, continue to pulse and add ice water until it's the right texture (usually about 5 more pulses) .... dump it out onto the counter, form it quickly into a disc about 6-inchs in diameter, wrap in plastic wrap, and pop it back in the fridge for about 2 hours (allows the lard to firm back up, any gluten that developed to relax, and gives time for the flour to fully hydrate). Then it's just a matter of rolling it out ....
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Old 07-04-2005, 03:29 AM   #7
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Do a search on here for Cornish pasties - I've posted a link to a genuine Cornish site, and I've used that recipe and consider it is 'authentic' (I visit Cornwall at least once a year!) However, there are probably as many Cornish recipes for pasties as there are Cornish cooks!
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Old 07-05-2005, 01:28 PM   #8
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Follow up...

Ishbel: I made the sausage rolls from your recipe, and they did come out very nicely - I made my own shortcrust pastry but I bought the sausage meat that came in a tube - no casing on it. It tastes like breakfast sause (pork/sage) and I added the onion and some seasoning to it. I could actually make my own, but this was a shortcut.

Michael: I've wanted a food processor for long time to do pastry and such, but have been nervous that I wouldn't use it often. Space in my kitchen is horribly limited. Now I'm torn between a food processor and a standing mixer with the grinder attachment so I could make my own sausage.

I couldn't locate the link to the Cornish website. I'm new to this - perhaps I'm not looking in the right place?
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Old 07-05-2005, 05:33 PM   #9
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Glad the sausage rolls turned out well!

Here's the Cornish Light site. Have a look at the photographs - they illustrate the traditional shape and filling!

http://www.cornishlight.co.uk/cornish-pasty.htm
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Old 07-05-2005, 06:01 PM   #10
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Michael; You continue to amaze me. I live in pastie country. My mother co-owned a bakery and that was one of their main products. I've been eating pasties most of my life, and have been making them for years. But as I said, Upper Peninsula Michigan IS pastie country. We used to have copper and iron mines galore, especially in the Western U.P.

But you're in Fort Worth, Texas. I can't imagin you have many Cornish settlers in your area. You have either traveled substantially, or are great at research, or both. You nailed what a pastie is. Good job my freind. Kudos.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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