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Old 02-01-2005, 12:10 PM   #1
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Question re Bakers Percentage and the CIA

Not sure where this should go?...

I know what the Bakers' Percentage is and how to calculate so it you don't have to enlighten me there - my questions is about the forumula shown for some of the bread recipes in Baking and Pastry by the Culinary Institute of America (Wiley, 2004 edition). i can't figure out the formula they're using to calculate the percentages and the book is no help. :? :?

For example, take a look at this recipe, copied verbatim from the book. The percentages in the "Final Dough" part are not Bakers Percentage but my mathematically feeble mind can't figure out how they're getting the % values they're printing.
Code:
Lean Dough with Biga [p 159]

               Pct     Oz / Fl Oz    Gm / Ml
               ------------------------------
Biga
Bread flour    100.00%   24.00       680
Water           55.00%   13.25       398
Instant yeast    0.03%   pinch       pinch

Final Dough
Bread flour     70.00%   56.00      1590
Water           50.60%   40.50      1220
Instant yeast    0.63%    0.50        14
Biga{above)     46.60%   37.25      1060
Salt             2.20%    1.75        50
Can anyone enlighten me? TIA

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Old 02-01-2005, 05:24 PM   #2
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I've got an old (1979) baker's manual written by the head baking/pastry instructor at the CIA - boy does it leave a lot to the imagination! It was no help here, either, but I did manage to figure out what they did.

The % for water and yeast in the biga are based on the weight of the flour in the biga. But, the % in the final dough are based on the total weight of flour (biga + final dough flour = 80 oz in this example). So, take any weight (oz) in the final dough and divide by 80 and you get the %.
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Old 02-01-2005, 06:07 PM   #3
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sub, we need to find a gradulate of Stanford who has a PhD in physics for this one. I was a wiz at math, but I have not clue what message they are sending out. :?
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Old 02-01-2005, 08:05 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
The % for water and yeast in the biga are based on the weight of the flour in the biga.
Exactly - this is what I understand as the bakers' percentage, where the divisor is the amount (by weight) of the flour and all other ingredients are expressed as a % of this amount

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
But, the % in the final dough are based on the total weight of flour (biga + final dough flour = 80 oz in this example). So, take any weight (oz) in the final dough and divide by 80 and you get the %.
to Michael in FtW

Thanks to all who took the time to reply :D This was driving me nuts, in part b/c the bakers' percentage in this book was sometimes presented in the "normal" manner and at times this way. Given Michal's explanation plus a review of the recipes in the book, I think now I understand their logic.
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Old 02-01-2005, 10:47 PM   #5
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Sub - no problem ... just took a few minutes to untangle.

Using the straight (dump) method it would have been obvious - but they threw us a twist in how they calculated things in the "sponge" method.
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Old 02-02-2005, 12:55 AM   #6
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Michael,

What the F$"%! does the CIA have to do with BAKING BREAD????

Did I misunderstand something here?
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Old 02-02-2005, 05:51 AM   #7
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Lol, Darkstream, the 'CIA' here is the 'Culinary Institute of America' :)
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Old 02-02-2005, 06:59 AM   #8
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someone should open a "scotland yard-long sandwich shoppe"... :D
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Old 02-02-2005, 03:46 PM   #9
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Wow!!

Guess I did.

Perhaps my American English needs a bit of polishing.

Still, I'm glad YOU ALL thought it was funny.

I am minded of " ....two great peoples seperated by a common language......."
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Old 02-02-2005, 08:26 PM   #10
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Ah, don't feel bad Dark ... I'm still trying to find an American equivalent measurement for an English "knob" of butter!
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