"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-14-2006, 01:36 PM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 42
Honest, multiple rises works. I've done it many times. Only a small minority of total batches made (usually I schedule correctly), but many nonetheless.

As for proofing temp, oh no, you can't proof at 150 degrees. The yeast checks out at around 110 to 120 degrees (depending on strain and how long at temp). The simplest answer is to go with your 68 degree room temp and expect about a three hour first rise. If you want to speed things up, preheat the oven only to 100 degrees, then put in the dough. If your oven doesn't hold heat well, repeat the cycle as needed (remove the dough while running the burner). Or you can put a heating pad in the bottom of the oven, but may need to crack the door to prevent overheating (monitor oven temp with a thermometer). If this comes up a lot, consider building a proofing box.
__________________

__________________
PBear42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 01:39 PM   #12
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Man you guys are quick! Thanks for the info! I think I will just plan on a longer rise rather than muck about with the oven temp. And I believe you on the multiple rise thing PBear, I've just only ever done two. I'm scared to do more!

OK, I'm going to go slap some dough in to rise. Be right back.
__________________

__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 02:16 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,373
Alix, the bread you're making neds to rise in 65-70 heat, and it rises for 5 hours...Seems forever but emmmm.
as to letting it cool for three hours, well to tell the truth, I didn't, just be careful when you cut it not to squish it
kadesma
__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2006, 01:52 AM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: N. Bellmore
Posts: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
The first rise of my bread was pretty pathetic. Not double by any means. Did I kill the yeast (proofing too warm? too much salt?) old yeast? or was I not patient enough (only 45 minutes?)

I did a punch down and am on my second rise now. I'm hoping like heck it rises this time.

8 oz water
4 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1.5 tbsp dry milk powder
2 cups flour
3/4 cup oatmeal
1/2 cup cracked wheat
1.25 tsp salt
1.5 tsp active yeast (my date says it is fine)

Usual bread making routine. Knead, rise, punchdown and shape into loaf, rise again and bake.

Help please?
Rising depends on many things, Room temperature, strength of the yeast art two of them. Most bread recipes that I am familiar with call for a tablespoon of yeast. You may not be using enough. Proofing the yeast helps. Dissolve it in a little water and sugar, before combining it with the rest of your liquid ingredients. You could consider adding your white flour and sugar to the proofed yeast and letting it rise to a sponge before adding the other ingredients and kneading the whole. If 8 oz. of water is 2 cups, and you are using 2 cups of white flour, you will have stirrable batter, to which you are adding 1 1/2 cups of heavy grain, it doesnt sound as if you have a very kneadable dough if that is all you are using.
__________________
DinaFine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2006, 04:51 AM   #15
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
Lots of folks have hit on lots of points. I don't really understand how you could expect this dough to rise in 45 minutes. It is a complex dough with heavy ingredients and has very little (comparatively to most bread recipes) yeast--to the point that it may even be a flawed recipe in that respect. But it will definitely take longer to rise. You have to let the dough rise to double in order for the bread to develop its internal structure.
Multiple risings do not harm bread--it can develop more flavor with the yeast fermentation. Bread is pretty forgiving. If your bread has risen to a point and it isn't convenient to bake it, punch it down and let it rise again.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2006, 04:27 PM   #16
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
DinaFine, 8oz of water is one cup. So the dough is very kneadable.

Candocook, 45 minutes is what the recipe says, and I have done it perfectly many times that way. I don't think the recipe is flawed, just the baker. LOL

In case anyone is wondering, I have since learned that my yeast, while saying it is fine, is the issue. Fresh yeast on its way. Thanks for all your help.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 12:12 AM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 42
Now I'm puzzled. In the OP, you mentioned proofing the yeast, wondering whether it was too warm. I passed over that because, almost by definition, if the yeast proofed, it wasn't too warm. Maybe you're using the term differently than do I. To me, proofing means dissolving the yeast in little warm water, stirring in a touch of sugar and seeing if a layer of bubbles rises to the surface within a reasonable time (say, five minutes). How do you mean the term?
__________________
PBear42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 07:03 AM   #18
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBear42
Now I'm puzzled. In the OP, you mentioned proofing the yeast, wondering whether it was too warm. I passed over that because, almost by definition, if the yeast proofed, it wasn't too warm. Maybe you're using the term differently than do I. To me, proofing means dissolving the yeast in little warm water, stirring in a touch of sugar and seeing if a layer of bubbles rises to the surface within a reasonable time (say, five minutes). How do you mean the term?
That is what it also means to me and I even started a post much like yours. However, I googled and find that proofing also seems to mean "rising", in some vernacular. I don't use it that way. I use "rise" for dough and "proofing" for yeast activity prior to addition to ingredients.
And Alix seems to have heated an oven to 150* for a "proofing oven" for rising--which IS too hot.

And, I will also say that my kitchen is pretty regularly at 64* in winter and I have no trouble getting bread to rise--for as long as I have made bread. It could be slower, but I never go by time--just looks and whatever it takes to get to where it should be.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 01:02 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candocook
And, I will also say that my kitchen is pretty regularly at 64* in winter and I have no trouble getting bread to rise--for as long as I have made bread. It could be slower, but I never go by time--just looks and whatever it takes to get to where it should be.
Although I explained it poorly, the lower wintertime temperature in the kitchen was my top suspect. Starting at about 75*F, a 17*F change in temperature halves or doubles the rising time.
__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 02:11 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
I don't doubt at all it could be that and I thought you covered it very well. As I say, I just don't pay attention to times since with bread I find many of the measurements to be quite relative. It isn't like a cake with a predictable amount of leavening and timing.
__________________

__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.