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Old 12-20-2006, 06:16 PM   #31
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Has anyone experienced using natural yeast? I saw a show featuring a baker using yeast he had made from cabbage leaves.
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Old 12-20-2006, 06:23 PM   #32
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I don't know about cabbage leaves, but there are some sourdough bakers here, which is natural yeast of course.

How did he go about making and harvesting the cabbage yeast?
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Old 12-20-2006, 06:40 PM   #33
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Seems like he just wet the leaf with water and waited. He had a specialty bakery in New York. He showed some cabbage leaves in mason type jars.
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Old 12-22-2006, 06:22 AM   #34
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Hello Alix

U could try the following, to improve the rising.
A little more yeast
A little more sugar/honey
I often leave my bread, to rise in a 50C oven, for over an hour. If the oven is not warm enough, the yeast will not work.
Make sure the water u use, to mix the bread, is not so hot, that u cant put your finger in it, for 10 seconds.
Make sure u use as much liquid as u can. The wetter the dough, the more it seems to rise.
Put a bowl of water in the oven, when the bread is rising and baking.
When the bread is rising, put a cloth over the container it is in.

Mel
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Old 12-22-2006, 04:03 PM   #35
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[quote=StirBlue]Has anyone experienced using natural yeast? I saw a show featuring a baker using yeast he had made from cabbage leaves.[

Hi Stirblue: I have made natural yeast by pureeing grapes and mixing them with flour and water and waiting for it to fement. I understand that you can do this with many types of fruit or vegetables, so why not cabbage leaves? i would probably grind them in a food processor first, but maybe there are other ways. Cabbage should be easy to ferment: Saurkraut would be an example.

I bake with only natural yeast now, which is a sourdough starter that I keep in the refrigerator, and I have had them going for a very long time, so they have had a chance to get strong, and I get very good results. I usually can have bread in two days, maybe three tops. If I know I cant get to it, I just put the kneaded dough in the refrigerator, and bAKE IT when I can. ]
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Old 12-24-2006, 06:35 AM   #36
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Hello Alix

I also noticed, when i am baking, that the heavier the bread, the less it rises. Bread with oatmeal and cracked wheat will not increase in size, as much as bread made with just white flour.

When i put something in the bread, which releases moisture, it also rises more. Examples of things which release moisture would be onions or apples.

Mel
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Old 12-24-2006, 06:50 AM   #37
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Hello Kadesma

I did not even know, that the bread would rise, without putting it in a very warm place.
One learns something new, everyday. This means i could make the bread, on Summer evenings and just leave it over night to rise, and then bake, in the morning. I think i will try that.
Does yours rise, without applying extra heat, in Winter?

Mel
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Old 12-24-2006, 07:44 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel!
Hello Kadesma

I did not even know, that the bread would rise, without putting it in a very warm place.
One learns something new, everyday. This means i could make the bread, on Summer evenings and just leave it over night to rise, and then bake, in the morning. I think i will try that.
Does yours rise, without applying extra heat, in Winter?
Mel
hi Mel,

Kadesma was making the point that bread will rise even if the temperature is cool (65-70 F), it just takes longer than if the temperature was a little warmer.

If you want it to rise overnight, put the bowl (covered with plastic wrap) in your refrigerator. Don't try an overnight rise letting the dough sitting on your counter, especially in summer. In warm or hot weather, the dough would ferment far too much left overnight this way, and your bread would end up tasting sour or too yeasty.

A slow rise in the bowl contributes to the flavor of many breads. Temperatures above 85 F bring their own challenges to bread baking, since the warmer temp (especially if climbing into the 90s) can make the bread rise too fast for good flavor development. In summer especially, the refrigerator rise is your friend.

FYI, yeast is deactivated (stops multiplying - goes dormant) at 40 F. Bread will continue to rise until the entire mass of dough reaches this temp. Bread should rise reliably if the temp in your kitchen is in the mid 50s F or higher (though honestly, the coldest my kitchen gets is the low 60s F).

The rate at which dough rises is also affected by the temperature of the liquid, as well as the room temp. If the temp is hot, you can use colder liquid in the beginning to slow the rise. If it is cold, use warmer liquid (warm - up to about 80 F - not hot, since it will kill off the yeast) to compensate for the lower temp in your kitchen.
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Old 12-24-2006, 10:18 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel!
Hello Kadesma

I did not even know, that the bread would rise, without putting it in a very warm place.
One learns something new, everyday. This means i could make the bread, on Summer evenings and just leave it over night to rise, and then bake, in the morning. I think i will try that.
Does yours rise, without applying extra heat, in Winter?

Mel
Bread will rise in the refrigerator if the ingredients are active and "right". My bread rises on my counter at 64*.
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Old 12-24-2006, 10:45 AM   #40
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Alix,
Bread can be a pretty tricky thing. With a regular-rise type recipe the rise can take a couple of hours.
Have you ever tried a "cool-rise" recipe? If you have the time, you can do the mixing and kneading and let the dough rise in the fridge fro a few hours or even overnight. It's my favorite!
Linda
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