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Old 11-08-2005, 07:20 PM   #1
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ADD or ADHD a bit long.

I didn't really know where to start this thread. I figure this is as good a place as any.

A little about myself... I'm 34 years old and have been cooking since I was 4. Obviousely I was not creating elaborate meals but at that age I was trusted in the kitchen with the stove, knives, fridge, etc. I love cooking. I feel I truly have a passion for it. Right now I'm in the middle of building a kitchen in my barn. I call it my ultimate kitchen. It will have 2 of everything including a lounge area and wine cellar. More about my kitchen in a different thread.

Anyway, about 6 months ago I was diagnosed with Adult ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). I have been on meds and have been seeing a therapist since my diagnosis. One of my biggest problems is I had no self control to simply sit down and read a book to the very end. I didn't do well in school but I scored very highly on my SAT's.

My day job is I'm a carpenter. I also own a party rental business. While talking to my therapist I told him I was very interested in cooking. He then told me that many ADHDers find comfort in cooking because even though recipes are followed, they can be easily changed / modified at the chef's will. That really made sense to me.

With that said... Does anyone else here suffer from ADD or ADHD? If so, do you notice the symptoms while cooking? Do you feel more at home while cooking? Enlighten me please

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Old 11-08-2005, 07:31 PM   #2
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My youngest son has ADHD, but, I don't let him in the kitchen too often
Not because of the ADHD, but, because, the kitchen is my area and I don't want anyone messing with it.
He does cook sometimes, he will not read directions, he just wants me to tell him how to do it. I'll have to ask him how he feels when he's cooking.
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Old 11-08-2005, 07:38 PM   #3
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I don't have it quite that bad. The problem I see with most ADHDers is that they have a problem with precision. Cooking isn't nearly as precise as, say, brain surgery. That's probably why I love to cook stir fry and casseroles so much That's also why I never really had a fondness for baking. Baking is way too involved and intricate for me to absorb.
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Old 11-08-2005, 07:51 PM   #4
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My son also is ADD... he's 21 now and
he's a pretty good cook. But will not read a recipe either.
He calls quite often to ask me how to make something. I tell
him and he does it his way. His way is sometimes better than mine.
He really has come up with some good stuff.
School involved reading and concentraiting... He hated it. He's a very creative boy. I think that's why he likes to cook. He doesn't do much baking either Home Chef. Like you said "it's too involved."

I don't know how he feels while he's cooking but
I do know that if he makes something that he really likes
it makes him feel proud and happy. That's good for everyone but
I think it's really important for him to find things he's good at since he feels like he's 'not good enough" at other things.
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Old 11-08-2005, 08:32 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdswife
I think it's really important for him to find things he's good at since he feels like he's 'not good enough" at other things.
That's exactly how I feel. I'm far from a perfectionist but I never seem to be satisfied with my work outside of cooking.
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Old 11-09-2005, 04:37 AM   #6
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Smile

I too have ADHD. Writing helps, it slows you down and makes you think deeper thoughts. I read more now than I ever did, But I have to be interested in what I am reading, You too may find this to be true !
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Old 11-09-2005, 09:14 AM   #7
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im a 34 year old guy with this odd combo: ADD and OCD (obsesive compulsive disorder).

basicaly i have a very hard time concentrating on any one thing and I get distracted very easily. but when i do "lock in" on something...i get complete tunnel vision and cannot be pulled away until the mission is complete.

its has its ups and downs as you can imagine.

however...i have always had a love for cooking, and until now, never realy thought much about the logic in your post...but it certainly makes sence!

ADD'ers of the world unite and feed the hungry!!
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Old 11-09-2005, 12:26 PM   #8
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Just moved this to the chat section out of the jokes section. This is too serious to be joke material.
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Old 11-09-2005, 03:10 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mugsy27
im a 34 year old guy with this odd combo: ADD and OCD (obsesive compulsive disorder).

basicaly i have a very hard time concentrating on any one thing and I get distracted very easily. but when i do "lock in" on something...i get complete tunnel vision and cannot be pulled away until the mission is complete.
THAT is Maidrite to a tee!

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Old 11-09-2005, 03:25 PM   #10
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My son is fine as long as he's doing something. He loves to draw. He's very good at it too. I might just get him in the kitchen with me more often and see what he thinks about cooking.
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Old 11-09-2005, 04:04 PM   #11
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Sort of an errant thought...but I want your opinions on it.

I don't hear of ADHD in cultures that are not as um...industrialized as we are. I sort of wonder if ADHD is only considered a detriment in our type of society and if it is not somehow inextricably linked to the hunting genes in the brain? Men are much more affected than women and it would appear to me that ADHD would be a definite asset to a hunter. So, what do you think?
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Old 11-09-2005, 04:11 PM   #12
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They now think that a lot of famous leaders had ADD or ADHD, it was just never diagnosed then, I'm trying to think of examples but my pregnancy brain has blanked them!!! I have a feeling one was Napoleon. Its like Aspergers syndrome, once you label it then it seems to become more of a "problem" sometimes than just a personality trait. I think the hardest time for people with ADD and ADHD is their school years because we really expect everyone to conform to a certain extent and they don't "fit in" as well but later on when they get out into the world they can make their own niche and be fulfillled. (hope that makes sense) I have seen some children helped brilliantly by medication whilst others it doesn't work for, for some kids diet can make a major difference too.
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Old 11-09-2005, 04:16 PM   #13
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mrsmac! Good to see you back! I didn't realize you were expecting, congratulations!

I agree with you about the labelling thing. I sometimes wish we would label a bit less often. I HAVE however seen children respond amazingly well to medications. They (meds) need to be dispensed only by a psychiatrist IMHO though. Very often GPs miss the mark a bit. No offense intended to the GPs, I respect them immensely! I just believe this is more specialized and needs to be treated as such.
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Old 11-09-2005, 04:26 PM   #14
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i don't want to insult anyone here, as i am far from being any kind of expert on this, but it seems that add/adhd may be getting over-diagnosed. of course there are true undeniable cases of this. but, as mrsmac said (btw, congrats, when?), some of it appears to be a personality trait, and not a detrimental syndrome. i am completely scatterbrained in the normal world, to the point that i've actually looked down to see if i remebered to put on pants while standing in line at the market (for a split second it is a very uncomfortable thought, no kidding! hey, it's hard to remember all of the stuff i need to pick up, AND get dressed). but i have always been able to apply myself without too much effort on higher order type of intellectual pursuits, so i don't think i have add, or adhd, but that i'm just rather weird.
do you think the labelling of such, especially with children, could be as detrimental as the actual disease?
i wonder if a different type of educational system would work, such as montessori and the like.
as i said, i hope i have not offended anyone who suffers from, or who cares for someone with add. just my thoughts on this.
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Old 11-09-2005, 05:03 PM   #15
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Not offended at all
one of the things I like most about
this site is hearing other opinions.

And I do agree that putting lables on kids/people is bad but... it's the way of the world. We just have to learn to deal with it.
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Old 11-09-2005, 05:58 PM   #16
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I agree. Labels can be bad. Recently I came upon my old grade school report cards. After reading through them I realizes I had been afflicted with this all my life. Many comments like "Chris is a great student. Very smart. If only he would apply himself more." were the common thread from kindergarden to my senior year in HS. Now that I am on meds I have noticed a difference in tackling my projects. Most of them now actually get done. I still can't read a book through to the end. I'm sure it will happen though in due time.

And, to be more specific, I have been diagnosed with ADHD, OCD, and depression. I know that sounds like I'm a basket case but you wouldn't know it if we just met and are hanging out somewhere. I have pretty good control over most of my emotions and OCD ticks. I still have to wash my hands all the time, especially AFTER a meal. Wierd, huh?
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Old 11-10-2005, 11:07 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
i don't want to insult anyone here, as i am far from being any kind of expert on this, but it seems that add/adhd may be getting over-diagnosed. of course there are true undeniable cases of this. but, as mrsmac said (btw, congrats, when?), some of it appears to be a personality trait, and not a detrimental syndrome. i am completely scatterbrained in the normal world, to the point that i've actually looked down to see if i remebered to put on pants while standing in line at the market (for a split second it is a very uncomfortable thought, no kidding! hey, it's hard to remember all of the stuff i need to pick up, AND get dressed). but i have always been able to apply myself without too much effort on higher order type of intellectual pursuits, so i don't think i have add, or adhd, but that i'm just rather weird.
do you think the labelling of such, especially with children, could be as detrimental as the actual disease?
i wonder if a different type of educational system would work, such as montessori and the like.
as i said, i hope i have not offended anyone who suffers from, or who cares for someone with add. just my thoughts on this.
Maybe ADHD is a man thing like Alix said, It might be a man thing ?????
It's one of those had to be theres !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I had to take Ritalin when I was a young boy !
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Old 11-11-2005, 08:47 AM   #18
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I definitely think it is more readily diagnosed in males but I think it affects everyone equally.

I know this sounds weirsd but it's kinda comforting to see that there are quite a few people here with experience on the subject. Anyone put anymore thought into if they feel theyre cooking is a result of their ADD / ADHD?
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Old 11-11-2005, 06:35 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Home chef
I definitely think it is more readily diagnosed in males but I think it affects everyone equally.

I know this sounds weirsd but it's kinda comforting to see that there are quite a few people here with experience on the subject. Anyone put anymore thought into if they feel theyre cooking is a result of their ADD / ADHD?
That could be although I think the "LOCKED IN" mode is there and when you are ADHD I think things that interest you become the "LOCKED IN" things that you excel in !
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Old 11-12-2005, 01:50 AM   #20
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All of the ADHD children I have known have been characterised by the fact they don't "lock in" to anything, one psychiatrist told me that this was a symptom of full blown ADD/ HD was that they can't concentrate on anything even if it really interests them. I have also noticed that all the ADD children I have known are boys, it is much more common in boys for some reason. Sometimes here people use it as a convenient diagnosis for bad behaviour and undisciplined children which is sad for those children who are truly affected, we went through a phase where doctors were mady medicating every child but that has changed now thankfully. I have noticed in teaching we are seeing much more Aspergers syndrome than ADD now, you start wondering about labelling fads sometimes don't you?
Anyway sorry to rave on, thanks for the congrats too, I'm not due til 5th June but we are all very excited.
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