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Old 07-31-2006, 08:39 PM   #1
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Are tomatoes toxic to dogs?

I know the stems and leaves are toxic, but is the actual tomatoe toxic to dogs? I cant seem to find info that indicates that they are, though my dog seems to acting very unsettled tonight. He seems as if he wants to throw up, he's panting. I gave him about 4 cherry tomatoes today from the garden. He loves vegetables. He's definately not himself. Anyone?

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Old 07-31-2006, 08:50 PM   #2
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While I am unsure if tomatoes are toxic to dogs, they do contain more acid than would be considered good for their digestion. Our dogs love tomatoes, but I limit them to two small pieces, twice per week.
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Old 07-31-2006, 08:55 PM   #3
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The answer is yes, according to the ASPCA. I found this in an article posted on the society's webpage:

POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS PLANTS
Tomatoes
Tomatoes (
Solanum lycopersicum)
belong to the nightshade family.

Ingestion of the greenery, flowers, and
green fruit can cause clinical problems
in dogs and cats. Tomatine, an alkaloid
related to solanine, is the agent
that is concentrated in the young fruit
and plant. As the plant ripens, the
tomatine is metabolized. Therefore,
ripe tomatoes are less likely to be
problematic for animals. Clinical signs
include gastrointestinal (GI) upset, cardiac
effects, and central nervous system
signs (e.g., ataxia, muscle weakness,
tremors, seizures), resulting from
cholinesterase inhibition. Because
tomatine is very poorly absorbed
orally, systemic effects are rare. As
with all intoxications, the severity of
clinical signs depends on the amount
ingested. Treatment usually consists of
symptomatic and supportive care.
2

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Old 07-31-2006, 09:08 PM   #4
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I gave my dog the ripe cherry tomatoe, no stem at all or leaf. Though who knows, he may have ingested some of the leaf because I was picking alot of leaves off that didnt need to be on the tomatoe plant, and left the leaves on the ground.

If he did ingest any of the leaf it was a small portion, because my hubby said he saw him try to grab a bit of leaf but stopped him. Apparently he did get some. He is cooling down now in the ac room, his breathing is a bit fast, his nose is dry, but so I use a cool wet cloth to wet his face, ears, and nose. I can tell he needs to vomit but so far he cannot seem to do it.

He lays by me feet, and sticks close to me when he is ill. Poor thing. How stupid am I to bring him out with me while pruning my tomatoes. I'll keep a close watch on him tonight. Thanks for your help Fryboy and grahamkerr.
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Old 07-31-2006, 09:51 PM   #5
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Other potential dangers:
Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches and apricots, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide posioning)
Potato peelings and green looking potatoes
Rhubarb leaves
Mouldy/spoiled foods
Alcohol
Yeast dough
Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)
Hops (used in home brewing)
Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)
Broccoli (in large amounts)
Raisins and grapes
Cigarettes, tobacco, cigars ( the mind boggles thinking about a pooch with a fag perched between its lips and a glass of hooch in the other....lolol)

These are in addition to chocolate and onions which most people are aware of.
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Old 07-31-2006, 10:23 PM   #6
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I hope your doggie gets well quickly. I've attached a photo of my dog, Chelsea, an 11-year-old mix of German and Australian shepherds (this photo is about four years old). Maybe it will cheer up your pooch.
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Old 07-31-2006, 10:36 PM   #7
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I beg to differ on the tomato thing.
I've fed my dog tomato juice & tomatoes daily for years!!!
She loves it and it neutralizes the urine so there are no spots on the grass!
I learned this from more than a few dog books.
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Old 07-31-2006, 10:49 PM   #8
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My dog has finally calmed down. He's not panting now, he's sleeping comfortably. He hasnt vomited so I guess he doesnt need to do so. Thanks Jkath, and Fryboy your dog is a cutie by the pool keeping cool, and thanks to Lynan for that list because there are many things I put into my compost that I should recheck.
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Old 08-01-2006, 11:27 AM   #9
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My dogslove tomatoes and though I don't give them to them with any regularity, they have never shown any sign of illness. My beagle used to love to root in the tomato patch and would come out covered with bright green tomato dust.

But then again they crave Hieneken (I have given them tiny sips, since there is something about the smell that drives them crazy). I used to give them grapes until I found out it was bad. The love cooked broccoli.

Schnitzel, a 16 pound dachshund (see photo) once ate an entire loaf of bread dough as it sat on the radiator to rise. This did necessitate a trip to the vet but he exhibited no signs of distress. Similarly, he ate 40 of the greyhound's thyroid pills and was ok.

Amber -- my boys are panting A LOT even in the AC and they are both quite old -- I think the humidity may be affecting them.

Also green potatoes are toxic to humans as well. Peel all signs of green off before you eat.
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Old 08-01-2006, 11:51 AM   #10
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Thank you for posting this and letting us know. I love my little baby so it is good to be warned about dangers.

=============================

Quote:
Originally Posted by FryBoy
The answer is yes, according to the ASPCA. I found this in an article posted on the society's webpage:


POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS PLANTS

Tomatoes

Tomatoes (
Solanum lycopersicum)


belong to the nightshade family.


Ingestion of the greenery, flowers, and
green fruit can cause clinical problems
in dogs and cats. Tomatine, an alkaloid
related to solanine, is the agent
that is concentrated in the young fruit
and plant. As the plant ripens, the
tomatine is metabolized. Therefore,
ripe tomatoes are less likely to be
problematic for animals. Clinical signs
include gastrointestinal (GI) upset, cardiac
effects, and central nervous system
signs (e.g., ataxia, muscle weakness,
tremors, seizures), resulting from
cholinesterase inhibition. Because
tomatine is very poorly absorbed
orally, systemic effects are rare. As
with all intoxications, the severity of

clinical signs depends on the amount

ingested. Treatment usually consists of

symptomatic and supportive care.
2


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