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Old 06-06-2012, 09:57 PM   #11
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I'm afraid that after ten years of living in a 160 year old house, we know that almost any job we might start winds up being a bust, so we're better off waiting and saving and hiring a pro. Even minor jobs seem to wind up involving a lot more than our abilities, and more often than not, we spend the money for DIY jobs, then turn around and spend money for the pros. In spite of trying to research first, we find we didn't buy the right products, or a little job done uncovers major stuff that needs to be done right when we thought it was a cosmetic job.
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Old 06-07-2012, 03:07 AM   #12
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As a total DIY'er I'm constantly overwhelmed by the number of on-going projects I've got going around the house. I get tired of working on one project and will move on to another, then come back to the one I left off 6 months ago....and so on. It's never ending. This is what happens if you're too cheap to hire a contractor.
That is my pet peeve--projects that don't get finished. I have to live with the unfinished projects, so I like to finish a project before moving onto another project. That doesn't always work. I see the house in the City as a work in progress. It isn't that I'm too cheap to hire a contractor--being self-employed in today's economy, I can't justify the money, so have to do it myself/ourselves. I think we've done well--we have replaced the kitchen counter top with an ash butcher block top. Total cost was under $100. Labor time was 4 weeks. Concrete sink/vanity in the bathroom was $90 in materials, labor time 4 weeks. hardwood floor in the bedroom, materials were $290, labor was 8 weeks (had to turn the birch logs into lumber, dry it in the loft for a year, plane, tongue and groove it, put it down, sand it, finish it). We're not just DYI, we are start with the raw ingredients and go from there.
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Old 06-07-2012, 12:43 PM   #13
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Working full time and being self-employed, it's very difficult to finish a large project in a timely manner. A friend helped me demolish a large, termite infested, 2,500 sq/ft hillside deck in the summer of 2009 and I've been slowly re-building the deck, but on a smaller scale, entirely in concrete and brick this time, no wood. This project is about three quarters of the way finished now. Lucky for me I was able to get several dump truck loads of free fill dirt from a nearby townhome community building project.
The house also needs a new roof but that will be done in sections, over several dry months. I have no idea when I'll get to it. Wife's been nagging me about a new roof for the last 5 years. It's waaaay over due. Good thing we live in LA where we don't get much rain.
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Old 06-07-2012, 12:46 PM   #14
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Working full time and being self-employed, it's very difficult to finish a large project in a timely manner. A friend helped me demolish a large, termite infested, 2,500 sq/ft hillside deck in the summer of 2009 and I've been slowly re-building the deck, but on a smaller scale, entirely in concrete and brick this time, no wood. This project is about three quarters of the way finished now. Lucky for me I was able to get several dump truck loads of free fill dirt from a nearby townhome community building project.
The house also needs a new roof but that will be done in sections, over several dry months. I have no idea when I'll get to it. Wife's been nagging me about a new roof for the last 5 years.
I hear you--there are baseboards to put on, the deck to do (the cedar boards are ready--the time to do it is not), the floor to finish, and then there are those furniture-refinishing projects. We go to a lot of auctions. Auctions = more projects.
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Old 06-07-2012, 01:06 PM   #15
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Is it backed by some sort of brackets intended to be used for mounting?

I interpret "not screw it up" as not wanting it to fall off the wall and get ruined. IMO you should use expansion anchors, available in a huge variety at HD and other hardware stores. You select type and size depending on weight of hanging and method of attachment. Assuming 20-30 pounds perhaps two anchors. If you don't have the skills then get somebody to do the job for you.

(You probably have wallboard over studs for your wall. For the anchors you drill a hole--some have sharp points and you pound them in without needing a hole--then they expand as they are tightened down. Some day when they are not needed they are easy to remove and fill over with spackle and paint, wall is then good as new.)
I think that's the way to go. Thank you, Greg, and for all the tips.

P.S. In the past, I bought the 3M (Command?) peel and stick hooks, but they didn't stick & fell off the wall before I could hang some light-weight mirrors & pics.
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Old 06-07-2012, 01:20 PM   #16
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Re candles...
I have a plethora of candleholders in almost every room. I was happy to come across "flameless" candles & "flameless" tealight candles. (I put some in the fireplace, as well.) Some are on timers. That way, you don't have to worry about falling asleep, & burning down the house.
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Old 06-08-2012, 08:57 PM   #17
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i just finished redoing my living room. painted one wall yellow, rest of walls are white. hung new pictures , a city somewhere, all done in bright reds, yellows and oranges on a dark blue background.hung this on the yellow wall. bought a metal sculpture for one wall, redid a chair, and cushion for another chair. new padded seat cushion for a bench that i just love pulled bits and things in yellow from rest of house. it is bright and cheery and the room looks larger.

sewing room is next and what a job that will be. it is sure a jumble, i can never find what i need. anyway diy is fine, and it just takes time and (hopefully not to much money.

forgot, made new kitchen curtains.
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:01 PM   #18
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Which way should the fan be spinning in the summer?
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:15 PM   #19
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Which way should the fan be spinning in the summer?
That would depend whether you're in the northern or southern hemisphere.

Ceiling fans in general should direct air straight down during the warmer months and reverse during the winter.
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:37 PM   #20
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Done painting :)

6-8 hours of painting
4 coats of white
3 coats of purple
A sprained thumb
A couple dog paws around the house, in paint of course
A Barney impersonation

AND a partridge in a pear tree



Before :


After :
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