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Old 08-19-2012, 01:20 PM   #41
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I remember a Dr. Oz show where he recommended triple antibiotic cream and a bandaid, the key being keeping the owie moist and not forming a scab. I admit I usually go with letting a wound form a scab.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:15 PM   #42
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Keeping the wound moist and covered promotes healing. It will heal more quickly and scar less if this is done. Nature's bandaid often leaves scars. We heal from the inside out.

I've used all types of antiseptic, but honestly soap and water is the best thing. We often use peroxide (even though we are now told not to) on things like road rash (in ball games) in order to stop the oozing quickly and get the kids back in the game.
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Old 08-19-2012, 02:48 PM   #43
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Late last summer, I had many weeks of trials and tribulations tending to a wound in the calf area of my wife's leg. The wound was the result of a biopsy sample performed by a plastic surgeon.
The care instructions from the surgeon included cleansing three times per day. with a light saline solution, application of an antibiotic salve (mupirocin 2%), prevention of scab formation and the optional use of a dressing. After about 2 weeks of no apparent healing, continued inflammation, and oozing; I switched to cleansing with hydrogen peroxide and noted a slight improvement with respect to oozing and inflammation, but after an additional two weeks did not detect any discernible healing.
After the above described four weeks, it was time to buy another 22 g of Mupirocin. Because it appeared that the hydrogen peroxide was hampering tissue regeneration, over my wife's objections, I discontinued the use of peroxide and used the salve for cleansing the wound. After about a week the area of the wound started to shrink as healthy tissue began to grow around the edges of the wound.
The ~2" X 1" wound was finally fully healed about three months after the date of the surgery.
The Mupirocin (manufactured in India) was supposed to show a 'clinical response' within one week.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:48 PM   #44
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I healed Shrek's inch and a half deep x 8 inches long surgical wound with saline and gauze, keeping it moist, in about three weeks at home. It's also important to increase protein and vitamin E when you have a wound that is tough to heal.

I've been healing wounds for almost thirteen years now...
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:07 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I healed Shrek's inch and a half deep x 8 inches long surgical wound with saline and gauze, keeping it moist, in about three weeks at home. It's also important to increase protein and vitamin E when you have a wound that is tough to heal.

I've been healing wounds for almost thirteen years now...
Thanks for the feedback. Seems that clean deep wounds can heal better than larger surface area wounds, particularly in the leg area if there are some circulatory problems. My wife's adventure with hot coffee on her upper leg was another trying adventure.
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:24 PM   #46
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For a large area and shallow wound I would use the same technique. Cleanse with saline, moisten gauze with saline and wring out almost dry, cover just the wound with the moist gauze so the surrounding skin does not stay wet. Cover with dry gauze and paper tape. Change twice a day.

If the gauze is too wet, it will not wick away the drainage from the wound and allow it to just sit and get infectious. When the dressing comes off, the "moist" gauze should have all the drainage and the wound should be nice and pink/red. I understand the healing problems of areas with poor circulation. Been taking care of venous stasis ulcers for a long time.
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:05 PM   #47
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If you can believe the claims, cuts covered with a band-aid heal faster than cuts left uncovered. Similar claim for Neosporin - cuts heal faster when this is used.

I believe the band-aid claim as I have observed the difference myself in a decidedly non-scientific, uncontrolled study. I don't use antiseptics so can't speak to that claim.
My experience is exactly the opposite. My cuts heal more quickly dry and exposed to air, once an initial bleeding, clotting and scab forming has taken place.

I've also observed that cuts heal more quickly when they are allowed to dry and form a scab. Application of a salve keeps the wound moist and scab formation is delayed. However there are good reasons to apply an antiseptic or antibiotic salve, when infection is a concern.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I remember a Dr. Oz show where he recommended triple antibiotic cream and a bandaid, the key being keeping the owie moist and not forming a scab. I admit I usually go with letting a wound form a scab.
Oddly, I have little faith in the advice of Dr. Oz.


To be clear, my comments refer to minor wounds, what we sometimes call "owies." More severe wounds require different treatment than superficial wounds.

For example, my second cut has almost healed, near 99%. It was the less consequential of the two.

My more serious cut (treated with hydrogen peroxide) bled out under the Band-Aid and kept itself fairly moist. Today I scrubbed off the excess blood (on the skin around the wound) and now I observe an exposed clot that has not formed a scab. I'm drying it out in air right now but will apply a Band-Aid before bedtime to keep the wound clean, and to keep debris out of the wound.

I think the best practice for superficial wounds is to clean them off with an antiseptic and then apply a Band-Aid. Once a scab has formed I would just leave it exposed and allow it to heal. If I feel there is substantial potential for accidentally re-injuring the scab then I would protect it with a Band-Aid.

Again, nothing I'm referring to has anything to do with anything other than superficial, small wounds.

I think isopropanol (IPA) is the way to go for these small injuries.
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:50 PM   #48
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After treating Isabelle's bites, some of which were tears to the bone, with saline (yes, drains were put in, but 4 days after the incident), I'm a believer in saline. (Of course the first round of treatment was at 1:00 a.m. and I was in a panic). We would flush the wounds daily with saline, pack with sugar, wrap with gauze, and then cover with vet wrap 2x/day. The wounds healed nicely and she didn't need to be on antibiotics.
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:29 AM   #49
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My brother in law is recovering from a horrible surgical infection, and both the wound care doc and the infectious disease doc said NO PEROXIDE, not ever, never on wounds. Peroxide destroys tissue and interferes with healing.

My minor wound care regime is soap and water, then neosporin and a bandage.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:32 PM   #50
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I have the recipes for both Saline and Dakin's solution If anyone is interested. Dakin's is used much more sparingly, only for infected wounds and it is stopped when the infection is gone.

Being able to make my own saline saved Medicare $50 x 3...
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