"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-20-2012, 01:56 PM   #51
Sous Chef
 
Sprout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Usa, Michigan
Posts: 558
When I was in college we talked a fair amount about the moist vs. dry healing debate. Even the medical field can't agree on which is better. I think the reason they can't get a solid answer from research is pretty obvious. Every wound is different and every person's body heals just a little differently. There are definitely certain treatments for certain types of wounds, but for little things it varies from person to person and injury to injury. The only hard-fast rules we learned were, like mentioned above, washing the wound with mild soap and clean water or with saline is the number one with any injury, heat is best to draw out infection, and never use peroxide on an open wound.

Personally, whether or not I use a bandaid or antibiotic ointment/tea tree oil/etc largely depends on where the cut is. If it's in an area that gets a lot of air (a natural bacteria killer) and it's not actively bleeding, I usually put nothing on it. I'll throw a bandaid on anything on my hands if I have to work (as it's required) and if it's fairly deep I'll put some ointment or tea tree oil on it while the bandage is on. At home I leave it exposed. If I get a cut on my foot I typically do ointment and a bandage, since feet come into contact with a lot of bacteria but aren't as frequently and easily washed as hands. The only time I use any kind of disinfectant is if I know there is infection present. With something like a hangnail I'll soak in hot water with betadine or iodine. For an ingrown hair I use a hot, moist washcloth and once it's open, maybe some betadine or tea tree oil followed by antibiotic ointment and a bandaid. I never use alcohol on myself/kids/etc. because frankly, it hurts, and if it's any worse than what I've mentioned above, I'm going to a doctor.
__________________

__________________
Always try to bring a spare set of clothing when you dream about going to work or school. That way, if you encounter someone having that dream where they show up in their underwear, you'll be their hero.
Sprout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 02:01 PM   #52
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
I've used all types of antiseptic, but honestly soap and water is the best thing.
+1
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 06:44 PM   #53
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Greg, you seem to be equating formation of a scab with healing. That is not necessarily true. As I said, healing occurs from the inside out. If you want to minimize scarring moist and covered is better. Read the lovely PF's comments, not TOO wet, but moist enough to promote drainage.

How we got here from antiseptics is kinda funky.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 07:28 PM   #54
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,017
Diabetics have entirely different problems with healing. They take longer to heal, and usually have circulatory problems also. Without the nutrients provided by the blood supply, there can be no healing. And the baby toe is the last place for the blood to flow to. It is also the most difficult place to put a bandaid on. That is why it is so important for diabetics to get their feet checked regularly.

I had a hematoma break. That thing would just not stop bleeding. By the time I got it under control, I had a miniscule hole that formed a scab the size of a large grain of ground pepper. That was three weeks ago. The scab is still there, but smaller. I hope it drops off soon. It can't get any smaller.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 08:21 PM   #55
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
My brother in law is recovering from a horrible surgical infection, and both the wound care doc and the infectious disease doc said NO PEROXIDE, not ever, never on wounds. Peroxide destroys tissue and interferes with healing.
From what I've read online and from comments in this topic I think I'm done with hydrogen peroxide.

Are there any other uses for it? Should I just throw it out?
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 08:23 PM   #56
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks

From what I've read online and from comments in this topic I think I'm done with hydrogen peroxide.

Are there any other uses for it? Should I just throw it out?
It's great for taking out bloodstains, and is the main ingredient in Oxyclean. I wouldn't throw it out, just wouldn't use it on wounds. Carpets, sheets, clothing, yes.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 09:30 PM   #57
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
It's great for taking out bloodstains, and is the main ingredient in Oxyclean. I wouldn't throw it out, just wouldn't use it on wounds. Carpets, sheets, clothing, yes.
I once had two female dogs that got in a fight as they came in the door. It wasn't really a fight, it was more a spat, but, the one dog nicked the other dog's facial artery. There was blood every where. I loaded the bleeding dog into the van, drove to the vet clinic, realized she didn't have a collar on, slipped one on her (as she leaned on my chest). I walked into the clinic with a mostly white dog covered with blood and blood all over me. Hydrogen peroxide works great to get blood out when it is fresh. Did I mention the van looked as if I had butchered an animal in it? Six hours, 20 bottles of hydrogen peroxide and 6 cans of plain white shaving cream later, you'd have thought the van was brand new. Plain white shaving cream + hydrogen peroxide works great to get fresh blood stains out of upholstery and carpet. Oh--the gal only needed on stitch.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 09:45 PM   #58
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sprout View Post
When I was in college we talked a fair amount about the moist vs. dry healing debate. Even the medical field can't agree on which is better. I think the reason they can't get a solid answer from research is pretty obvious. Every wound is different and every person's body heals just a little differently. There are definitely certain treatments for certain types of wounds, but for little things it varies from person to person and injury to injury.
I guess I can speak only for myself. My experience is that small wounds like cuts and scrapes heal more quickly if I just get out of the way. Once a scab has formed I've found that my fastest healing relies on keeping the scab on and not scraping it until it falls off naturally Once that happens the healing is almost complete.

My only question is regarding clearing the wound of pathogens before the bandage goes on. (1) soap and water, (2) an antiseptic such as IPA, (3) something else.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 09:53 PM   #59
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
Greg, you seem to be equating formation of a scab with healing. That is not necessarily true. As I said, healing occurs from the inside out. If you want to minimize scarring moist and covered is better. Read the lovely PF's comments, not TOO wet, but moist enough to promote drainage.

How we got here from antiseptics is kinda funky.
I'm just relating my own personal experience, and I'm referring to cuts that are not cosmetic, like on the face. At some point in life you've cut almost everything that can be cut and whatever scars they are, that's what it is.

I figured a discussion of antiseptics would end exactly here. I wanted to know the best thing I could do for minor cuts.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 10:15 PM   #60
Sous Chef
 
Sprout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Usa, Michigan
Posts: 558
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I once had two female dogs that got in a fight as they came in the door. It wasn't really a fight, it was more a spat, but, the one dog nicked the other dog's facial artery. There was blood every where. I loaded the bleeding dog into the van, drove to the vet clinic, realized she didn't have a collar on, slipped one on her (as she leaned on my chest). I walked into the clinic with a mostly white dog covered with blood and blood all over me. Hydrogen peroxide works great to get blood out when it is fresh. Did I mention the van looked as if I had butchered an animal in it? Six hours, 20 bottles of hydrogen peroxide and 6 cans of plain white shaving cream later, you'd have thought the van was brand new. Plain white shaving cream + hydrogen peroxide works great to get fresh blood stains out of upholstery and carpet. Oh--the gal only needed on stitch.
Bravo to you for keeping a cool head! All that blood must have been scary!
__________________

__________________
Always try to bring a spare set of clothing when you dream about going to work or school. That way, if you encounter someone having that dream where they show up in their underwear, you'll be their hero.
Sprout is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.