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Old 03-24-2006, 04:47 PM   #51
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camping, walking... I'd get a German Shepherd Dog or a mix of one. Highline hips if possible. I'm not a big phan of the lowline dogs, though a good floating trot is beautiful in action. GSDs are incredible dogs.
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Old 03-24-2006, 05:23 PM   #52
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If this guy is still up for adoption when I get back from funeral proceedings next week in Key Largo I may take a trip to Maryland. He sounds like a *perfect* dog for us. I love him already.
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Old 03-24-2006, 06:45 PM   #53
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Wow he's a beautiful Shep. I'd love for you to see my dad's. Baron's nickname isn't " The moose " for nothing.
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Old 03-25-2006, 10:00 AM   #54
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To be honest German Shepards, Dobermans, Pit Bulls and Rotweillers all intimidate me. I don't know why but they scare me.
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Old 03-25-2006, 10:26 AM   #55
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I love dogs, and get along with all kinds, but I don't trust German Shepherds. They have a tendancy to turn on their owners. My youngest daughter, when she was 9 years old, was bitten in the mouth by a neighbors shepherd that was on a leash. The neighbor said she hadn't done anything at all to antagonize the dog.
I've only been bitten by a dog once, and it was when I was delivering flowers. The shepherd didn't even bark at me, just sneaked up from behind and bit my calf. Fortunately, I had on jeans and knee-high boots, so he didn't break the skin. I turned around and gave him a good chewing out, and he slunk off to his doghouse.
My husband's aunt raised shepherds, and even she had one of her own dogs turn on her, and it chewed her up pretty good.
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Old 03-25-2006, 10:30 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SizzlininIN
To be honest German Shepards, Dobermans, Pit Bulls and Rotweillers all intimidate me. I don't know why but they scare me.
Probably because they are really muscle dogs and are used mainly for protection. They are depicted the same in movies, because they can intimedate any prowlers. BUT, everyone of them can be sweet dogs given the chance. I wouldn't risk it around small kids though.
MIL had a Rott that was just sweet as can be. She adopted my oldest son the day we brought him home, we were living with them at the time.
NOONE got near his bassinet without her standing there and watching every move you made. If he cried, she would come running and get your attention until you went to him. We had to put her outside when my SIL held him, she wouldn't let her near him. About a year later, SIL was diagnosed as Manic Depressive. I think she could sence that something wasn't right and didn't want SIL holding my son. She lived until my son was 10. She stuck near him every visit we made. She wasn't like that with my youngest either.
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Old 03-25-2006, 10:48 AM   #57
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I don't think they created those Carl books for no reason...



Another breed of dog that their appearance kinda fools many people is Bulldog... every bulldog I have known or came across was such a sweetpea bursting with affections.
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Old 03-25-2006, 12:35 PM   #58
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GSDs do *not* have a tendency to turn on their owners in my experience. That's pure hyperbole, IMHO. I have never known one to turn. I *have* known them to be protective of their owners. That's what they were bred for.

You were delivering flowers and the dog saw you as a threat. The neighbor's kid was not part of the family and the dog may have perceived it as a threat. Your aunt-in-law's dog would be an anomaly if it's the *only* one that attacked her. She breeds them and only *one* has ever turned on her? That's pretty good odds, considering *any* dog (or person for that matter) can be "not right" in the head. My schnauzer/terrier isn't the most stable dog, by a long shot.

Ask a K9 cop if his GSD has turned on him. I bet you'll get a "negative."

The most common dog for bites? Chihuahuas. IIRC, Poodles are not far behind. Corgis can be known to nip at heels. It's an instinct.
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Old 03-25-2006, 01:55 PM   #59
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It is no secret that I am partial to labs- especially yellows but, I have been around dogs my whole life and there are many wonderful breeds- pedigree and mixes out there.Growing up we had Boston terriers and they were very calm and loyal.My uncle gave us one(Toro) and then my mother fell in love with another one and brought her(Pepper) home.They were both quiet and clean as well as obiedient.My grandparents had a beautiful German Shepard (Clovia). As a small child I could walk Clovia around my grandmother's house by holding a biscuit in my hand and she held on to it with her teeth.We left a trail of drool and my Grandmother hated when I did this but,Clovia never once tried to grab the whole biscuit from my hand and she actually would expect this when she saw me.Another Aunt had a doxie named Ginger who really just sat around and got fed most of the time but, she barked non-stop. My other Aunt's teacup poodle Penny-also a barker but, also a very loving dog as she welcomed everyone who came in with trampoline high jumps and later face loads of kisses when you sat down.Sadie the cockerspaniel loved to be around kids-she would play with us non-stop and sit with us when we were watching tv.Ralphie a cocker-irish setter mix was alot like Sadie but, probably the most intellegent dog I have ever known.He would retrieve anything and even knew how to turn the tv on and off when asked.Now I had Muttley -who was a real heinz 57 dog(He looked more Holstein cow than dog) and friendly to a point- he hated other male dogs and he was VERY protective of me.If anyone including my father or my now husband then boyfriend raised their voice to me the hair would stand up on his back and he would growl.He was not great around kids until I had ours and then he was very protective of them. Jellibean was a collie- lab mix who looked more like a collie.She was much like my Angel is now and at times I think she helped me find Angel from the "other side".All in all I think one important factor in getting ANY dog is how much time you're willing to work/train the dog and what the personality of the family is will strongly influence the temperment of the dog- I've seen it soooo many times when a going 90 miles an hour family has a hyper dog and they blame the dog as being the neurotic one- you know the"THis breed isn't supposed to be like this..."Well a dog will take on the general dynamics of the family and an untrained dog will be just that- they can't train themselves and be expected to be a certain way because that is what some book said.When we got Angel Jimmy brought the book Dogs for Dummies- when people ask how it worked I would say- You know Angel is so smart it only took her two weeks to read it.Actually it's got great tips that were very helpful.Dogs can be a God send but, they do need love and nurturing and training and YEARS of care.So lots of luck to you in finding your new family member and I wish you years and years of health and happiness together.Love and energy, Vicki
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Old 03-25-2006, 04:09 PM   #60
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After working for a vet for a year, and my sister for well over a decade, those "scary" breed dogs are often scary and "bad" because they attract very bad owners. I won't get into the 'born bad' argument, although remember that most pure breeds were actually bred for certain characteristics. Most people I ran into who went for the "scary" breeds wanted them to scare people with. The worst case of cruelty I ran into was done to a rottweiler. Many of these dogs get staked out in the yard with a bowl of water and one of food, and just left there all day, ostsensibly to guard the house. That bowl of water gets kicked over early in the day, too bad for fido. This in the Florida and Hawaii heat. Lots of people get them to scare off cops in case of a drug bust. Needless to say this is absolutely NOT the dogs' fault; that would turn me mean for sure! I know people who love these breeds and have gentle pets. But watch out for the real reason that animal is in the pound. I've also known a lot of these breeds to wind up in the pound because Daddy/Boyfriend was discipllning a child that dog was trained to protect. It doesn't take a genious to figure out where that went.

As everyone said, labs, retrievers and boxers have reps for being great with kids -- but most are not small. Not only do terriers tend to "yappiness" but remember hounds are bread to howl and can keep it up 24/7, even in a case I ran into, a basset mix, in his sleep. Makes terrier yapping seem mild! Your neighbors would probably prefer the yapping to that constant baying.

When you decide on a breed, consider contacting a rescue society. And I agree w/everyone that a little mutt in the mix helps smooth out the negative tendencies of the breed.

I like short hair, ears, and tails for a kids' first dog. No matter how kind you train your kids to be with dogs, especially young kids, those wind up being pulled.

In the terrier category, the West Highland and Scotties seem to be the least yappy and most mellow. I have Jack Russell Mutts, and when we bred ours (upon request)(I wouldn't do it again) I specifically told all the senior citizens and those with babies "NO". Too much energy. The people who bought them had older kids or were childless couples.

I don't mean to insult anyone, but remember if you buy one of the most intelligent breeds that (a) you have to be smarter than the dog and (b) you need lots of time to train the dog and put that intelligence to work for good. If not, it WILL get bored and get in trouble every time you aren't looking, finding imaginative ways to destroy your home. I knew of an Australian Shepherd who could get past all the childproofing in the house when everyone was at work. Nothing was safe from chewing, eating, etc.
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