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Old 02-25-2018, 03:34 PM   #21
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You're exactly spot on.

The dry CI (and Carbon steel) do show rust very quickly.

It's easy to rinse away - and the sprayed oil is then a buffer. I had severe iron deficiency a couple of years ago so I just take fewer tablets . But, seriously, the rinsing is effective.

I started to look at this as I was concerned with the black specks often floating around. And posts - eg on Chowhound - had folks that were imagining the CI being invaded by whatever material deep into the vessel. I also wished that it would be OK to give CI a good whiz in the dishwasher sometime.

I am glad that I went ahead with the experiments - sure has made my obsession with CI and CS much easier! And gone are the black mystery specks - they surely had no chemical relatives in the original flax and rapeseed oils.
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Old 02-25-2018, 03:35 PM   #22
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For one thing there are many types of cast iron. I was a machinist for 33 years, and worked for the first 12 years in a plant which had a plate fabrication shop, a machine shop, and a foundry capable of pouring 50+ ton castings (we built large machinery for the mining, smelting, nuclear, and sugar beet refining industries). We poured our own castings, and made parts from many types of iron - gray iron with no additives, and several grades of mehanite which had varying amounts of scrap steel and chemicals added to the pot to get different properties.

Gray iron was only used rarely because it's very brittle and not much good for most mechanical applications. Some of the mehanite parts were polished to a high luster on bearing surfaces and there was no discernible porosity.

All that said, I have no idea what grade of cast iron goes into cookware, but once it's been seasoned, any possible pores in the metal should be sealed over. There certainly isn't any health risk from anything caught in the pores. Even if a pan is abused, once it's been reseasoned, it's good. Cooking it in a 500° F oven for an hour will kill any biological nasties, and seasoning seals off the iron itself. I can't believe that cookware would be made with any chemicals which would leave a toxic residue.
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Old 02-25-2018, 03:40 PM   #23
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CD. I wouldn’t expect someone to come to DC looking for an answer to a technical photography question. Would you?
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Old 02-25-2018, 03:48 PM   #24
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Rick -

Thanks input. My chemical knowledge says that intermolecular space is not 'accessible' but was still NOT SURE and thus my original question. You say that there are many 'ingredients' in the formulation of the material - but I could believe all roads are closed after casting. forging, etc. Only the surface has openings and they don't go beyond a mm or two - and can be washed away very easily.
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Old 02-25-2018, 03:55 PM   #25
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and anything in those pores can be brushed and washed away very easily.
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Old 02-25-2018, 04:11 PM   #26
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This may or may not be related but I'm sure I'm getting 'particles' on my food every time I use the outdoor grill. My filthy cast iron grates are simply brushed clean over direct heat before every use.
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Old 02-25-2018, 04:50 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodfood View Post
It looks like I've tempted 'know nothings' from the 'Dotard Drumpf' crew - "I don't have to know nuttin." The language also matches.

Cleaning, 'seasoning' and a lot of other BS is because there is some thought 'out there' that CI 'phenomena' extend beyond a few millimeters - THEY DON'T!
Do they have jokes where you're from? I was only goofing around, along the way you posted your question.

I think you answered your own question, although I'm not sure. I would imagine that you'd have to heat metal way beyond cooking temps to be able to get molecules of food in between the molcules of the metal. And at that point, the food wouldn't be in its initial state either.

I have a question for you. If you sat on a lump of coal, would you have a diamond in your ass in 2 weeks?
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:30 PM   #28
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CD. I wouldn’t expect someone to come to DC looking for an answer to a technical photography question. Would you?
If it was a technical food photography question, yes. The OP is asking a cast-iron cookware question. Seems okay for a cooking forum, to me.

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Old 02-25-2018, 11:42 PM   #29
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If it was a technical food photography question, yes. The OP is asking a cast-iron cookware question. Seems okay for a cooking forum, to me.



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I disagree. If I had a technical food photography question, I’d go to a photographer, not a chef.
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Old 02-26-2018, 01:41 AM   #30
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Buck --

I agree - I thought the many on Chowhound suggesting that 'stuff' could get in between the molecules - and thus using any detergent would ruin your CI . were 'pulling legs.' And they were always talking about pores IN the CI.

Unfortunately, they were more than serious.
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