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Old 10-12-2012, 09:20 PM   #131
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Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
It seems that CI pans all have an individual personality.

I now have five by four makers and they all do a fine job but the 6 inch Griswold is as slippery as any modern nonstick pan, the two oldest with no markings come in second and the two Wagner's come in third.

I am curious if all Griswold's are super slippery or if I just got lucky on this little gem!
My ten inch Griswold is very slippery as well. But my six inch pan, like yours is ridiculous. It's the slipperiest pan I own, including my non-stick pancake griddle.

My other pans resist sticking really well, even the Stainless steel pan. I just heat it before adding a thin coat of oil. When I place food it it, even bacon, the food literally slides across the pan If I tilt it. Ya just have to understand your pans.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:55 AM   #132
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Chief's Tip Of The Day:

To familiarize yourself with herbs and spices, practice this exercise frequently. Walk to your spice rack, pantry, or spice drawer, close your eyes, and grab a container, any container. Open the lid and smell the contents. Try to identify the ingredients without opening your eyes. Before long, you will be able to distinguish the aromas, and correctly identify them.

When you have mastered this ability, do it every now and again, just to keep the knowledge fresh in your mind.

The skill will enable you to pick out the herbs and spices in foods from restaurants, or a friend's home, or allow you to play with the flavors in your mind before actually adding them to your own food creations. You will then begin to develop the intuition to create, or recreate foods that you enjoy.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
He did this to us when we were kids. "Close your eyes. What's this one? Keep 'em closed!" No wonder I feel anxiety whenever I can't identify a smell...
JK, I actually though that game was pretty cool when I was a kid. (Oh, you though I was kidding about him doing this to us? Nope. Just about feeling anxiety over it.)
My husband, however, plays this game where he gets on Youtube or a playlist on the computer and fires song after song at me and asks "Who's this? What song is this?" I guess it's true what they say about daughters marrying their fathers. The only difference is their weapon of choice. Dad used spices to educate us, DH uses obscure music.
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Old 10-14-2012, 01:54 AM   #133
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I hate when someone does that to me. You want to educate? Get a classroom. And don't ask me to do mental math. If I am in a good mood, I will just say, "I don't know." If not, then you get a nasty answer. I make no bones about it. Math is not my forte`. Geography and history are. I don't know music from the 70's, 80's or any day forward. I was too busy raising kids to pay attention. During my working days, the only time I had the radio on was first thing in the morning to listen to the weather.
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:36 AM   #134
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He did this to us when we were kids. "Close your eyes. What's this one? Keep 'em closed!" No wonder I feel anxiety whenever I can't identify a smell...
JK, I actually though that game was pretty cool when I was a kid. (Oh, you though I was kidding about him doing this to us? Nope. Just about feeling anxiety over it.)
My husband, however, plays this game where he gets on Youtube or a playlist on the computer and fires song after song at me and asks "Who's this? What song is this?" I guess it's true what they say about daughters marrying their fathers. The only difference is their weapon of choice. Dad used spices to educate us, DH uses obscure music.
When I was five, my father bought me water color paints--red, blue, yellow, burnt umber, sienna, china white, and a "blue" black. He would take the dog for a walk and bring things back--red maple leaves in the fall, pasque flowers in the spring, asparagus. Then he would challenge me to match the color using my paints. Supposedly, the average person's color memory is 30 minutes. I bought linen thread to match the paint I used in the living room (I was in California). When I got home, the thread was a perfect match. I never did get around to weaving the curtain fabric...and I've repainted the living room several times since then. But, it did prove that my color memory is well trained. I drive the clerks in the paint department crazy...I'd like this color at 1/2 the concentration and with 3% more of the blue/black/yellow...My brother loves it when I do that to match a paint chip to a color in a piece of fabric. I don't recommend doing that--you have to buy a gallon and if your color skills aren't great, you're stuck with paint that isn't quite what you want. It took two tries to get the color I wanted for the bedroom. I used the rejected can as primer.
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Old 10-20-2012, 06:25 PM   #135
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Chief's Tip of the Day

To remove the core from a heat of iceberg lettuce, Turn the head so that the heel (where the stem attached) is pointing upward. Place the lettuce head onto a sturdy table, or counter in that position. Now, give that lettuce a severe blow, right on the heel, with the heel of your hand. Grab the remaining stem, five a light twist, and pull it cleanly from the head.

2nd tip of the day;

No Margarette, you can't spread toe-jam, on you little brother's toast. I don't care if it's call jam, and you uncle Bill says it smells just like his favorite cheese.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:42 PM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Chief's Tip of the Day

To remove the core from a heat of iceberg lettuce, Turn the head so that the heel (where the stem attached) is pointing upward. Place the lettuce head onto a sturdy table, or counter in that position. Now, give that lettuce a severe blow, right on the heel, with the heel of your hand. Grab the remaining stem, five a light twist, and pull it cleanly from the head.

2nd tip of the day;

No Margarette, you can't spread toe-jam, on you little brother's toast. I don't care if it's call jam, and you uncle Bill says it smells just like his favorite cheese.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Another way to remove the stem from iceburg lettuce is to grab the head in your hand and WHACK the stem on a counter. When my parents owned a restaurant, I cleaned a lot of lettuce. The stem will pop right out. The same is true if you want to get the core out of cauliflower.

When dicing/cutting sweet peppers, cut the stem and heel off, remove core, slit, lay it out, skinside down, and slice from the inside. It cuts better and is easier to cut this way.
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Old 10-20-2012, 10:05 PM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North
Chief's Tip of the Day

To remove the core from a heat of iceberg lettuce, Turn the head so that the heel (where the stem attached) is pointing upward. Place the lettuce head onto a sturdy table, or counter in that position. Now, give that lettuce a severe blow, right on the heel, with the heel of your hand. Grab the remaining stem, five a light twist, and pull it cleanly from the head.

2nd tip of the day;

No Margarette, you can't spread toe-jam, on you little brother's toast. I don't care if it's call jam, and you uncle Bill says it smells just like his favorite cheese.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Your iceberg lettuce tip is one I have known all my life. I just recently learned that everyone didn't know that trick. That is just how mom taught us. :)
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Old 10-21-2012, 01:11 AM   #138
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Another way to remove the stem from iceburg lettuce is to grab the head in your hand and WHACK the stem on a counter. When my parents owned a restaurant, I cleaned a lot of lettuce. The stem will pop right out. The same is true if you want to get the core out of cauliflower.

When dicing/cutting sweet peppers, cut the stem and heel off, remove core, slit, lay it out, skinside down, and slice from the inside. It cuts better and is easier to cut this way.
I core my lettuce the same as you. Why hurt my hand when I can let the counter take the abuse? I didn't know about the cauliflower.

I have always cut around the stem and twisted the seed pod out. The majority of the seeds stay intact when removing. Then I slit it to remove the white on the veins. Continue with skin side down. Like you do.
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Old 10-21-2012, 01:59 AM   #139
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I enjoy giving the lettuce head a whack with my hand. It keeps my striking skills from martial arts, intact. I know it sounds funny, but it's true. I've never had to strike someone, but I do know that I can put my hand through pine boards, drywall, and knock a 200 lb. man back about four feet with an open hand, heel strike. With a two hand strike, well, I'm just going to quit now. This is about taking the core out of iceberg lettuce.

Oh, don't try and break a 3 X 4 piece of 3/4 inch plywood with a fist strike. I didn't break any body parts with that one. The guy holding the plywood goaded me into hitting it. I knew that he couldn't hold it sturdy enough, and it, and he would move. He was knocked back about three feet. I cracked the plywood, and my knuckles hurt for about a half hour. The guy had sore wrists, and never knew that I had felt any pain. The sides of 69 Dodge vans don't give much either. I won't say who made me mad enough to hit my van. But I still have never punched or hit another human being in anger. And I'm happy about that.

Oh, I was younger then. That's my excuse for being dumb.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-29-2012, 11:36 AM   #140
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Chief's Tip of the Day

Whip in three tbs. milk into your favorite buttercream cake frosting to make it silky smooth, and light. But, it will be so soft that it won't hold a peak as well. It will be very soft, and will work well in a piping bag. But don't expect to make icing flowers with it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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