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Old 04-28-2014, 08:53 AM   #231
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That is a cool idea Aunt Bea. Crack a dozen into a boil-in bag. Chop when cool enough. Thinking...
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Old 04-28-2014, 10:25 AM   #232
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I saw this tip the other day: http://www.thekitchn.com/is-the-best...-kitchn-202778

The author said the eggs practically fall out of the shells
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:48 PM   #233
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I never mind peeling 2 or 3 eggs, but I've often wondered if anyone has a method for hard boiling a dozen or so eggs without the shell. My thought is sort of a boil in bag or poaching method. I think it would be great for egg salad, macaroni salad etc... I'm sure a method like this must be used in large kitchens, I've just never seen one for the home cook, any ideas?
There are poaching pan will cook up to 6 eggs at a time. With a large enough pot (think very wide), you can crack the eggs into hot, salted water. The water has to be between 180 and 200'. That way, the water won't be moving, and the individual eggs will remain intact. You can't stack them though, and it's best if the pot is seasoned as eggs will stick to the bottom, even in water. Remove with a spider, or slotted spoon.

Roast them until they are done, on a cookie sheet, in the shell of course.

Best method, boil per your favorite method, and give them to someone else to peel.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 05-11-2014, 03:24 PM   #234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I saw this tip the other day: Is the Best Way to Make Easy-to-Peel Eggs in the Pressure Cooker? Putting Tips to the Test in The Kitchn | The Kitchn

The author said the eggs practically fall out of the shells
I've been going to Laura Pazzaglia's HIP site ever since I got a pressure cooker. Sadly my PC has just one setting: 15lbs, so I couldn't do use her tip.
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Old 06-15-2014, 05:58 PM   #235
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Hi - I'm new here today and have just read this thread. Here are my tips that occur to me immediately.

Sage - was mentioned. Do you all know that the fresh sage leaves are delicious lightly fried in a little butter until crisp? Can serve as a garnish or eat as a treat!

Also, rubbing a fresh sage leaf over your teeth not only cleans them but leaves a delightful cleansing tang in the mouth.

Fresh Coconut Here's a good method for opening it and preserving the coconut water. You see the 3 holes at the top? I get a strong nail and hammer it into these
holes (nail need only go in halfway and nail removed to go on to next hole). Once all the holes are opened I leave the coconut, hole side down, over a jug for the water to collect in. Once drained, I place the coconut in a plastic bag and hammer it on the ground until it is broken into required pieces. Then I transfer the water into a shallow dish (large enough to keep the coconut pieces) and place the coconut pieces flesh side down into their water. Chill. When wanted, just take a piece out and deshell with a small sharp knife.

For a perfect soft boiled egg, i.e. with egg white that is not hard/rubbery - I coddle it. I pierce the egg at the widest top part (to release the air), then plunge it into boiling water (the air escapes and the egg will not crack), I lower the heat to medium and simmer it for 1 minute. Then leave off the heat for 4 minutes. Always just right - runny yolk and set, velvety egg white.

Roasting a Chicken - for the first 15 mins I turn the heat up to Mk 7 and place the chicken breast side down; this lets the juices run into the breast whilst crisping up
the underside of the chicken. Then I turn it the right way up and roast conventionally at Mk 4. A 3lb. chicken (1.3kg) takes 1 hour 15 mins all told

Chorizo easily goes tough/rubbery on a high heat. If added to a sauce/stew, simmer only...the lower the heat (and the longer the cooking time), the more succulent it becomes.
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Old 06-16-2014, 06:49 AM   #236
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Thanks, and welcome to DC.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-20-2014, 07:44 AM   #237
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Down the Wrong Hole

You know how honey has antiseptic properties, and is soothing to the throat? And you know how foods, especially liquids going down the wrong hole is so irritating? Well, last night, just before going to bed, I had a yearning for a tsp. of honey. Yep, you guessed it. It went a little bit down the wrong hole.

This wasn't irritating like water, or a little piece of food. This put me in distress for 6 to 7 minutes. Not life threatening, but very, very uncomfortable. It burns a little, and so irritates the top of the trachea that you can't help but cough, and cough, and cough. I was coughing for literally a half hour afterward, until I could no longer talk because the tissues swelled from coughing so much. Fortunately, I'm good at ignoring unpleasant sensations. That allowed me to fall asleep as I knew that the only way to get my throat back in order was to stop coughing.

This morning, 8 hours later, I have my voice back, but can still feel a tinge of swollen tissue, like the beginning of a sore throat. Hopefully, by the end of the day, I'll be fully back to normal.

Whooda thunk it, honey, that wonderfully tasty and soothing substance that's so good, in so many ways can be devastating to your throat, and in very short order. Do not let honey go down the wrong hole, ever!

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-06-2014, 10:51 AM   #238
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The Chief's Tip of the Day:

Overcooked meat is dry and tough. I once put a package of uncooked bratwurst into my slow cooker on its highest setting, immersed in water. It was my intention to cook it low and slow overnight, and have succulent, wonderful sausage the next day. Well, I forgot to turn it down. The sausage was as dry inside as sawdust, though it was completely immersed in broth.

Yesterday, I placed a rump roast into my pressure cooker, half filled with broth, onions, garlic, and seasoned with salt. I was watching a church program on TV that lasted about two hours.

You have to understand that I had never cooked a piece of protein in that vessel that wasn't super tender, and flavorful. I let that rump roast cook for an hour, put rice in the rice cooker, knowing it would take about 45 minutes to complete. When the rice cooker was done, I removed pressure from the PC, removed the roast and made a fabulous gravy from the broth. Unfortunately, that roast was dry and very tough. Fortunately, it had good flavor. I sliced it thin, against the grain, and served it with lots of gravy. It was edible, but not what I would call good.

Tip, no matter the technique you use, overcooking meat, that is, raising the meat tissue to a high temperature results in dry, tough meat, especially if it is very lean.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-06-2014, 11:40 AM   #239
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Low and Slow!
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Old 10-06-2014, 09:58 PM   #240
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Chief's Tip of the Day: Salvage Time

Ya know that roast I overcooked last night in the pressure cooker, dry and tough? I salvaged it tonight in that same pressure cooker. I made soup, and what a wonderful soup it turned out to be.
Ingredients:
1 cup left-over beef gravy, very rich and strong flavored gravy.
1 chopped carrot (rustic chop)
1 whole onion, halved, with each half quartered,
1 stalk of celery, sliced
1/2 lb. left-over roast beef, cubed (for me it was the dry, and tough rump roast)
1/4 cup uncooked rice
3 cups water
1/2 tsp granulated garlic powder

Throw everything into the pressure cooker. Bring to temperature and reduce heat until the regulator is barely dancing. Cook for ten minutes.

Eat, or store, or both. The flavor and texture were very good. The meat became tender, juicy, and absorbed more of that rich, beef flavor.

The tip - don't throw away overcooked, left-over meat. I can be used to make a very nice soup.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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