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Old 10-23-2014, 02:27 PM   #241
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Beef Broth

Chief's Tip of the Day:

Next time you braise a beef roast, and don't need the resultant broth, freeze it. The next time you braise beef, use the frozen broth as the brazing liquid. The meat is still the same as it was with the first roast, but the broth becomes intense, almost like reducing it by half concentrates the flavor. This broth can then be used top make Espagnole, or as the start of a demi-glace, or just ordinary gravy, or soup. You just need to add the other aromatics, and whatever your recipe requires.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:55 PM   #242
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That's like what I did today. I froze the braising liquid from the bone-in pork roast I made a few weeks ago and used it today in the 15 bean soup I'm making, using the bone from that roast.

It smells wonderful!
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Old 10-24-2014, 01:25 PM   #243
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i keep reading this thread as the sticky chief's tip of the day, or the chief's sticky tip of the day.

neither seem all that appealing.
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Old 10-24-2014, 03:15 PM   #244
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i keep reading this thread as the sticky chief's tip of the day, or the chief's sticky tip of the day.

neither seem all that appealing.
We could always call it - Bucky's Stinky Tip of the Day. Would that be better?

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-19-2014, 05:29 PM   #245
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Chief's Tip of the Day

Some of you may already know this. Most people I've met don't. When the weather gets very cold, an internal combustion engine turns over very slowly. I've heard that it's because the metal has contracted from the cold. I've heard that the oil gets thick and makes it hard for the engine to turn over. I've heard other theories as well.

People spend lots of money installing oil heaters, or block heaters on their engines to combat this. There is no need for these expensive solutions. Let me 'splain it to you.

When a lead-acid battery gets cold, it begins to lose its ability to deliver sufficient electrical current to turn over an engine. I worked for a battery distribution company for a while. We received an order for lead-acid batteries by the U.S. army that would fire up the tanks stationed in Alaska, during the winter. The owner had to explain the chemistry of the battery to the Army staff. At minus 50 degrees F., a lead acid battery will not deliver any energy. At 0 degrees, it will deliver a fraction of the energy that it pushes out at 70 degrees.

One night, during an especially cold spell, I failed to warm my car at midnight, and like most everyone in the neighborhood, the engine would not turn over at all. I removed the battery from the car and brought it into my warm house. After twenty minutes, the outside temperature had not changed at all. The battery, however, was warmed to room temperature, which is about 72 degrees in our home. I connected the battery cables and turned the key. The engine turned over like it was a warm August day. I spent most of the remainder of the morning jumping my neighbors cars.

A simple heating pad, placed over the battery on very cold days, or nights will insure that your car will start in the coldest weather. Just make sure that it will put out enough heat to combat the cold.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-20-2014, 05:06 AM   #246
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HA! I would have never thought of this! Thanks! I will be sharing with my FB friends. S/O and I do not have a car ATM but everyone I know does! And in Oklahoma it goes from HOT to FREEZING in a bat of an eye. It is like we have no Spring or Fall, just Summer and Winter.
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Old 11-21-2014, 11:57 AM   #247
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Chief's Tip of the Day:

Next time you braise a beef roast, and don't need the resultant broth, freeze it. The next time you braise beef, use the frozen broth as the brazing liquid. The meat is still the same as it was with the first roast, but the broth becomes intense, almost like reducing it by half concentrates the flavor. This broth can then be used top make Espagnole, or as the start of a demi-glace, or just ordinary gravy, or soup. You just need to add the other aromatics, and whatever your recipe requires.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
On a related note, Chief; would your delicious Umami Soup base/broth (in my freezer) be a good place to start a Thanksgiving gravy or should I stick to the turkey-flavored broth derived from simmering turkey parts? Use both, maybe? You wouldn't happen to have a recipe for really good gravy, would you? TIA.
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Old 11-21-2014, 12:11 PM   #248
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Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
On a related note, Chief; would your delicious Umami Soup base/broth (in my freezer) be a good place to start a Thanksgiving gravy or should I stick to the turkey-flavored broth derived from simmering turkey parts? Use both, maybe? You wouldn't happen to have a recipe for really good gravy, would you? TIA.
I would go with both. Turkey gravy, when made right, is practically a national treasure. On the other hand, the Umami Soup base could be thickened with a cornstarch slurry to make a wonderful gravy, especially when served with smashed spuds, or roast beef.

Chief's Tip of the Day: When making turkey, or any poultry broth, purchase some extra drumsticks. Remove the meat and chop it. Crack the larger bones. Brown the meat and bones in the bottom of a pressure cooker, or stock pot. Add chopped onion, and a stalk of celery. Add water to immerse the contents and rise above by two inches above. If using a PC, cover, bring to pressure, and cook for 40 minutes. If using a stock pot, simmer in the water for 1 and 1/2 hours. Remove the celery, season with salt and a little sage, maybe some ground pepper. Let it simmer for five minutes, then taste and correct the seasoning. Thicken with a roux, or corn starch slurry.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-21-2014, 02:05 PM   #249
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I would go with both. Turkey gravy, when made right, is practically a national treasure. On the other hand, the Umami Soup base could be thickened with a cornstarch slurry to make a wonderful gravy, especially when served with smashed spuds, or roast beef.

Chief's Tip of the Day: When making turkey, or any poultry broth, purchase some extra drumsticks. Remove the meat and chop it. Crack the larger bones. Brown the meat and bones in the bottom of a pressure cooker, or stock pot. Add chopped onion, and a stalk of celery. Add water to immerse the contents and rise above by two inches above. If using a PC, cover, bring to pressure, and cook for 40 minutes. If using a stock pot, simmer in the water for 1 and 1/2 hours. Remove the celery, season with salt and a little sage, maybe some ground pepper. Let it simmer for five minutes, then taste and correct the seasoning. Thicken with a roux, or corn starch slurry.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
And that's why you're the Chief! Thank you very much.
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Old 11-22-2014, 02:02 AM   #250
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I would go with both. Turkey gravy, when made right, is practically a national treasure. On the other hand, the Umami Soup base could be thickened with a cornstarch slurry to make a wonderful gravy, especially when served with smashed spuds, or roast beef.

Chief's Tip of the Day: When making turkey, or any poultry broth, purchase some extra drumsticks. Remove the meat and chop it. Crack the larger bones. Brown the meat and bones in the bottom of a pressure cooker, or stock pot. Add chopped onion, and a stalk of celery. Add water to immerse the contents and rise above by two inches above. If using a PC, cover, bring to pressure, and cook for 40 minutes. If using a stock pot, simmer in the water for 1 and 1/2 hours. Remove the celery, season with salt and a little sage, maybe some ground pepper. Let it simmer for five minutes, then taste and correct the seasoning. Thicken with a roux, or corn starch slurry.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Take your time and let that roux get nice and dark, a real "peanut butter" colored roux. It takes some time, but it will make you the gravy master of the universe. The roux can be made ahead and refrigerated or frozen to save some last minute hassle.

Peanut butter roux, it's not just for gumbo anymore!
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