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Old 08-23-2012, 12:08 AM   #71
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lol, i did something similar, chief.

i was visiting an ex-gf's family in bermuda years ago, and as a thank you for letting us stay in one of their cottages, i offered to make sunday gravy for the family.

after food shopping (with interesting results. bermuda is british and seems to have a different idea if what italian foods are as compared to italian americans) we went up to the big house to cook.

after starting the sauce, i noticed it was cloyingly swee and the herbs were way off. The family cook eventually told me that he "re-uses" old containers as he gets in new herbs and spices, feeling that the mix of aromas after a few varied contents were the secret to his dishes.

lunacy, i'll tell ya. but hey, who's gonna argue with an angry bermudian chef?
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:59 AM   #72
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Chief's Tip of the Day

To make perfect pie crusts, you don't have to go through all the trouble of icing the work surface, or chilling the dough. Also, you can work lard or shortening into the dough all day long without making it tough. However, the air temperature of the house must be below 80' F. so that the fat remains solid. And once you add ice water to the dough, you can no longer work the dough indefinitely. The water reacts with the flour proteins to develop gluten when the dough is worked. This is what will make the crust tough. When the ice water is added, you gently fold it into the dough just enough to moisten it evenly. This allows the starches to become sticky enough to make the dough cohesive enough to roll out and move to the pie plate.

Simply start with 3 cups of flour and 1 1/2 tsp salt. Start cutting in fat. When the fat is worked into the flour, and it resembles little pebbles, the flour to fat ratio is perfect. Sprinkle about 1/4 cup of ice water over the dough and fold in. You will have perfect crust every time, flaky and tender.

I made crust two nights ago for pasties. The guests at my home said that it was the flakiest pie crust ever. I didn't ice down anything, or chill the dough, or let it rest. I just did what I said above. The kitchen temperature was about 77'F.

Pie crust isn't as finicky as people think it is. Once you get the hang of it, it's really quite an easy thing to make.

One more thing, when cooking with family, it's a great tradition to put just a little flour on your partner's nose, and they do the same to you. It shows everyone else that the both of you are working on their behalf. And it's fun. And cooking has to be fun, and exciting. When the girls are home, it's tradition at our house.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:11 AM   #73
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Chief, you have the flour, salt and water measurements but not the fat...
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:29 AM   #74
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Chief, you have the flour, salt and water measurements but not the fat...
I don't measure the fat. I add a couple of tablespoons in (large blobs), and cut it into the flour. I then add more until I get that pea-gravel texture. If I recall, I believe I used up a 1 pound package of lard in one pie. But I'm not sure as it was a while ago. Just look for the pea-gravel texture and you can't go wrong. That way, if the flour has a little more air in it, or is compacted, you will still get the ratio right. Oh, and I've also accidently added too much fat. I then added another pinch of salt, and more flour, and cut it in to get the right texture in the dough. I just made pie crust cookies with the extra dough.

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Old 08-23-2012, 05:16 PM   #75
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I use the recipe on the box of Tenderflake lard. It says, in part, 5 1/2 cups all purpose flour or 6 cups of cake/pastry flour with 1 lb of lard for 3 double pie crusts.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:16 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I don't measure the fat. I add a couple of tablespoons in (large blobs), and cut it into the flour. I then add more until I get that pea-gravel texture. If I recall, I believe I used up a 1 pound package of lard in one pie. But I'm not sure as it was a while ago. Just look for the pea-gravel texture and you can't go wrong. That way, if the flour has a little more air in it, or is compacted, you will still get the ratio right. Oh, and I've also accidently added too much fat. I then added another pinch of salt, and more flour, and cut it in to get the right texture in the dough. I just made pie crust cookies with the extra dough.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Okay, close to a pound...gives me an idea of the minimum needed. Thanks!

Measurements...we don't need no stinkin' measurements!
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:08 PM   #77
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I use the recipe on the box of Tenderflake lard. It says, in part, 5 1/2 cups all purpose flour or 6 cups of cake/pastry flour with 1 lb of lard for 3 double pie crusts.
But TL, what if you only want once pie crust?

Chief Longwind's Tip of the Day #2
For those who are new to cooking, when making the perfect burger, and I'm talking a regular old ground beef burger, not the advanced burger with Gorgonzola, or chopped peppers, or with a lot of herbs and spices mixed in, the basic burger, take about 1/3 lb. of ground beef (I prefer ground chuck, 70/30 ratio, and form gently into a ball. Slowly work the ball into a flat disk about 1/4 inch thick. As you press the burger between your palms, press a little, then turn slightly, pressing the edge evenly with your thumb. Press a little more, again finishing by evening the edges with your thumb, turn and repeat until you have a smooth, round disk. Now, make the middle a little thinner than the outer edges as the meat will pull to the center as it cooks. This will give you a nice, even thickness that will cook evenly all the way through. Lightly salt one side and put that side into your preheated heavy frying pan. Fry over medium heat for about 3 minutes. Lightly salt the top an carefully flip the burger. Fry until the juices start to run on top of the beef patty. They should be clear. Remove to prepared buns, or to a plate. Serve immediately, as they will ooze out that good meat juice. If the buns have been lightly toasted, it will help keep them from getting soggy. Place your favorite toppings on top and serve with napkins. Your burgers will be very tender and juicy.

And for all of you burger experts out there, you already know how to add other ingredients, or not, to your burger. This was for making the basic burger in a frying pan. You can also cook this over charcoal or "gasp" gas flame.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-24-2012, 12:10 AM   #78
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Pie crust cookies. I have never heard them called that, but I am guessing that would be the leftover crust rolled out with cinnamon and sugar??? That is what we do with our leftovers here. I guess I never had a name for em. Now I do. Thanks.
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Old 08-24-2012, 01:07 AM   #79
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Pie crust cookies. I have never heard them called that, but I am guessing that would be the leftover crust rolled out with cinnamon and sugar??? That is what we do with our leftovers here. I guess I never had a name for em. Now I do. Thanks.
Yup, Pie Crust Cookies Another thing you can do with the left over pie crust, jelly roll a good fruit preserve into them. Bake and enjoy.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:35 AM   #80
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Someone here at DC mentioned that she does the same thing I do with leftover pie dough. We sprinkle sugar and maybe cinnamon; put them on a cookie sheet in the oven; and throw away burnt bits of pie dough when the pie is ready.
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