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Old 08-21-2012, 06:27 PM   #11
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Comforting food to me comes more as a memory of preparation and sound. We used to sit on my Grandparents back porch to string beans, shuck corn and peel apples. I watched them can all day and the sound of the pressure cooker whistling makes me feel like "home". Their canned tomato soup has been the best I have ever ate. I can't believe I will never have a jar of it again from their kitchen.
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Old 08-21-2012, 07:55 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlot
Comforting food to me comes more as a memory of preparation and sound. We used to sit on my Grandparents back porch to string beans, shuck corn and peel apples. I watched them can all day and the sound of the pressure cooker whistling makes me feel like "home". Their canned tomato soup has been the best I have ever ate. I can't believe I will never have a jar of it again from their kitchen.
I used to sit on the porch with Grandma (on her glider) and snap beans. Yesterday I sat on my deck (on my glider) and snapped beans. Great memories!
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:57 AM   #13
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Chopper & Merlot,

I wish to thank you both for your contributions and feedback.

I can empathize as I too, miss my Grandmother and Dad very much. Though Mom Eva is alive and in top shape for someone 95 1/2, she lives in Assisted Living.

Thanks again for the feedback,
Margaux.
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:36 AM   #14
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For a little while my dad was a survival instructor at Stead Air Force Base outside of Reno, Nevada. He was a Staff Sergeant with three daughters, so budget was the name of the game. I always remember Thursday night dinners. Daddy was "up in the mountains" from Saturday afternoon and got home Thursday afternoons and was ravenous. I don't know this from experience (I was at school) but Mom says she made him strip down in the garage and hosed down everything. Neither parent had much of a sweet tooth, but Mom would bake a cake or cupcakes because he was so darned hungry. Thursday happened to be Catechism classes after school, and I do remember that all of the religious Roman Catholic men would sit in the back of the base chapel for mass, and us kids would go wake our fathers up. Then, at our home it was always a beef bone New England Boiled Dinner because it stretched the budget and provided a lot of food. Mom gave up the ghost on meatless Fridays long before the church did because Daddy only ate meals at home on Thursday and Friday evening and she wanted to make hearty meals.

It really wasn't a long period of time, but I still fondly remember those Thursday meals.
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:40 AM   #15
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We always got to have a special request for our birthday dinners, and I always requested suki yaki. Mom always had "war bride" friends, women from Germany, France, and Japan, and the latter always did suki yaki and I loved it.
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:37 PM   #16
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For me there is not a shred of doubt....My Mom's chicken and dumplin's.
I can make 'em and they are good but they just don't taste as good as hers did.
My mom's chicken & dumplings were my family's favorite too. I remember helping make the dumplings all through my teen years & they came out right. Once I started making them on my own they never came close. She used flour, s&p, poultry seasoning, dried parsley & fat & broth skimmed from the pot the chicken was boiled in. She added butter to the pot if there wasn't much fat. We rolled & cut them into squares. They came out fluffy & slightly gray green from the parsley. We loved them. Mom stopped making them after we assigned chicken & dumplings as "punishment" for deserting the family & going with dad & friends to CanCun over Christmas one year.
I've taken over as the family's bear claw baker for Christmas breakfast. Every holiday also must have Waldorf Salad (wardrobe salad, as my dad says).
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:24 PM   #17
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I remember my mom's chicken and dumplings, too. Comfort food in our home as I was growing up. She made the puffy, biscuit style dumplings, it wasn't until way later that I heard of the thin strip style of dumplings.

Another comfort food at our table was my mother's pork chops and applesauce, and my dad's 'every-friday-Mexican-fiesta'. Great memories.
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:25 PM   #18
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Dad's Udon Noodle Soup...always the best.
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:30 PM   #19
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Hamburger soup. It's really simple but tastes so good. Oh, and slow cooker beef roasts. Those were a common Sunday dinner.
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Old 09-02-2012, 01:08 AM   #20
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When I was little, it was the best when the Garden Peas were filled out.

My brother and I learned to weed and take care of the garden from a very early age, so it was double cool when we were able to actually help produce food for the table. He and I would bring up a bucket full from the garden, along with whatever size small carrots and after we sat on the back porch podding the peas, Mom made Creamed peas and carrots for lunch. Dad always came in from the fields mid day. He always acted surprised, like It was his favorite thing. Served on mash potatoes or toast. Who knew my parents could be vegetarian. It was a treat to have a hot lunch in the summer. Usually it was sammies, baloney or salami on white wonder bread. and kool aid.

--
In college, my first experiences with cooking consisted of heating frozen pot pies or frozen pizza. I think the PP were 19 cents each or 10 for a dollar on sale. Ramen noodle packets and the blue box mac n' cheese apparently hadn't yet been invented, or discovered although Campbells soup surely was. Oh, and a room mate always had a connip-fit when someone "ruined" his Cast iron fry pan cooking eggs in it and either washed it or didn't wash it. I never understood the difference at the time. Eggs is eggs. Sheesh. And no one ever admitted they used the pan. Like no one admitted eating anyone's loaf bread or drinking their milk. Room-mates.

With my next set of room-mates, it was brown rice and veggies ( sliced carrots, onions and tamari sauce) 7 days/ week for a year and more. Cold rice with honey or tamari or cinammon for breakfast. It was good.
No one had any money. Yet we all made our way for the nightly trek to the all-night market for snacks and munchies

I still like brown rice, and tamari sauce. And scrubbed but not peeled baby carrots.
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