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Old 10-11-2007, 02:28 PM   #11
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I've noticed that the Mexican people tend to greet with a hug and kiss. Americans don't seem to do much of that.
The "take off your shoes" thing is a tradition in my house at least. I don't like to bring in extra germs and dirt from outside. We walk around in our socks or indoor slippers.
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:33 PM   #12
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GotGarlic, what do you mean? It doesn't matter what season it is, when you enter someone's house you take off your shoes and go around in your sock feet or in bare feet. Some folks bring indoor shoes to wear.
I mean, I grew up in Michigan, and if it's freezing cold outside, the floor inside is likely to be cold, too. I guess I would be carrying my slippers around all the time
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:36 PM   #13
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This is the kind of stuff I'm looking for! Thanks and keep 'em coming. I'm rather sheltered in that I've lived most of my lif in Ohio and VA. Spent some time in Indiana but only about 2-3 years when I was little. I do have itchy feet to go to other countries but the wallet is too thin to support my desire right now. I too didn't realize it is rude to keep your shoes on in Canada. Thanks again.
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:37 PM   #14
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Indian custom is also to not wear shoes in the house. Amongst Muslims we pray on the floor which is one reason we don't like outside stuff indoors.

Another custom which a lot of people are familiar with is eating with your fingers. Also we eat using right hand. That's the appropriate custom. No one uses two hands or left unless they are a kid or left handed.


Washing hands thoroughly before a meal is something we do and ofcourse after.

Another custom is related to respect of elders. It may be prevelant in other cultures as well but amongst Indians elders get the utmost respect. They are almost always catered to first and people will go out of their way to accomodate them (get them a chair, get them food etc.). They are also addressed with a lot of respect.

It was funny when I first came here it was a huge culture shock for me to see a much older gentelman addressed by his first name. Back home we would always add a more respectful title when addressing someone who was considered our elder.
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:38 PM   #15
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In the US the traditional color to wear when mourning someones death is Black. In some other countries (Korea for one I believe) white is what is worn for mourning.
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:46 PM   #16
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I am studying sign language to become an interpreter. As part of my language class we are also studying Deaf culture. As part of an assignment, we are to find 3 things about another culture that differ from American. Example given was how in Japan, boys and girls who are dating should not hold hands but in US it's okay. I'd like to hear from those of you have lived or are living elsewhere and have learned first hand the do's and don'ts of another culture what things you've noticed. It will be a great help for me and fun to discuss the differences between places. Thanks!
We have hosted exchange students from several European countries, and in Germany and Denmark, at least, people greet each other with a kiss on both cheeks.

In traditional Muslim societies, women often cover their hair with a headscarf; married women aren't permitted to go around outside the home without a male escort from their family (husband, father, brother); and in some areas, are not permitted to drive. Also, DH visited Morocco while in the Navy and was told that it's extremely rude to show the bottoms of your feet in public, akin to flipping the bird, and in Arab countries, you never eat food with your left hand - that hand is reserved for toilet duty.

When I was in Turkey, shopkeepers always brought apple tea to shoppers, even in the grocery store.

My dad was in China for two weeks on a business trip and observed that they don't use diapers on their toddlers - they wear split pants with their little butts hanging out. Not sure what the potty training procedure is.

HTH.
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Old 10-11-2007, 02:46 PM   #17
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"Is that all over Canada "

I think it varies from household to household. The other 2 in the house take them off, but I leave them on. Unless it's wintertime, I tell people to keep them on. (skanky socks, ya know??).

Where is it that it is acceptable, even preferable, to burp out loud after a meal? I'm sure I've heard that one. It shows the host you enjoyed the meal.
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Old 10-11-2007, 03:08 PM   #18
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It was funny when I first came here it was a huge culture shock for me to see a much older gentleman addressed by his first name. Back home we would always add a more respectful title when addressing someone who was considered our elder.
I grew up in the south and am back living here again. We always respected our elders as you mentioned, Yakuta. However, when it came to addressing someone older than we, we never used their "straight" first name. For example, if I wanted to speak to Mrs. Mary Jackson, I referred to her as "Miss" Mary. The "Miss" is always used whether the lady is married or single. Likewise, her husband, Russell, was addressed as "Mr." Russell.

And, like many things, what goes around, comes around. I'm now called "Miss" Katie by the younger set.
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Old 10-11-2007, 03:09 PM   #19
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Awesome thread, jabbur!
Loprraine, I believe in China and Japan, burping and in general, noisy eating is a compliment to the chef.
White is the color of mourning in Japan also, GB.
In France, Snoop Puss, the rule for tipping in a restaurant is the same as Spain apparently. Only the "small coins" that round up to the next Euro. I thought it had something to do with the hefty VAT tax if you are dining in. Folks think they've already been hit twice for the meal.
Dina, being from Texas too, I've noticed my Mexican friends hug and kiss all friends and family. My family is all from the south and we have always been big huggers. Pretty much, we hug anyone we've ever met before. When I lived in MA, people thought we were the strangest, hugginest folks ever. But we only kiss close family members.
Alix, I love the concept of not wearing outdoor shoes inside. It's why wall-to-wall carpeting gives me the creeps in America. My family takes off their shoes just inside the door but it's because we're really barefoot hillbillies at heart!
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Old 10-11-2007, 03:13 PM   #20
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I grew up in the south and am back living here again. We always respected our elders as you mentioned, Yakuta. However, when it came to addressing someone older than we, we never used their "straight" first name. For example, if I wanted to speak to Mrs. Mary Jackson, I referred to her as "Miss" Mary. The "Miss" is always used whether the lady is married or single. Likewise, her husband, Russell, was addressed as "Mr." Russell.

And, like many things, what goes around, comes around. I'm now called "Miss" Katie by the younger set.
We do this, too. My 5 year old calls all my friends Mr. or Miss and every adult he meets at the grocery store or in a restaurant or the lady who cuts his hair! And I always refer to anyone older than me as Ma'am or Sir as well. In the south, it's just good manners.
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