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Old 05-22-2014, 11:39 AM   #21
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Well, I found out today the reason for the pressure on the family to vacate the residents apartment.

I went down to sign my yearly renewal papers. It seems that HUD has changed the rules. It appears our families only have 14 days to vacate the apartment of our belongings now. Otherwise they will start at a prorated amount, start charging market price for the apartment after 14 days. It will come out of the deposit.
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Old 05-22-2014, 12:01 PM   #22
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Well, I found out today the reason for the pressure on the family to vacate the residents apartment.

I went down to sign my yearly renewal papers. It seems that HUD has changed the rules. It appears our families only have 14 days to vacate the apartment of our belongings now. Otherwise they will start at a prorated amount, start charging market price for the apartment after 14 days. It will come out of the deposit.
Well that just sucks!
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Old 05-22-2014, 08:52 PM   #23
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I would assume the rent on the apartment would still be paid during the cleaning out period. I don't think it would be fair for the landlord to be a free storage unit of the property of an estate. We continued to pay the utilities, taxes, alarm and insurance on my mother-in-law's house until it was empty.
That being said, I know my son could never clean this place out in 30 days. If he worked at it, maybe 30 weeks.
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Old 05-23-2014, 01:14 AM   #24
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Since my dearest friend lives in one of these government subsidized apartments, and the square footage is very small, I don't think it's unreasonable to have it vacated within two weeks. The waiting list is very long, and the need is great for those who need these places. I know my friend is thankful to have a decent place to live.
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Old 05-23-2014, 03:14 AM   #25
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Since my dearest friend lives in one of these government subsidized apartments, and the square footage is very small, I don't think it's unreasonable to have it vacated within two weeks. The waiting list is very long, and the need is great for those who need these places. I know my friend is thankful to have a decent place to live.
We have presently over 1,500 elderly apartments in my part of Boston alone. Fortunately, the powers that be saw the baby boomers ageing many years ago and realized the crisis it would create in the housing market. Any abandoned commercial building, school buildings, etc. have been rehabbed for elderly housing. And the building continues on. As I type there are three very large buildings on the waterfront being rehabbed for elderly housing. Next year they will be tearing down the Orient Heights projects that were built right after the war. There are still many elderly folks living there and they will have first pick of where they want to live. Each time they rehab one of these buildings, HUD is learning along with the company that manages these apartments. Such as the new units will have central heating but individual window AC appliances.

This is going on all over Boston. A lot of the WWII housing projects are being razed and the elderly have the option of staying in their part of Boston or moving to another section of the city into a new rehabbed building. Most opt to stay in their part of Boston that they grew up in and know best.

In Charlestown where the U.S.S. Constitution is moored is the old Navy Yard. When the last ship was repaired there, the city took it over from the Federal Govt. A couple of the buildings were designated as historical landmarks and can't be touched. But for the rest of the area the buildings were converted into very expensive condos, middle priced condos, some apartments for Section 8 folks, and a whole section for the elderly. There is a supermarket available along with some upscale restaurants. One building holds offices of businesses that often hire folks that live there. It also has a medical facility to attend to any emergencies and out patient services. Because Old Ironsides is berthed there, the police patrol the fenced in area around the clock. Not a bad place to live if you are on Section 8 or elderly. They have a very long waiting list. Charlestown residents have first choice. They too have a rather large housing project that is slated to be torn down.
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Old 05-23-2014, 07:45 AM   #26
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We often have our next resident sitting in the lobby waiting for their room to be vacated by someone discharging home. Rarely have an empty bed for long. I'm expecting 7 admits today, after the 7 discharges...and that's just my unit. Our other unit has 5 discharges and admits.
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Old 05-23-2014, 01:25 PM   #27
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We had one resident die while her niece was in the apartment with her taking care of her. Did the niece give her something to hurry her death? The police and coroner were called. All deaths are supposed to reported to the police unless it happens in a hospital or other medical facility. (We have crazy laws.)
Wow! My Dad died here in our home and no police even showed up. EMS declared him dead and we called the funeral home who picked up his body.
We were not asked any questions and I even told the EMS worker I purposely did not perform CPR.
EMS contacted the doctor by phone (Memorial Day 2007) after hours and that was it.

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I understand. The family should be allowed to grieve, and the departed person should be shown dignity. That manager needs a good kick in the backside, or a visit from those ghosts who visited Scrooge. If only such things were possible.
Was the departed's dignity disrespected because the apartment owners have a policy to make ready the premises for a new resident in the contract time?
I do assume a contract or lease agreement was in place?

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For the most part, coroners are sensitive. They don't allow any family member see what they do to the body in order to determine time of death. Anytime there is a death in the home, there will always be suspicion as to the cause.
Not always. And for sure, not always in my state.

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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Well, I found out today the reason for the pressure on the family to vacate the residents apartment.

I went down to sign my yearly renewal papers. It seems that HUD has changed the rules. It appears our families only have 14 days to vacate the apartment of our belongings now. Otherwise they will start at a prorated amount, start charging market price for the apartment after 14 days. It will come out of the deposit.
Seems very fair to me. Very fair now that I see the nature of the agreement.
Above I mentioned "lease agreement". It seems you have an agreement, but out of the scope of a regular/non-governmental rental agreement.

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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Since my dearest friend lives in one of these government subsidized apartments, and the square footage is very small, I don't think it's unreasonable to have it vacated within two weeks. The waiting list is very long, and the need is great for those who need these places. I know my friend is thankful to have a decent place to live.
Agree. And it would seem this agreement is a good idea for those who still live. The family and friends of the deceased.
Moving the items out and going through these items should help with the loss and grieving process. Maybe this time frame is actually a very good idea for all concerned?
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Old 05-23-2014, 01:59 PM   #28
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Agree. And it would seem this agreement is a good idea for those who still live. The family and friends of the deceased.
Moving the items out and going through these items should help with the loss and grieving process. Maybe this time frame is actually a very good idea for all concerned?
Although some families may gripe about having to do it within two weeks, they need to consider how others are in need of the housing. Addie expanded about the abundance of elderly housing in Boston but that's not the case in most of the country and certainly not here. These are not big places and unless the resident is a hoarder, there should be no problem with clearing it out in two weeks.
On a personal note, my husband of 42 years died in our large home of 35 years. I had to immediately place the home up for sale, and I'm here to tell you, grief can be a motivator for getting things done instead of wallowing in self pity.
My signature seems particularly relevant here.
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Old 05-23-2014, 03:30 PM   #29
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And it is for those very reasons Kayelle, that little by little I have been giving various items to the kids that I know they want. Like The Pirate wants my potato ricer and large green Depression glass bowl. Spike so far has the electric knife sharpener, meat slicer, and a few other items. I also got rid of all the dust collectors.

The odd thing is that I have some belongings that were my mother's. Those are what the kids fight over. When you clean out a house or apartment, you really need a family member that has a truck. We have two trucks in the family. We have a hoarder here. When HUD came through for their yearly inspection, they could barely get into the door. The hammer came down. Management was told to contact the family and give them five days to clean out the apartment. Or evict the tenant. The family did clean out the place and placed the resident in a nursing home.

The main things my kids will have to deal with is the furniture. The bed will go out by the dumpster and the scooter goes to Winthrop. There are ten other pieces that they will have to make a decision about. I assume it will all go to Goodwill or the Salvation Army. Which is fine with me. When my youngest daughter died, my oldest daughter went with me to clean out her place. I collapsed and the job was left for her to do. I have never asked her about it. Still can't.
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Old 05-23-2014, 03:36 PM   #30
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We often have our next resident sitting in the lobby waiting for their room to be vacated by someone discharging home. Rarely have an empty bed for long. I'm expecting 7 admits today, after the 7 discharges...and that's just my unit. Our other unit has 5 discharges and admits.
You is a busy kid. Nothing like paperwork to keep you going.
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