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Old 10-29-2013, 09:42 PM   #1
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Halloween for people who didn't grow up with it

My Honey is Australian, and didn't grow up with it. He is a highly regarded professional, and usually level and logically headed -- until it comes to Halloween and then he is Batspit! Since he didn't grow up with it, he turns into a 12 year old at this time of year. Seriously, spiders, skulls, witches; I never ever thought I would turn to him and say, "Do you want to put up this devil bat?"

I noticed that a lot of Brits and Canadians have embraced it, but....why? For the costumes, the panhandling for candy, the general silliness of it?

My gay friends say it is the High Holy days for gay culture, but other than that, I don't get it. It was a dress up/beg candy from stangers night when I was a kid.

What's going on?

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Old 10-29-2013, 09:52 PM   #2
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I never got into it. Never cared for it. Never did anything for it. And definitely not about to start now.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:57 PM   #3
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:02 PM   #4
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Halloween isn't American, I think its North American. So we Canadians have done it about as long as you Americans have. I'm not a big fan of the gore and stupidity, but I like seeing the little kids in their costumes.

Brits tend to do Guy Fawkes stuff on the 5th I think.
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:04 PM   #5
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I'm the first born Canadian in my family and didn't get introduced to Halloween until I started school. We lived in a European neighborhood of mostly German, Hungarian and Polish immigrants so it wasn't celebrated. Mrs D doesn't understand it either, but she used to love Fasching every year when we lived in Germany. Kind of a mix of Mardi Gras and Halloween celebrated for the week starting on the Thursday before Ash Wednesday.
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:14 PM   #6
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Nothing but the facts...

Halloween - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Old 10-29-2013, 11:28 PM   #7
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It's definitely a kid's holiday, although there are many adults who seem to enjoy it, too. My work has a big Halloween office party, complete with potluck lunch and best costume awards.

Fortunately it isn't mandatory, because I don't get it, either. I haven't really been into Halloween since I was... I dunno... 12 or 13. But then again, I work with a bunch of 30 and 40-somethings who still play video games and read comic books.
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:59 PM   #8
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I will be in costume on Thursday...haven't quite decided what yet. It's fantasy, make-believe and a blast of fun! I give out candy all year, for the joy of giving and seeing people happy to receive. Halloween is just another day, but with COSTUMES!!!
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:47 AM   #9
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Interesting to look at the original meaning and the history going back centuries in the UK , as it was All Hallows' Eve celebrating the souls of the dead .

Now ,it's an excuse to dress up , have a bit of fun, get sweets for free, can't see much wrong with that . It's mainly younger children here and I have a delightful gaggle of little witches and skeletons on my doorstep each year, all accompanied by adults , and I have bowls of sweets ready for them .

It has gone bigger no doubt with the dressing up .
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Old 10-30-2013, 06:33 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SherryDAmore View Post
My Honey is Australian, and didn't grow up with it. He is a highly regarded professional, and usually level and logically headed -- until it comes to Halloween and then he is Batspit! Since he didn't grow up with it, he turns into a 12 year old at this time of year. Seriously, spiders, skulls, witches; I never ever thought I would turn to him and say, "Do you want to put up this devil bat?"

I noticed that a lot of Brits and Canadians have embraced it, but....why? For the costumes, the panhandling for candy, the general silliness of it?

My gay friends say it is the High Holy days for gay culture, but other than that, I don't get it. It was a dress up/beg candy from stangers night when I was a kid.

What's going on?
Whilst Hallowe'en has been a tradition for centuries in the UK, trick or treating has really only taken hold in the UK over the last 20 years or so. It has featured in so many movies from "Meet Me In St Louis" to Charlie Brown via a whole clutch of horror films so I suppose it isn't surprising that American culture has been embraced over here. There are two aspects of it that concern me - one being the trick part which can be quite vicious and an excuse for varying degrees of vandalism -some very serious (a car set on fire, would you believe?) and the other being child safety issues.

When I lived in Hyde we used to get a lot of children at the door. Some were with parents who stood at the gate and kept an eye on proceedings but a large number were toddlers accompanied by older children often no older than 9 or 10 with no apparent adult supervision and who were strangers to the immediate area. (I lived in a row of Victorian terraced houses with just a very small patch of a "garden" in front so you could see up and down the street and everyone knew everyone else.) The object of the game was not sweets/candies. What they wanted was money!

Because I was an old grouch and worried about encouraging unaccompanied children to knock on strangers' doors, I didn't play the game and when the same child had knocked on my door 6 times over 2 nights one year I decided to fight back. I informed him that if he came again I would turn him into a frog. He never came back - and I never had a trick or treat-er or "Penny for the Guy" child at the door again! The word must have got round that I was an old witch!

It will be interesting to see if any T-or-T-ers call tomorrow at the new house. It's Thursday and I usually have the horse fairies looking after Horse so I'll be in. I shall have to get my witch costume out of storage.
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