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Old 09-08-2006, 07:54 PM   #11
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Glad to hear things worked out ok. If that were me or my spouse, I would have gone to the ER right away, but calling poison control was a good idea by GB!
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Old 09-08-2006, 08:31 PM   #12
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Gasoline is a skin irratant but not a major one. I have been splashed with gasoline on many parts of my body over the years (that's what happens when you start playing with motorcycles and such at 12 years old). In sensitive areas, it feels like it's burning the skin. But it really isn't causing much damage. There are carcinogens in many solvents, and gasoline is a solvent, as well as a fuel. So it's wise from that standpoint as well, to keep gas off of your skin.

The main danger from gasoline is that it is highly flamable. I know this from personal experience and have the scars on my right shin to prove it. So any time gas is splashed onto your clothing or skin, wash it immediately with fresh and soapy water. Soap is an imulsifier that will help remove the gasoline. Washing with freshwater, baking soda, and salt will help remove the odor, but not completely.

I cannot stress how dangerous it is to have gasoline on the skin or on clothing. It ignites very easily and takes literally seconds to create deep 2nd-degree, or even 3rd degree burns. And I can tell you that I would compare severe burn pain with labor for intensity. And it hurts for much longer that does a bad sprain, or labor. It easily took 8 months for the pain to diminish. And that skin, 24 years later, if I but bump that shin against something, it will break and I have a sore that has to heal.

Be extrememly carefull with flamable liquids. And dispite what is taught us to put out a fire (stop-drop-&-roll), a flamable liquid fire must be completely smothered and removed from all ignition sources to be extinguished. I put my burning pants out after the stop-drop-& roll did nothing, by removing the blue jeans, turning them inside-out as I did so. That put out the fire. Oh, and I had to get about twenty yards further away from the bon-fire that had caused the gas to flash in the first place. As I was running to put distance between me and the fire, my wife was screaming that I was doing the wrong thing. But the gas was just re-flashing as fast as I had been puting it out until I got away from the bon-fire. I was about 30 feet from that fire when my pants initially burst into flame.

If there's gas on you, get it off! Even if in a public place (thankfully, I was out in the boonies) get that clothing off as soon as possible. Don't go through the months of agony that I went through.

And ladies, if you want an education, take a small sheet of metal (like a cookie sheet) and place onto a fire-safe area. Hang a nylon stocking above it and light the stocking with a long butane lighter. Do not let any part of your body get close to the burning nylon! Watch as the nylon melts and drips onto the metal. Nylon, rayon, and other clothing materials made from similar plastics burn easily. And when they do, they melt and stick to your skin, causing severe burns. I have a scar on one of my fingers from a piece of burning nylon rope that dripped onto it. I was fusing the end of a rope with flame, to keep it from unraveling. It's a great way to insure that the rope remains useful. But if you get just a bit careless, you pay a painful price.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-08-2006, 08:34 PM   #13
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What great advice Goodweed...and sorry you can tell us through your own experiences!!!
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Old 09-09-2006, 03:20 AM   #14
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Sorry you had this mishap..

next time 911!!!!
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Old 09-09-2006, 03:50 AM   #15
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gasoline/petrol is actualy a mixture of Several different hydrocarbons, despite apearances it`s not made of just one substance, the problem occurs with the short chain hydrocarbons, the solvent action is so good that it will strip the skin of it`s natuaral oils in no time.
that can lead to cracking and roughness, contact dermititis and indeed pain with more sensitive areas, it would be a good idea to apply a moisturiser to the affected areas when cleaned, after sun lotion is good, olive oil, glycerine etc... will help now :)
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Old 09-09-2006, 03:51 AM   #16
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sorry double post.
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Old 09-09-2006, 06:02 AM   #17
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Thank you all for your good wishes and concern.

Goodweed, oh my! What a horrible experience. I am so very sorry you had to go through that. Bless your heart! Now, I realize that we were doubly blessed! He is ok now, a little tender, but not even red AND he didn’t catch on fire! When hubby was splashed, it also splashed onto his shirt a little. I tried to get him to change, but only because I was thinking that it would irritate his skin – which somehow it didn’t.- but he was being a little stubborn and wouldn’t change. Now, I’m thinking how stupid we were not to even think of it being flammable!! If I’m ever around someone who gets splashed with gasoline, I will INSIST that they get out of those clothes immediately. GW, thank you for sharing your hard-earned knowledge!

I visit D.C. quite often, but rarely ever post. But that doesn’t seem to matter to any of you – yall are always there when I need you and are still continuing to voice your concern. I love this place! D.C. is wonderful!! And what makes it so wonderful?? All of you wonderful people, of course! (sappy enough? )
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Old 09-09-2006, 10:17 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by ps8
Thank you all for your good wishes and concern.

Goodweed, oh my! What a horrible experience. I am so very sorry you had to go through that. Bless your heart! ...
I'ts ok. I handled the pain and lived to tell about it. It hasn't hurt for many years, except when I bump the shin. You learn to incorporate precautions as you go through life and avoid bumped shins.

In any case, because I went through it, I was able to teach my children from my mistakes, and share the experience with all of you. So If what I type helps others to avoid what happened to me, then it was worth it.

Besides, think of all of the women who choose to edure the discomfort and ultimate pain of pregnancy. They go in knowiing full well that "This is gonna hurt, a lot!" And often, they do it multiple times. That's a heroic thing.

I have to admit, it was the most painful experience in my life. And as soon as I get any flamable siquid on any clothing now, it's removed ASAP. My pain wasn't by choice, though I didn't let it slow me down. But it wasn't heroic, just something I had to deal with. I was out in the woods after two days, with a plastic bread bag tapped around the burned and badaged area, cutting trees, and bucking, then splitting the wood to sell. I couldn't stay still. I tried, but it didn't work for me.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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