"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-13-2012, 08:30 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
This was my most recent plumbing project. I decided to remodel the porcelain receptacle. However, my expertise ended at the point where this picture was taken and I called a plumber to do the rest.
Where's the KA mixer ? One of the first DYI projects I undertook by myself was to reset the toilet. It was leaking, so I had to remove it and put in a new gasket. That is probably one of the easier projects I've done, in hindsight.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 08:59 PM   #22
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
With plumbing projects, repairs, re-piping, or whatever, I always buy way more pipes, connectors, adapters....whatever needed, more than what the job calls for, just so that I don't have to go running back to Home Depot multiple times. After the job is complete I return all unused items for a refund on my next trip there.
I always buy extra too. I keep the extras as a way to build up an inventory of common items I would use again. Bigger ticket items get returned.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 09:04 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Me too on the toilet fun. It's a yucky job when you think about it but just wear gloves and open the window and get a fan going.

While doing the work just focus your mind on the concept that a plumber would charge more than your doctor's hourly rate to do the job, yet it's a job that even somebody without a high school education could do if they are able to read the directions. Reading skill may be required.

Along the way you'll learn interesting things about wax donuts.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 10:10 AM   #24
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Oh, Andy! What did you drop? The tank lid?
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 10:11 AM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,303
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
Oh, Andy! What did you drop? The tank lid?
It was his KA mixer! All the more reason not to store the KA mixer in a room where there is a toilet!
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 12:28 PM   #26
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
It depends on what the project is.

I've put up drywall, cabinets, and installed wood and tile flooring. I've also done electrical and minor plumbing. My rule of thumb regarding where to draw the line between DIY and calling an expert is this: if the project involves one single large, expensive piece of material that can be somehow screwed up, I'll leave it to an expert. For example, I had no problem doing a floor tiling project because if I messed up or broke a few tiles, I could simply throw them away and move on.

We also put in carpeting at the same time. Since a single huge roll of carpet costs a lot of money, I didn't want to chance messing it up, so I called a carpet layer to do the work.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 01:32 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 9,632
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post

My rule of thumb regarding where to draw the line between DIY and calling an expert is this: if the project involves one single large, expensive piece of material that can be somehow screwed up, I'll leave it to an expert.
I agree, like granite countertops, for instance. .....and carpeting too, as you mentioned....leave them for the pros. Hardwood flooring, on the other hand, I can do myself.
__________________
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 01:36 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
It depends on what the project is.

I've put up drywall, cabinets, and installed wood and tile flooring. I've also done electrical and minor plumbing. My rule of thumb regarding where to draw the line between DIY and calling an expert is this: if the project involves one single large, expensive piece of material that can be somehow screwed up, I'll leave it to an expert. For example, I had no problem doing a floor tiling project because if I messed up or broke a few tiles, I could simply throw them away and move on.

We also put in carpeting at the same time. Since a single huge roll of carpet costs a lot of money, I didn't want to chance messing it up, so I called a carpet layer to do the work.
I agree, to a point Steve. It also depends on the person's aptitude. The DH has profound aptitude when it comes to doing stuff--but then, he also has a Ph.D. in mech. eng., and several undergaduate degrees. He designs stuff for companies looking for prototypes and tests stuff. He also has all the tools one needs to do stuff. You want a concrete vanity, he can make one for you. You want a sawmill, he can make one. You want a hardwood floor, he can prep the wood for you. You want hardware for cabinets cast in metal, he can do that. You want something turned in wood, he can do that. Most folks probably go to a store and buy what is needed (which we do re: plumbing stuff and fixtures, etc.), but not cabinets, flooring, counter tops, lumber (make that), etc. Our DYI is probably more along the lines of how people did things 100 years ago. The materials are a lot cheaper than if you figure the time to make the stuff, finish it, or install it. The cost for the hardwood floor in the bedroom--more than most people would want to spend for a room that size. But, the real cost, minus the labor, was under $300. To me, the floor is priceless. If I were to put the house on the market, the floor would probably be considered something a person would want to strip and stain and then finish to make it look like engineered hardware so it would look like a floor one would get in a cookie-cutter house. I don't plan on putting the house on the market, and I like the floor.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	floor 010.jpg
Views:	53
Size:	23.9 KB
ID:	13912  
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 02:10 PM   #29
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,303
When I go back to the house in the City, I'll take some pics of some of the things we've done. For example, I hate hollow-core doors, so we made doors out of basewood. There are still two more doors to do before all the interior doors are replaced. I also hate prefab cabinets--so we made white oak cabinets for the bathroom. (First you have to get the logs, then you have to make the lumber, dry it, etc.) I also hate NA closets. So, besides the closet in the master bedroom, we made a built-in cupboard for the "could be guest room" and one to be the linen closet. The concrete vanity is obviously in the bathroom. The ash butcher block counter top in the kitchen. The house is a work in progress, slow but sure. I also hate fancy molding (hate cleaning--I have OCD when it comes to cleaning baseboards--I would use a toothbrush to get all the grim/dust out of the curls), so we used plain pine boards as molding along the floor--easier to clean and they work for me. And, I have lived in this house with as many as 7 Saint Bernards and Newfoundlands, so easy cleaning has been the driving force when replacing stuff. The bathroom vanity is off the floor high enough so that one can mop the floor underneath.

An easy DYI project to refresh the hardware on the kitchen cabinets, was to pick up some metallic paint (I got brushed nickel). I removed, sanded, and cleaned with rubbing alcohol all the hardware. Spray painted the hardware, and then coated them with a water-based finish. Total cost was about $20. To replace all the hardware with a similar type would have been around $200. Someday, maybe, but for now, I have an updated look re: the hardware on the cabinets in the kitchen.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 05:53 PM   #30
Master Chef
 
DaveSoMD's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,038
Hmmmmmm pretty much anything DIY: carpentry, construction, painting, roofing, basic electric like replacing sockets, basic plumbing. This the shed that we designed and I built a few years ago in our backyard.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P9211998.jpg
Views:	51
Size:	103.9 KB
ID:	13913   Click image for larger version

Name:	P9181966.jpg
Views:	56
Size:	110.9 KB
ID:	13914  

Click image for larger version

Name:	P9222010.jpg
Views:	56
Size:	108.2 KB
ID:	13915  
__________________

__________________
Quoth the chicken, "Fry some more."
AB - Good Eats: Fry Hard II
DaveSoMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.