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Old 05-22-2013, 11:21 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I find this thread judgmental and political. And outdated and silly.

It's full of disturbing stereotypes and outdated thinking.

What's wrong with a woman without a husband having a baby?
Nothing today Jenny. But as a teenager in the 50's if a girl got pregnant she was wisked off to an imaginary aunt out in Illinois and when the baby was born, it was put up for adoption. Thank God those days are no more. No mother should be forced to lose her child. No matter her age.

Today a lot of women are choosing motherhood without the benefit of a husband. But a lot of these fathers contribute time and money to the child and are a part of its life. The child grows up knowing it is love that brought it into this world. It has two parents.

If you had asked that question in the late 50's, I would have been horrified at the thought of a single mother. Today, I am all for it. I see so many children of single mothers. They are well taken care of and receive love 24/7. They are truly wanted children.
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Old 05-22-2013, 11:53 PM   #22
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no need for censorship, imo.

there's something to be learned from a regional and/or personal opinion.

i agree whole heartedly with gg, but that's mostly because of my experience living in nyc, a vanguard of many things.

it's nice to see historical opinions so they are seen later in perspective. contrary or in agreement the lot. no one is wrong, just themselves at this time. that changes less than every sevond. or better said, temporally.
, just my opinion.
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Old 05-23-2013, 06:50 AM   #23
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How old is Grandma?
(Read this to the end-- quite an eye opener.)


You could buy a new Ford Coupe for $600, but who could Afford one? Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon.

We volunteered to protect our precious country. No wonder people call us "old and confused" and say there is a generation gap.

How old do you think I am?


Are you ready?????

This woman would be only 62 years old.
She would have been born in 1951.

GIVES YOU SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT.
Sounds like she was born prior to WW2. I do not believe there were any new cars for $600 nor 11 cent a gallon gasoline after WW2. If there were so many volunteers, there would have been no need for conscription (AKA, the draft).
Use of penicillin was not uncommon in the late 1940's.
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Old 05-23-2013, 09:55 AM   #24
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Sounds like she was born prior to WW2. I do not believe there were any new cars for $600 nor 11 cent a gallon gasoline after WW2. If there were so many volunteers, there would have been no need for conscription (AKA, the draft).
Use of penicillin was not uncommon in the late 1940's.
My jury's still out on the gas...and the car.

My physician father bought our first car in 1954. He had just graduated from med school, so he probably wasn't "flush."

As for the gas, I recall that when I was in high school in the early '60s and my friends and I wanted to borrow the family car to "cruise" on the weekend nights, we searched the sofa cushions and the floorboards of the car for loose change. We usually found enough to keep us happy.

Also, I had my first child in 1970 and, in Washington, DC, gasoline at that time was about 25 cents per gallon so, perhaps, 20 years earlier it could've been 11 cents.

Just my observations and experience.
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:04 AM   #25
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My jury's still out on the gas...and the car.

My physician father bought our first car in 1954. He had just graduated from med school, so he probably wasn't "flush."

As for the gas, I recall that when I was in high school in the early '60s and my friends and I wanted to borrow the family car to "cruise" on the weekend nights, we searched the sofa cushions and the floorboards of the car for loose change. We usually found enough to keep us happy.

Also, I had my first child in 1970 and, in Washington, DC, gasoline at that time was about 25 cents per gallon so, perhaps, 20 years earlier it could've been 11 cents.

Just my observations and experience.
My father was in the automobile business and grandfather had a gasoline station. In 1949 a cherry 1948 Chevy was going for about $1,800 and regular gas over 20 cents per gallon in the NYC area. Sear's motor oil was about 30 cents per quart.
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Old 05-23-2013, 12:12 PM   #26
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My father was in the automobile business and grandfather had a gasoline station. In 1949 a cherry 1948 Chevy was going for about $1,800 and regular gas over 20 cents per gallon in the NYC area. Sear's motor oil was about 30 cents per quart.
Some of the things mentioned in that article could be regional. I am a west coast girl and the prices you mention for the east coast are quite high. When I was 18 we still weren't paying 20 cents a gallon - it was more like 18 cents and we could find gas for around 15 cents if we searched.

The chatter on this article has been interesting. Interesting in how some people take offense to something that happened so many years ago as though it's happening today. The comments about it being judgemental, political, wrong and everything else.

Some people had fond memories come back to them by reading the article.

Take it at face value. Remove your own prejudices, pre-conceived notions, beliefs and open your mind to what is in front of you ... someone's personal perspective on history - not yours .. someone else's.

We all have memories, ideas, ideals etc and you better know that they will not jive with everyone else's .. but that does not make them wrong.

Look at a recipe .. decide if it's right for you but don't crucify the writer .. simply read it and choose to use it or walk away.
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Old 05-23-2013, 12:42 PM   #27
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I agree MrsLMB. I read it and enjoyed it, understanding that, perhaps, it wasn't completely factual. Still, it gives us a peek back to different times.

Glenn and I were talking a few days ago about the concept of sending our children to their room as punishment. When our children were small, mine are now in their 40s, it was a different ballgame. Being sent to their room meant they ran the risk of being bored out of their gourds.

Today's room "time-outs" are quite different. Not much punishment when a youngster can sit with a handheld game, etc. and do their time.

Prior to my children, my grandmother used to make us stand with our nose in a pencil-drawn circle on a door facing. And...the circle was just high enough that we had to stand slightly on our toes.

Time marches on and things change. Good or bad. That's not the issue. Just that they change.
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Old 05-23-2013, 02:26 PM   #28
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Definitely no need for censorship but everyone is entitled to their opinions on this piece, whatever they may be . The "good old days" were not necessarily good for everyone, people went through unimaginable suffering in so many ways , so you can't just generalise . It's just nostalgia through rosť tinted glasses .
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Old 05-23-2013, 03:24 PM   #29
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...Glenn and I were talking a few days ago about the concept of sending our children to their room as punishment...Today's room "time-outs" are quite different. Not much punishment when a youngster can sit with a handheld game, etc. and do their time....
Jay Leno had joked about this a couple years ago. Went something like "they have a TV, computer and phone in their rooms - why would you send them there? Send them to your room...there ain't nothin' happenin' there!"
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Old 05-23-2013, 03:27 PM   #30
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...The "good old days" were not necessarily good for everyone, people went through unimaginable suffering in so many ways , so you can't just generalise . It's just nostalgia through rosť tinted glasses .
But that's got a lot to do with the human spirit. We tend to remember the happier events and try to not dwell on the tragic. Boston just experienced a terrible tragedy with the Marathon bombings. Local news has, of course, been keeping up with the details of the case. Even more than that, the stories are about the resilience of the people affected, how strong they are and how generous everyone in Boston - no, across the nation and beyond - is with time or financial support. The news is dwelling on the good in spite of the evil that occurred. It's this quality of the human spirit that makes us all push through.
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